nobel prize winner's

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built five hundred feet into the permafrost of a norwegian island located some six hundred miles from the north pole (and twice that from oslo), the svalbard global seed vault is the world’s largest and most secure seed bank. 

safe from earthquake and flooding, and designed to last a thousand years, its mission is to serve as a backup for planet’s agriculture in the event of a catastrophe, be it from drought, floods, disease, war (see: syria) and/or the slow moving disaster of climate change.

known as the doomsday vault, it has amassed over 840,000 seed samples since the first deposit, that of rice seeds, was made in 2008 by the late kenyan environmental activist and nobel peace prize winner, wangari maathai. 

since then, all countries, save japan and china (the later of which is believed to have already lost 90 percent of its rice varieties) have entrusted the site with their agricultural heritage, and the collection, as of now, covers about half of the world’s known crop diversity. 

A Dozen Women Scientists You’ve Never Heard Of

Dr. Alice Hamilton: pioneer in industrial medicine in the U.S
Dr. Florence Rena Sabin: pioneer in the movement to change the aim of medical study from the cure to the prevention of disease.
Dr. Lise Meitner: Pioneer in nuclear physics. First scientist to recognize that the atom could be split to release tremendous amounts of energy.
Dr. Leta S. Holilngworth: Pioneer in the science of clinical psychology. An early fighter for women’s rights.
Dr. Rachel Fuller Brown: Chemist. Co-discoverer of the antibiotic nystatin, the first antibiotic effective against fungus diseases.
Dr. Gladys Anderson Emerson: The first to isolate vitamin E from wheat germ oil and study its functions. Studied the possible relationship of nutrition to cancer and arteriosclerosis.
Dr. Maria Goeppert Mayer: Nobel Prize winner in physics fro her shell theory of the nucleus of the atom.
Dr. Myra Adele Logan: Pioneer in medicine. First woman surgeon to operate on the heart. First black woman to be elected a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons
Dr. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin: Nobel Prize winner in chemistry in 1964. Determined the structure of important chemical compounds of the body by cyrstallography.
Dr. Jane C. Wright: Pioneer of chemotherapy. First black woman to be appointed to a high post in medical administration.
Dr. Rosalyn S. Yalow: Nobel Prize winner in medicine, 1977, for her discovery of radioimmunoassay
Dr. Sylvia Earle Mead: Marine biologist who led the first US team of female aquanauts in the Tektite Underwater Research Project 

Things Said/Heard at Rocky Horror Rehearsal

Note: due to the nature of RHPS, a lot of these are somewhat risque, albeit in a sorta cracky way. Nothing here has to lead to direct NSFW, but doing so would be pretty easy. (So’s Janet!)

  • “It’s okay. My lungs are still in my body. I’m good.”
  • “I have plans for your fake dick.”
  • “It doesn’t matter! Nothing matters! Just form a kickline!”
  • “Please yourselves. Not literally. At least, not on stage.”
  • “This is why we keep the feather boas in quarantine.”
  • “You- you’re a lot. I like you.”
  • “This is when you start to get groovy.”
  • “I could kiss you. I could marry you. I could buy you ice cream.”
  • “IT’S WEDNESDAY NIGHT. WHO’S READY TO GET SLUTTY?”
  • “Shit, I thought this was water polo practice.”
  • “Biochemical research gets me so hot.
  • “This is the weirdest aerobics session I’ve ever seen.”
  • “I claim my prize.”
  • “I haven’t been this aroused since Nixon was president.”
  • “Where are the horses? I thought there would be horses.”
  • “I need you to channel your inner vodka aunt. I need you to channel your inner 10,000 vodka aunts.”
  • “Make it weirder. I know it’s weird. But make it weirder.”
  • “You’re, like, a sex god. You’re like a Nobel Prize winner sex god.”
  • “I like to approach all my problems crotch-first.”
  • “Okay, who here knows the Funky Chicken?”
  • “I’m so proud of you. You’re going to make me cry.”
  • “Anyone have a tampon?”
  • “Anyone have a hair band?”
  • “Anyone have any idea what’s going on?”
  • “There will be no actual nudity and no actual murder-cannibalism- at least, if everything goes according to plan.”
  • “Where’s the glitter and why is everyone sober?”
  • “Don’t worry about me. I’m having a good time.”
  • “You fuck with my boas, I will fuck with you.”
  • “It’s all cool. Nothing is on fire. Yet.”
  • “We’re allowed to step on you if you’re in the way.”
  • “OH SHIT MY TITS ARE OUT”
  • “I’m glad that we dream about each other in the worst possible ways.”
  • “It’s awful. I love it.”
  • “You. Me. Selfie. Now.”
  • “Feel this fabric. Now imagine it rubbing against your nipples. Frantically.”
  • “We are not responsible for any weird boners you may get this evening.”
  • “You guys, I just- I just love you so much. I’m so happy. You guys.”

“i’m gonna marry you.”

it’s not the first time kara’s said it, but lena feels her cheeks flush anyways. she focuses on the road in front of her, the feel of the steering wheel underneath suddenly sweaty palms. 

“alright, dear.” lena takes a chance side-glance at her girlfriend and finds kara all soft smiles, something secret and intimate brewing between the two of them. 

“alright,” kara repeats. she turns, palm under her head and elbow on the door as the open breeze whips her golden curls around. the moment feels new, feels real. lena turns up the radio and smiles, wishes for time to come to a standstill. 

.

“i’m gonna marry you.”

kara’s breath is hot against her ear and lena can feel their heartbeats syncing as one. she breathes deep through her nose, runs her fingers through damp hair. kara lounges on her chest and seems content to just lie there forever - and lena doesn’t really mind. kara is made from the stars and lena holds the universe on her chest. 

“and i’m gonna marry you.” lena whispers this into the night air, the room still sticky with heat. there’s a hitch in kara’s breath, slight, subtle, but a hitch nonetheless. 

“i look forward to it.” a wet kiss is placed below lena’s jaw then, followed by a trail of more hungry ones, and lena holds onto broad shoulders, wonders what salt tastes like on a hungry tongue. 

.

“i’m gonna marry you.” kara says it like she’s going to make a stop at the grocery and is asking lena what kind of milk she wants. 

this time, there’s no surprise, only the warmth of familiarity that seeps through lena’s veins at those words of endearment. 

“i know,” lena jokes. she doesn’t look up from the email that she’s typing up. “tmz is doing a countdown for the big proposal.”

across the living room, kara sticks her tongue out at her and rolls her eyes. lena continues to type and for a while, the only sounds of the apartment are the click clack of a keyboard and the shuffling of kara’s papers. 

“you’d still say yes, right?” 

lena looks up momentarily. “what?” she asks. 

there’s a hesitancy to the slope of kara’s shoulders. “you would still say yes, right? if i asked to marry you?”

lena lets out a soft laugh - nothing intimidating or loud, just soft - and sits back in her chair, catches her girlfriend’s honest gaze with her own, “my dear, i’d follow you to the ends of the universe and back, you know that.”

this seems to soothe kara, who returns back to her books at hand. “alright,” she says as she pushes up her glasses. “just checking.”

.

“i’m gonna marry you.” 

kara is crying, big, uncontrollable silent sobs down her cheeks. lena feels her own eyes well up in return; seeing kara in all her sadness never made for a dry eye between the both of them. 

kara lies on the deo bed under sunlamps. and lena luthor is a child prodigy, a genius billionaire, a nobel peace prize winner and a forbes 30 under 30, but she will never understand the deepness of kara’s sorrow, the cuts and the space that kara’s mind occupies where no sunlight can reach. she tries. lena tries hard, and it’s times like these where she can only do so much but hold kara’s hand a pray for the sunrise to come quick. 

lena’s mouth is dry when she speaks. “you’re gonna marry me,” she whispers, urges, promises, “you’re gonna marry me, and i’m gonna marry you, and you’re gonna have something steady to call your own.”

kara cries harder at this, tears streaming and silent heaves, but it’s enough. it’s enough for now, and it’s a promise of forever. 

.

“i’m gonna marry you.”

and kara does. kara and lena exchange vows under a setting sun with matching bracelets on their arms and a song in their hearts and kara and lena marry each other when the world is turning into a new day and their beginning is just reaching the first page. lena marries kara and they sit on a rooftop at the end of the night, look into the constellations of stars and eons and legends and they find a home among the infinite, a peace among the unknown. 

.

What I find fun is that only 10% of my coursemates, in a highly regarded writing BA, are male. Yet 75% of our professors are male (you have to be widely published to apply for professorship for starters), over 90% of Nobel literature prize winners are male. Only 2 women have won the best original screenplay Oscar in the last 25 years. 4 have won best adapted screenplay in the same timeframe, 2 of which were co-wins with male writers. I mean fuck, look at Wonder Woman: all five credited writers are men. I’ve been told that if I get published as a novelist, I should consider using a pen name or my initials (like JK Rowling did), that way people aren’t scared off by a woman writing science fiction. I can improve my sales noticeably by tricking people into assuming I’m a man.
When I switched from Engineering into Writing, I was told by so many people that it was a shame because we need more women in engineering. That may be true, but we need more successful female writers too. We need more successful women full stop.

The Great Polish Book Recs Post

@classic-literature-snob​ asked me for some Polish book recs, so here we go.

Polish books translated into English:

  • The Witcher Series by Andrzej Sapkowski (fantasy)
  • The Doll by Bolesław Prus (historical fiction: 19th century)
  • The Fictions/The Crocodile Street by Bruno Schulz (magic realism)
  • The Pianist by Władysław Szpilman (non-fiction: WWII; escaping from Warsaw Ghetto)
  • Who Was David Weiser? by Paweł Huelle (historical fiction: post-WWII)
  • On the Road to Babadag by Andrzej Stasiuk (contemporary)
  • A World Apart by Gustaw Herling-Grudziński (non-fiction: WWII; memories of a Gulag survivor)
  • Wedding by Stanisław Wyspiański (play; pretty heavy symbolism)
  • The Peasants by Władysław Reymont (historical fiction: late 19th century; Nobel prize winner)
  • The Shoemakers by Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz (play; magic realism)
  • Short stories by Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz (especially Friends & Lovers of Marona, if you can find those)
  • Like Eating a Stone by Wojciech Tochman (non-fiction; civil war in Bosnia)
  • Story For a Friend by Halina Poświatowska (kind of an autobiography)
  • Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz (historical fiction: Roman Empire; beginnings of Christianity; Nobel prize winner)
  • The Trilogy (With Fire and Sword, The Deluge & Sir Michael) by Henryk Sienkiewicz (historical fiction: 17th century; respectively: the Khmelnitsky Uprising, the Swedish invasion, also known as the Deluge & war against Ottoman Empire)
  • Solaris by Stanisław Lem (sci-fi)
  • The Stranger by Maria Kuncewiczowa (psychological)
  • Czesław Miłosz (poetry; Nobel prize winner)
  • Wisława Szymborska (poetry; Nobel prize winner)
  • Tadeusz Różewicz (poetry)
  • Zbigniew Herbert (poetry)

Books that haven’t been translated into English (yet):

  • Dobry by Waldemar Łysiak (historical fiction: PRL)
  • Taksim* by Andrzej Stasiuk (contemporary)
  • Drach* & Król by Szczepan Twardoch (historical fiction)
  • literally anything by Miron Białoszewski (mostly poetry and diaries)
  • Czterdzieści i cztery by Wojciech Piskorski (fantasy/historical fiction)
  • Gnój by Wojciech Kuczok (contemporary)
  • Najgorszy człowiek na świecie by Małgorzata Halber (contemporary)
  • Kobieta nie-doskonała by Sylwia Kubryńska (contemporary)
  • Inne pieśni by Jacek Dukaj (sci-fi)
  • Śmierć w Breslau by Marek Krajewski (crime story/historical fiction)
  • Jeżycjada by Małgorzata Musierowicz (contemporary, YA)
  • Tango by Sławomir Mrożek (play, contemporary)
  • Siekierezada by Edward Stachura (magic realism)
  • Akademia Pana Kleksa by Jan Brzechwa (kids lit)
  • Wakacje z duchami by Adam Bahdaj (YA; detective story)
  • Pan Samochodzik i templariusze and the rest of the series by Zbigniew Nienacki (YA; detective story)
  • Kamienie na szaniec (non-fiction: WWII)

*available in German

These are some of my favorites. Feel free to reblog and add yours!

Barack Obama Day

So I Know That August 4th Is Now Officially Known As Barack Obama Day In Illinois But Can We Make It That Day Everywhere? Even If It’s Unofficially Official.

Movies I recommend

Hereby I would like to give you a list of movies I sincerely recommend you to watch, beside the ones that have already occurred in my other movie suggestion lists. They all have an impact on both psychological and philosophical levels and provoke a wide array of emotions and reactions that make you think and feel for real.

1. A Beautiful Mind

It was my favourite movie for long years and it is still high up. Shortly put it is the story of the discovery and evolution of the Nobel-prize winner mathematician John Nash’s mental illness, but it does it in such a mind-twisting manner and it contains so many lessons and models for how to deal with certain situations, how to fight and how to love.

Originally posted by insanemisunderstood

2. Requiem for a Dream

Shivers and mind-blown, that is what and how I felt after watching this movie. It presents the effects of intentional and non-intentional drug use and addiction in a way that certainly haunts you. Spoiler: it might make you feel afraid of your fridge.

Originally posted by cynicalcine

3. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

A beautiful, non-conventional, innovating love story that brings out the feels out of the viewer, even out of those that guard their feelings with skyscraping fences. You cannot let yourself not be invaded by deep emotions while watching it.

Originally posted by let--me--fly--you--to--the--moon

4. The Shawshank Redemption

The tale of hope and dignity triumphing over inhumane conditions, through the story of an escape from prison. It is a movie transmitting the importance of high moral virtues - the norm for a dignified human life.

Originally posted by best-movies-ever-made

5. (500) Days of Summer

I really appreciate the soundtrack of this movie. It is a love story which many can relate to, presented in a slightly unconventional manner which makes it stand out among similar themed movies. Listen to the music, sometimes it tells more than the lines of the characters.

Originally posted by meuqueridoamorplatonico

What is the point in worrying oneself too much about what one could or could not have done to control the course one’s life took? Surely it is enough that the likes of you and I at least try to make our small contribution count for something true and worthy. And if some of us are prepared to sacrifice much in life in order to pursue such aspirations, surely that is in itself, whatever the outcome, cause for pride and contentment.
—  Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day