nobel prize winner's

7

built five hundred feet into the permafrost of a norwegian island located some six hundred miles from the north pole (and twice that from oslo), the svalbard global seed vault is the world’s largest and most secure seed bank. 

safe from earthquake and flooding, and designed to last a thousand years, its mission is to serve as a backup for planet’s agriculture in the event of a catastrophe, be it from drought, floods, disease, war (see: syria) and/or the slow moving disaster of climate change.

known as the doomsday vault, it has amassed over 840,000 seed samples since the first deposit, that of rice seeds, was made in 2008 by the late kenyan environmental activist and nobel peace prize winner, wangari maathai. 

since then, all countries, save japan and china (the later of which is believed to have already lost 90 percent of its rice varieties) have entrusted the site with their agricultural heritage, and the collection, as of now, covers about half of the world’s known crop diversity. 

CNN commentator shuts down analyst who compares “vagina-grabbing” Trump to MLK

  • Jeffrey Lord, a former Reagan White House staff member hired by CNN in 2015 for the sole purpose of defending President Donald Trump, called Trump “the Martin Luther King of health care” on Thursday morning. 
  • Lord compared Trump’s push on an unpopular health care bill to King’s leadership during the Civil Rights Act.Symone Sanders, a former staffer on Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign, who sat opposite Lord and who is black, did not agree with that characterization.
  • “Jeffrey, you do understand… you do understand that Dr. King was marching for civil rights because people that look like me were being beaten, dogs were being sicced on them, basic human rights were being withheld from them merely because of the color of their skin?” Sanders asked. 

  • “So let’s not equate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., a humanitarian, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, to the vagina-grabbing President Donald Trump.” Read more. (4/13/2017 12:31 PM)

“i’m gonna marry you.”

it’s not the first time kara’s said it, but lena feels her cheeks flush anyways. she focuses on the road in front of her, the feel of the steering wheel underneath suddenly sweaty palms. 

“alright, dear.” lena takes a chance side-glance at her girlfriend and finds kara all soft smiles, something secret and intimate brewing between the two of them. 

“alright,” kara repeats. she turns, palm under her head and elbow on the door as the open breeze whips her golden curls around. the moment feels new, feels real. lena turns up the radio and smiles, wishes for time to come to a standstill. 

.

“i’m gonna marry you.”

kara’s breath is hot against her ear and lena can feel their heartbeats syncing as one. she breathes deep through her nose, runs her fingers through damp hair. kara lounges on her chest and seems content to just lie there forever - and lena doesn’t really mind. kara is made from the stars and lena holds the universe on her chest. 

“and i’m gonna marry you.” lena whispers this into the night air, the room still sticky with heat. there’s a hitch in kara’s breath, slight, subtle, but a hitch nonetheless. 

“i look forward to it.” a wet kiss is placed below lena’s jaw then, followed by a trail of more hungry ones, and lena holds onto broad shoulders, wonders what salt tastes like on a hungry tongue. 

.

“i’m gonna marry you.” kara says it like she’s going to make a stop at the grocery and is asking lena what kind of milk she wants. 

this time, there’s no surprise, only the warmth of familiarity that seeps through lena’s veins at those words of endearment. 

“i know,” lena jokes. she doesn’t look up from the email that she’s typing up. “tmz is doing a countdown for the big proposal.”

across the living room, kara sticks her tongue out at her and rolls her eyes. lena continues to type and for a while, the only sounds of the apartment are the click clack of a keyboard and the shuffling of kara’s papers. 

“you’d still say yes, right?” 

lena looks up momentarily. “what?” she asks. 

there’s a hesitancy to the slope of kara’s shoulders. “you would still say yes, right? if i asked to marry you?”

lena lets out a soft laugh - nothing intimidating or loud, just soft - and sits back in her chair, catches her girlfriend’s honest gaze with her own, “my dear, i’d follow you to the ends of the universe and back, you know that.”

this seems to soothe kara, who returns back to her books at hand. “alright,” she says as she pushes up her glasses. “just checking.”

.

“i’m gonna marry you.” 

kara is crying, big, uncontrollable silent sobs down her cheeks. lena feels her own eyes well up in return; seeing kara in all her sadness never made for a dry eye between the both of them. 

kara lies on the deo bed under sunlamps. and lena luthor is a child prodigy, a genius billionaire, a nobel peace prize winner and a forbes 30 under 30, but she will never understand the deepness of kara’s sorrow, the cuts and the space that kara’s mind occupies where no sunlight can reach. she tries. lena tries hard, and it’s times like these where she can only do so much but hold kara’s hand a pray for the sunrise to come quick. 

lena’s mouth is dry when she speaks. “you’re gonna marry me,” she whispers, urges, promises, “you’re gonna marry me, and i’m gonna marry you, and you’re gonna have something steady to call your own.”

kara cries harder at this, tears streaming and silent heaves, but it’s enough. it’s enough for now, and it’s a promise of forever. 

.

“i’m gonna marry you.”

and kara does. kara and lena exchange vows under a setting sun with matching bracelets on their arms and a song in their hearts and kara and lena marry each other when the world is turning into a new day and their beginning is just reaching the first page. lena marries kara and they sit on a rooftop at the end of the night, look into the constellations of stars and eons and legends and they find a home among the infinite, a peace among the unknown. 

.

Things Said/Heard at Rocky Horror Rehearsal

Note: due to the nature of RHPS, a lot of these are somewhat risque, albeit in a sorta cracky way. Nothing here has to lead to direct NSFW, but doing so would be pretty easy. (So’s Janet!)

  • “It’s okay. My lungs are still in my body. I’m good.”
  • “I have plans for your fake dick.”
  • “It doesn’t matter! Nothing matters! Just form a kickline!”
  • “Please yourselves. Not literally. At least, not on stage.”
  • “This is why we keep the feather boas in quarantine.”
  • “You- you’re a lot. I like you.”
  • “This is when you start to get groovy.”
  • “I could kiss you. I could marry you. I could buy you ice cream.”
  • “IT’S WEDNESDAY NIGHT. WHO’S READY TO GET SLUTTY?”
  • “Shit, I thought this was water polo practice.”
  • “Biochemical research gets me so hot.
  • “This is the weirdest aerobics session I’ve ever seen.”
  • “I claim my prize.”
  • “I haven’t been this aroused since Nixon was president.”
  • “Where are the horses? I thought there would be horses.”
  • “I need you to channel your inner vodka aunt. I need you to channel your inner 10,000 vodka aunts.”
  • “Make it weirder. I know it’s weird. But make it weirder.”
  • “You’re, like, a sex god. You’re like a Nobel Prize winner sex god.”
  • “I like to approach all my problems crotch-first.”
  • “Okay, who here knows the Funky Chicken?”
  • “I’m so proud of you. You’re going to make me cry.”
  • “Anyone have a tampon?”
  • “Anyone have a hair band?”
  • “Anyone have any idea what’s going on?”
  • “There will be no actual nudity and no actual murder-cannibalism- at least, if everything goes according to plan.”
  • “Where’s the glitter and why is everyone sober?”
  • “Don’t worry about me. I’m having a good time.”
  • “You fuck with my boas, I will fuck with you.”
  • “It’s all cool. Nothing is on fire. Yet.”
  • “We’re allowed to step on you if you’re in the way.”
  • “OH SHIT MY TITS ARE OUT”
  • “I’m glad that we dream about each other in the worst possible ways.”
  • “It’s awful. I love it.”
  • “You. Me. Selfie. Now.”
  • “Feel this fabric. Now imagine it rubbing against your nipples. Frantically.”
  • “We are not responsible for any weird boners you may get this evening.”
  • “You guys, I just- I just love you so much. I’m so happy. You guys.”
A Dozen Women Scientists You’ve Never Heard Of

Dr. Alice Hamilton: pioneer in industrial medicine in the U.S
Dr. Florence Rena Sabin: pioneer in the movement to change the aim of medical study from the cure to the prevention of disease.
Dr. Lise Meitner: Pioneer in nuclear physics. First scientist to recognize that the atom could be split to release tremendous amounts of energy.
Dr. Leta S. Holilngworth: Pioneer in the science of clinical psychology. An early fighter for women’s rights.
Dr. Rachel Fuller Brown: Chemist. Co-discoverer of the antibiotic nystatin, the first antibiotic effective against fungus diseases.
Dr. Gladys Anderson Emerson: The first to isolate vitamin E from wheat germ oil and study its functions. Studied the possible relationship of nutrition to cancer and arteriosclerosis.
Dr. Maria Goeppert Mayer: Nobel Prize winner in physics fro her shell theory of the nucleus of the atom.
Dr. Myra Adele Logan: Pioneer in medicine. First woman surgeon to operate on the heart. First black woman to be elected a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons
Dr. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin: Nobel Prize winner in chemistry in 1964. Determined the structure of important chemical compounds of the body by cyrstallography.
Dr. Jane C. Wright: Pioneer of chemotherapy. First black woman to be appointed to a high post in medical administration.
Dr. Rosalyn S. Yalow: Nobel Prize winner in medicine, 1977, for her discovery of radioimmunoassay
Dr. Sylvia Earle Mead: Marine biologist who led the first US team of female aquanauts in the Tektite Underwater Research Project 

10

TSOCG presents day two of Black History Month 2014: “The Divine Nine”

These are the nine historically Black Greek Letter Organizations (BGLOs) that together comprise the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC). The NPHC was created in an era when racial segregation and disenfranchisement plagued African Americans. The establishment of each of these organizations bore witness to the fact that despite hardships African Americans refused to accept a status of inferiority.

The organization’s stated purpose and mission in 1930:

“Unanimity of thought and action as far as possible in the conduct of Greek letter collegiate fraternities and sororities, and to consider problems of mutual interest to its member organizations.”

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.: Founded December 4, 1906 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Its founders are known as the “Seven Jewels” and its principles are “manly deeds, scholarship, and love for all mankind.” Its motto is First of All, Servants of All, We Shall Transcend All.

Alpha Phi Alpha evolved into a primarily service-oriented organization and provided leadership and service during the Great Depression, both World Wars, and during the Civil Rights Movement. The organization addressed (and still addresses) social issues such as apartheid, AIDS, urban housing, and other economic, cultural, and political issues of interest to people of color. The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial and World Policy Council are programs of Alpha Phi Alpha. It also conducts philanthropic programming initiatives with March of Dimes, Head Start, Boy Scouts of America, and Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.

Notable members of Alpha Phi Alpha: Jamaican Prime Minister Norman Manley, Nobel Prize winner Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Olympian Jesse Owens, Justice Thurgood Marshall, United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, singer Lionel Richie and Atlanta mayor Maynard Jackson.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.:Founded January 15, 1908 at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by a group of twenty students, led by Ethel Hedgeman Lyle.  Alpha Kappa Alpha was incorporated on January 29, 1913.

After the organization’s establishment over a century ago, Alpha Kappa Alpha has helped to improve social and economic conditions through community service programs. Members have improved education through independent initiatives, contributed to community-building by creating programs and associations, such as the Mississippi Health Clinic, and influenced federal legislation by Congressional lobbying through the National Non-Partisan Lobby on Civil and Democratic Rights. The sorority works with communities through service initiatives and progressive programs relating to education, family, health, and business.

Notable members of Alpha Kappa Alpha: actress Loretta Devine, actress Phylicia Rashad, author Toni Morrison,  and vocalist Cassandra Wilson.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.: Founded as Kappa Alpha Nu on the night of January 5, 1911 by ten African-American college students at Indiana University Bloomington.

The motto of the fraternity is, “Achievement in every field of human endeavor”. During this time there were very few African-American students at the majority white campus at Bloomington, Indiana and they were a small minority due to the era of the Jim Crow laws. Many African-American students rarely saw each other on campus and were discouraged or prohibited from attending student functions and extracurricular activities by white college administrators and fellow students. African-American students were denied membership on athletic teams with the exception of track and field. The racial prejudice and discrimination encountered by the founders strengthened their bond of friendship and growing interest in starting a social group.

Some believe the Greek letters Kappa Alpha Nu were chosen as a tribute to Alpha Kappa Nu, but the name became an ethnic slur among racist factions. Founder Elder Watson Diggs, while observing a young initiate compete in a track meet, overheard fans referring to the member as a “kappa alpha nig”, and a campaign to rename the fraternity ensued. The resolution to rename the group was adopted in December 1914, and the fraternity states, “the name acquired a distinctive Greek letter symbol and KAPPA ALPHA PSI thereby became a Greek letter fraternity in every sense of the designation.” Kappa Alpha Psi has been the official name since April 15, 1915.

Notable Members of Kappa Alpha Psi: Gospel musician Byron Cage, comedian Cedric “The Entertainer” Kyles, and Civil Rights leader Ralph D. Abernathy.

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.:  Founded on November 17, 1911 by three Howard University juniors, Edgar Amos Love, Oscar James Cooper and Frank Coleman, and their faculty adviser, Dr. Ernest Everett Just. Omega Psi Phi is the first predominantly African-American fraternity to be founded at a historically black university.

Since its founding, Omega Psi Phi’s stated purpose has been to attract and build a strong and effective force of men dedicated to its Cardinal Principles of manhood, scholarship, perseverance, and uplift.

In 1924, at the urging of fraternity member Carter G. Woodson, the fraternity launched Negro History and Literature Week in an effort to publicize the growing body of scholarship on African-American history. Encouraged by public interest, the event was renamed “Negro Achievement Week” in 1925 and given an expanded national presence in 1926 by Woodson’s Association for the Study of Negro Life as “Negro History Week.” Expanded to the full month of February from 1976, this event continues today as Black History Month.

Since 1945, the fraternity has undertaken a National Social Action Program to meet the needs of African Americans in the areas of health, housing, civil rights, and education. Omega Psi Phi has been a patron of the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) since 1955, providing an annual gift of $350,000 to the program.

Notable members of Omega Psi Phi: poet Langston Hughes, comedians Rickey Smiley, Steve Harvey, and Bill Cosby.

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.: Founded on January 13, 1913, by 22 collegiate women at Howard University. These women wanted to use their collective strength to promote academic excellence and to provide assistance to persons in need. The first public act of Delta Sigma Theta was the Women’s Suffrage March in Washington D.C., March 3, 1913. Delta Sigma Theta was incorporated as a perpetual body in 1930. Today, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority is the largest African-American Greek-lettered organization.

Since its founding, Delta Sigma Theta has been at the forefront of creating programming to improve political, education, and social and economic conditions. Delta Sigma Theta has been pivotal in assisting the African American and International communities through education, lobbying, and economic initiatives, including Delta Days at the State and Nation’s Capitol, Delta Days at the United Nations, Summits and various conferences which focus on pertinent issues of the day. In addition to establishing independent programming, The Sorority consistently collaborates with community and corporate organizations Such as Chase (bank), Habitat for Humanity, Coca-Cola, Wal-Mart, Lawry’s, and General Electric to further its programming goals.

Notable members of Delta Sigma Theta: actress Keshia Knight Pulliam, singers Natalie Cole and Roberta Flack, and athlete Wilma Rudolph.

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students with nine other Howard students as charter members. The fraternity’s founders (A. Langston Taylor, Leonard F. Morse, and Charles I. Brown) wanted to organize a Greek letter fraternity that would exemplify the ideals of Brotherhood, Scholarship and Service while taking an inclusive perspective to serving the community as opposed to having an exclusive purpose.

The fraternity exceeded the prevailing models of Black Greek-Letter fraternal organizations by being the first to establish alumni chapters, youth mentoring clubs, a federal credit union, chapters in Africa, and a collegiate chapter outside of the United States, and is the only fraternity to hold a constitutional bond with a predominantly African-American sorority, Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ), which was founded on January 16, 1920, at Howard University in Washington, D.C., through the efforts of members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity.

Notable members of Phi Beta Sigma: George Washington Carver, James Weldon Johnson, Kwame Nkrumah, and activist Hosea Williams.

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.:  Founded on January 16, 1920 by five collegiate women (Arizona Cleaver Stemmons, Myrtle Tyler Faithful, Viola Tyler Goings, Fannie Pettie Watts, and Pearl Anna Neal) at Howard University. The organization was founded “on the simple belief that sorority elitism and socializing should not overshadow the real mission for progressive organizations – to address societal mores, ills, prejudices, poverty, and health concerns of the day.”

In 1948, Zeta Phi Beta became the first Greek-letter organization to charter a chapter in Africa (in Monrovia, Liberia). It was also the first organization to establish adult and youth auxiliary groups and centralize its operations in a national headquarters. Today, there are also chapters in U.S. Virgin Islands, Jamaica, Bahamas, Japan, Korea, Barbados, and Haiti.

Zeta Phi Beta is the only NPHC sorority that is constitutionally bound to a fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma. The sorority also maintains connections to several organizations including the NPHC, American Diabetes Association, March of Dimes, American Cancer Society, American Red Cross, National Council of Negro Women, and the United Negro College Fund.

The sorority also holdsZeta Day on the Hill, which provides an opportunity for Zetas to exercise another level of civic responsibility by learning the protocols for interacting with and the knowledge needed to maximize engagement with congressional representatives. As members of a “Community Conscious-Action Oriented” organization, Zetas schedule meetings with their representative or their representative’s designee to discuss, during brief sessions, issues of interest to the local, state and national Zeta membership.

On January 25, 2001, Zeta Phi Beta was granted Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) status with the United Nations.

Notable members of Zeta Phi Beta: author Zora Neale Hurston, singer Sarah Vaughan, comedienne Sheryl Underwood, singers Minnie Riperton and Towanda Braxton.

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.:  Founded on November 12, 1922 at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana by seven young educators. It was incorporated within the state of Indiana in December 1922 and became a national collegiate sorority on December 30, 1929, when a charter was granted and the Alpha chapter was established.

The sorority is a non-profit whose aim is to enhance the quality of life within the community. Public service, leadership development and the education of youth are the hallmark of the organization’s programs and activities.

Founded in the midst of segregation, Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. is the only sorority of the four historically African-American sororities in the NPHC that was established on a predominantly white campus.

Notable members of Sigma Gamma Rho: singer Kelly Price, rapper MC Lyte, and actress Victoria Rowell.

Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.: Founded on September 19, 1963 at Morgan State University (then Morgan State College) in Baltimore, Maryland. 

The fraternity was founded in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement even though there were already four other prominent historically Black fraternities at the time. Influences included organizations such as the Black Panthers, SNCC, and figures such as Malcolm X and Stokely Carmichael. The Iota founders were distinguished from their peers as they were all non-traditional students. Being anywhere from three to five years older than their peers, many had served in the military, worked full-time while attending classes full-time, and had families with small children. These elements gave the Founders a different perspective than the typical fraternity member.

A key appeal of Iota Phi Theta is that, as an organization, it refuses to have its members bind themselves to a defined fraternal image but celebrates the individuality of its members.

Notable members of Iota Phi Theta: actor T.C. Carson and athlete Calvin Murphy.

The importance of the “Divine Nine”: During the time in which the first BGLO was established, African Americans across the country were faced with the harsh realities of race-related discrimination. As a result of the various situations that stemmed from these discriminatory practices, various organizations established by the African American community began to surface and some of them were Black Greek Letter Organizations. Since 1906—the founding year of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.—nine fraternities and sororities (affectionately known as the Divine Nine) have had the privilege of developing and establishing chapters throughout the United States and the world. The establishment of these brotherhoods and sisterhoods brought together men and women who were passionate about the goals and ideals of their organization and made a commitment to work together to make a difference in the world in which they lived.

More than this, they gave networking opportunities and all of the other benefits of being a member of a Greek-Letter Organization to people who were barred entry from the historically White Greek-Letter Organizations. The NPHC organizations stand apart from all others in that at their core stand scholarship and service to the community.

I am a proud and active member of an NPHC sorority myself, the lovely, alluring, remarkable, and oh SOOOOOO SWEET Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. I love my organization, and I love my fellow black greeks…the history of all of our organizations shine brightly in all of our missions.

laugh.grow.change.[serendipity]

Everything worth doing takes time. You have to write a hundred bad songs before you write one good one. And you have to sacrifice a lot of things that you might not be prepared for. Like it or not, you are in this alone and have to follow your own star.
— 

Bob Dylan

Source

Movies I recommend

Hereby I would like to give you a list of movies I sincerely recommend you to watch, beside the ones that have already occurred in my other movie suggestion lists. They all have an impact on both psychological and philosophical levels and provoke a wide array of emotions and reactions that make you think and feel for real.

1. A Beautiful Mind

It was my favourite movie for long years and it is still high up. Shortly put it is the story of the discovery and evolution of the Nobel-prize winner mathematician John Nash’s mental illness, but it does it in such a mind-twisting manner and it contains so many lessons and models for how to deal with certain situations, how to fight and how to love.

Originally posted by insanemisunderstood

2. Requiem for a Dream

Shivers and mind-blown, that is what and how I felt after watching this movie. It presents the effects of intentional and non-intentional drug use and addiction in a way that certainly haunts you. Spoiler: it might make you feel afraid of your fridge.

Originally posted by cynicalcine

3. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

A beautiful, non-conventional, innovating love story that brings out the feels out of the viewer, even out of those that guard their feelings with skyscraping fences. You cannot let yourself not be invaded by deep emotions while watching it.

Originally posted by let--me--fly--you--to--the--moon

4. The Shawshank Redemption

The tale of hope and dignity triumphing over inhumane conditions, through the story of an escape from prison. It is a movie transmitting the importance of high moral virtues - the norm for a dignified human life.

Originally posted by best-movies-ever-made

5. (500) Days of Summer

I really appreciate the soundtrack of this movie. It is a love story which many can relate to, presented in a slightly unconventional manner which makes it stand out among similar themed movies. Listen to the music, sometimes it tells more than the lines of the characters.

Originally posted by meuqueridoamorplatonico

Celeb Women In The Signs

#internationalwomensday has passed, but there’s no reason it can’t be a woman-themed month, a woman-themed year, or a woman-themed life. In spirit, here are some cool celeb women born under each of our signs, plus I gave each sign a woman-positive quote I feel fits each of you zodiac sisters well. 

Aries: Selena (singer, born April 16, 1971), Maya Angelou (historical author, born April 4, 1928), Lady Gaga (singer, born March 28, 1986) 

“I’m tough, i’m ambitious, and I know exactly what I want. If that makes me a bitch, okay.” -Madonna

Taurus: Adele (singer, born May 5, 1988), Tina Fey (actress, born May 18, 1970), Grace Jones (caribbean star, born May 19, 1948), Nina Garcia (fashion journalist, born May 3, 1965)

“Women, if the soul of the nation is to be saved, I believe that you must become it’s soul.” -Coretta Scott King  

Gemini: Lauryn Hill (singer, born May 26, 1975), Heidi Klum (fashion designer, born June 1, 1973), Angelina Jolie (actress, born June 4,1975), Marilyn Monroe (actress, born June 1, 1926)

“Freedom, by definition, is people realizing that they are their own leaders”- Diane Nash

Cancer: Malala Yousafzai (nobel prize winner, born July 12, 1997), Frida Kahlo (painter, born July 6, 1907), Meryl Streep (actress, born June 22, 1949) (Wow! Lots of cool women are Cancers!!!)

“This is what my soul is telling me: Be peaceful and love everyone.” -Malala Yousafzai

Leo: Jennifer Lawrence (actress, born August 15, 1990), Jennifer Lopez (singer, born July 24, 1969), J.K. Rowling (author, born July 31, 1965), Halle Berry (actress, born August 14, 1966)

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”-Eleanor Roosevelt 

Virgo: Mother Teresa (charity founder, born August 26, 1910), Amy Poehler (actress born September 16, 1971), Taraji P. Henson (born September 11, 1970), Beyonce (singer, born September 4, 1981)

“If you’re in a movement and not following a woman of color, you’re following the wrong movement”- Linda Sarsour

Libra: Serena Williams (tennis player, September 26, 1981), Gwen Stefani (singer, born October 3, 1969), Margaret Thatcher (only female prime minister of the UK, born October 13, 1925), Lilly Singh (youtube star, born September 26, 1988)

“Apparently it’s better to be a corporation today than to be a woman in front of the supreme court.” -Cecil Richards 

Scorpio: Kathy Griffin (comedian, born November 4, 1960), Allyson Felix (olympic track and field medalist, born November 18, 1985), Marie Curie (first woman to win a nobel prize, born November 7, 1867), Scarlett Johansson (actress, born November 22, 1984)

“The truth will set you free but first it will piss you off.”- Gloria Steinem

Sagittarius: Sojourner Truth (historian, born December 1, 1797), Shirley Chisholm (first black woman to run in politics, born November 30, 1924), Britney Spears (singer, born December 2, 1981), Cicely Tyson (actress, born December 18,1924)

“Don’t underestimate how much antagonism there is toward women and how many people wish we could turn the clock back.” -Nora Ephron

Capricorn: Aaliyah (singer, born January 16, 1979), Betty White (comedian, born January 17, 1922), Michelle Obama (former first lady, born January 17, 1964)

“Men: their rights, and nothing more. Women: their rights, and nothing less.”-Susan B. Anthony

Aquarius: Jennifer Aniston (actress, born February 11, 1969), Ellen DeGeneres (comedian, born January 16, 1956), Oprah Winfrey (host, born January 19, 1954), Rosa Parks (civil rights activist, born February 4, 1913)

“Words actually matter. They’re significant, they can transform and open up our imagination for others.”- Opal Tometi

Pisces: Rihanna (singer, born February 20, 1988), Eva Longoria (actress, born March 15, 1979), Queen Latifa (actress, born March 18, 1970), 

“Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything evolves, everything flies and goes away.” -Frida Kahlo

radiohead’s assistant: “howdy boys we have good news and bad news what do you want first?”

radiohead: “bad news first so the good ones will soften the blow!”

radiohead’s assistant: “ok so bad news are that a bunch of artists made a letter calling u out and when i say artists i mean roger waters, thurston moore and even desmond tutu. u know, nobel peace prize winner desmond tutu”

radiohead: *trying v hard not to display emotion* “and… and the good ones?”

radiohead’s assistant: “y'all gave a new ant a name”

radiohead: oh.

The Great Polish Book Recs Post

@classic-literature-snob​ asked me for some Polish book recs, so here we go.

Polish books translated into English:

  • The Witcher Series by Andrzej Sapkowski (fantasy)
  • The Doll by Bolesław Prus (historical fiction: 19th century)
  • The Fictions/The Crocodile Street by Bruno Schulz (magic realism)
  • The Pianist by Władysław Szpilman (non-fiction: WWII; escaping from Warsaw Ghetto)
  • Who Was David Weiser? by Paweł Huelle (historical fiction: post-WWII)
  • On the Road to Babadag by Andrzej Stasiuk (contemporary)
  • A World Apart by Gustaw Herling-Grudziński (non-fiction: WWII; memories of a Gulag survivor)
  • Wedding by Stanisław Wyspiański (play; pretty heavy symbolism)
  • The Peasants by Władysław Reymont (historical fiction: late 19th century; Nobel prize winner)
  • The Shoemakers by Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz (play; magic realism)
  • Short stories by Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz (especially Friends & Lovers of Marona, if you can find those)
  • Like Eating a Stone by Wojciech Tochman (non-fiction; civil war in Bosnia)
  • Story For a Friend by Halina Poświatowska (kind of an autobiography)
  • Czesław Miłosz (poetry; Nobel prize winner)
  • Wisława Szymborska (poetry; Nobel prize winner)
  • Tadeusz Różewicz (poetry)
  • Zbigniew Herbert (poetry)

Books that haven’t been translated into English (yet):

  • Dobry by Waldemar Łysiak (contemporary)
  • Taksim* by Andrzej Stasiuk
  • Drach* & Król by Szczepan Twardoch (historical fiction)
  • literally anything by Miron Białoszewski (mostly poetry and diaries)
  • Czterdzieści i cztery by Wojciech Piskorski (fantasy/historical fiction)
  • Gnój by Wojciech Kuczok (contemporary)
  • Najgorszy człowiek na świecie by Małgorzata Halber (contemporary)
  • Kobieta nie-doskonała by Sylwia Kubryńska (contemporary)
  • Inne pieśni by Jacek Dukaj (sci-fi)
  • Śmierć w Breslau by Marek Krajewski (crime story/historical fiction)
  • Jeżycjada by Małgorzata Musierowicz (contemporary, YA)
  • Tango by Sławomir Mrożek (play, contemporary)
  • Siekierezada by Edward Stachura (magic realism)
  • Akademia Pana Kleksa by Jan Brzechwa (kids lit)

*available in German

These are some of my favorites. Feel free to reblog and add yours!