no really this is the whole game

AG: I think the game knows it’s always gonna 8e played 8y kids, and it always rigs it so they enter right around the cusp of sexual maturity, whatever the race is.
AG: Which kinda makes sense, since if they succeed, they’ve got their whole lives ahead of them to do whatever the hell they’re going to do in their universe, like start repopul8ing and whatnot.
AG: That means the game also knows it’s got to deal with all these damn kids who are coming of age while playing it!
AG: I really think how successfully they mature is tied to success in the game. It challenges the players in all the ways they need to 8e challenged to grow, which is different for every individual, and veeeeeeeery different for every race.
AG: I don’t think we were so hot at that aspect of the game. In fact, I’m sure we were quite awful. Hell, even I wasn’t that gr8 at it! I actually just kinda fell ass 8ackwards into the god tier, to 8e honest.

anonymous asked:

WATCH KEMONO FRIENDS

i’ve heard good things about it, and i think the whole circumstances surrounding it - a low-budget mobile game gets an anime adaptation, but the anime gets trapped in development hell until after the game is taken down, only for the anime to become much more successful than the game ever was - are really funny, so i’ll give it a shot

anonymous asked:

You know, I just saw your post about the whole Genji and Mercy thing, and really, it sounds like double standards that they don't have chemistry in the lore meanwhile there's nothing that even supports Pharah and Mercy lore-wise and people jumped on it because of just game synergy. There also wasn't much retconning involving the story when there wasn't much story in the first place.

:/ Fam, with chu at the wheel, gen//////cy ain’t gonna have chemistry in or out of the game. secondly, ur right, there hardly is any lore at all and that’s also a problem and also blizzard’s fault. 

Okay so this one was one of the most fun, and yet terrible matches I ever played, but definitely the best Awilix game of my life. It started off with the Poseidon quitting the game less than 10 minutes in, after dying 3 times pretty much in a row. The Neith was clearly completely clueless how to play Smite, she didn’t buy a single item all game. Nothing. No pots, no relics, nothing. I tried to be polite, I got on the mic and asked if they needed help figuring out what or how to buy, but I wss just ignored so we left them in lane and they literally cleared minions in dual lane for 70 minutes, and that was it. So it was me, Vulcan, and Sobek (which to be fair, is really an Awilix dream team). And the whole game was just a fight, from start to finish. It was a 70 minute game, and neither team took a gold fury, or fire giant, everyone just grouped, picked a lane, and we 3v5ed the first half of the match. They actually got our all our phoenixes down about 30 minutes in, and we stood in our base for another 30 minutes and fought them off, we would try and take a tower, retreat, try and take another, until we finally wiped the team and managed to take the titan. And the worst part was the Poseidon actually (somehow) decided to come back in the last 5 minutes of the game, after leaving us hanging for an hour, so he didn’t even get a deserter penalty. It was definitely a once in a lifetime game for me.

Helpful guide to fully enjoy your Final Fantasy XV experience
  1. Watch Brotherhood  → Play Chapter 1 of FFXV  → Watch Kingsglaive  → Play the rest of the game!
  2. Sometimes the music overpowers the dialogue! Turn the music level down a bit so you don’t miss anything.
  3. Really take your time exploring Leide, Duscae and Cleigne regions ESPECIALLY before going off to Altissia!
  4. While in the Leide/Duscae/Cleigne areas: Camp in different spots to trigger different tours, take on some hunts (you’ll need the money), do a bunch of side quests. Explore everywhere!
  5. SAVE A BUNCH OF PROMPTO’S PICTURES! Fill up your 150 slots.
  6. Grind and work on leveling up before Altissia.
  7. Be sure you’re emotionally ready for the 2nd half of the game. Stock up on tissues. Literally, I had anxiety playing through it the whole time.
  8. There are a few “horror game” elements in the later part of the game filled with a bunch of jump scares. Be prepared for that.
  9. Again, take it slow. Don’t be in a rush to finish it! You could be 40 hours in the game already and not finish it yet! That’s perfectly ok! You’re doing it right!
  10. Enjoy it! You’ve been waiting for this game! For some it’s been 10 years, while others maybe only discovered it more recently, either way have fun on your adventure through Eos, chocobros!
your fave is problematic: Zevran Arainai
  • he doesn’t show up in Inquisition
  • like come on we see every other love interest
  • show me your lovely face
  • all we get is a mention in one letter
  • one letter
  • please i need more Zevran

Do you really think Noct would take something as broken as you back…?

Those who know me, know that I tend to hurt the chars I like the most :’)  smts I think I’m like that fight club quote “I just want to destroy something beautiful”. Oh well. Another scene of imprisoned!Prompto. this time with Ardyn, torturing his mind more than his body. I think, this whole time frame will be also the dlc content of Prompto’s dlc. (for Gladio it’ll be when he’s gone to do “his business” n for Iggy,… the time in Altissia is a bit too short despite the heavy impact it had. So maybe smth of the 10 years he had to learn to deal with his blindness? #Dardevil!Ignis)

Another piece that broke my back n that I like quite a lot. Hence, you can find it in my Etsy shop ;)

You know what it just occurred to me I’d really like to see in a tabletop RPG?

A setting that pairs the milieu of gonzo post-cyberpunk with the tone and themes of romantic fantasy.

Reframe extreme body modification via cybertechnology as an act of self-affirmation, rather than self-destruction.

There’s a whole ecosystem of little robo-critters gone feral, but they’re not dangerous -  they’re friends.

Everybody gets quirky AI companions.

Also, somehow there are unicorns.

okay but while we’re talking about even being Extra™️, we have to address that kosegruppa meeting and the fact that literally nothing will ever be funnier than how transparently even was just there to meet isak

here he is arriving, being greeted by vilde and the girls

and okay, nothing really amiss, just a nice profile view while he bounces on his heels adorably and lets vilde give her welcome spiel, all v cute and polite

but then, less than one second later

he starts clocking the crowd to see if isak did in fact show up

ah. there he is.

only one thing to do: turn your head as far as you can to see him while still technically only looking out of the corner of your eye for the ~nonchalant effect. if you’re feeling really fancy, maybe throw in the Jaw Thing™️ to show off your ¾ profile, and also so you don’t grin like a fool and give the whole game up

and then alright fast forward a bit. even refocuses on vilde enough to grab a delicious-looking roll, and he makes it up the stage steps to take a seat without doing anything totally obvious or desperate like brushing against isak’s leg or leaning forward to whisper something to him or anything. looks like we might be back on the cool track!

oh wait

what’s this you say? a group exercise about feelings and holding hands?

better stand in place and stare at him for a good two seconds while you mentally chart out the most direct yet suave route that will ~conveniently leave the two of you, wow, standing next to each other? oh my gosh how did that happen?? guess we’ll just have to hold hands now, don’t ask me, i don’t make the rules here ;)

in summary: even bech næsheim went to kosegruppa to do two (2) things, 1) eat fresh-baked bread and 2) finally make a move on Cute Boy, and he finished that roll a long ass time ago

2

“I’m trying to figure out the whole damn thing myself. I’m just confused. I have anxiety about the whole thing. You wake up every morning and think, what now? What stupid thing’s going to be said? What new email hack are you going to read about? What racist comment? A lot of my songs come from…not really anger, but anxiety. And feeling lost in the whole game.” -Billie Joe Armstrong

You’ve heard of JonTron, now get ready for...

Alpharad, a YouTuber with a similar vibe to his comedy, but without the problematic views and bigotry! He’s a smaller channel with regular game-related content. As a starting point, let me recommend his video “Pokemon Sun: The Whole Game in 20 Minutes!” because it was the hardest I’d laughed at something in a while and really sold me on the channel as a whole.

Go forth, lovelies, and enjoy A+ content made by A+ creators.

quetzalrofl  asked:

Why did the guys that wrote up things like the bag of devouring or those insta-kill flesh-boring worms hate DnD players so much?

(With reference to this post here.)

That’s actually a really fascinating question whose answer touches on not only the history of Dungeons & Dragons as a game, but some fairly fundamental issues regarding the tabletop roleplaying hobby as a whole.

Folks who have only casual contact with the tabletop roleplaying hobby tend to have a pretty standard idea of what’s involved: enter dungeon, kill monsters, get treasure, rinse and repeat.

For some games, Dungeons & Dragons among them - as its name suggests - that’s broadly true. However, there can be substantial disagreements between games - including the various editions of Dungeons & Dragons itself - regarding how players are expected to go about achieving these goals, and even what the basic process of play is supposed to look like.

Naturally, individual groups can play the game however they want. By nature, however, even the simplest game rules encode a vast array of assumptions about how the game ought to be played. For brevity, I’m going to call this body of baked-in assumptions a game’s default or assumed mode of play.

As noted, different editions of D&D have very different assumed modes of play, to the extent that Dungeons & Dragons basically isn’t one game, but half-a-dozen completely different games that just happen to share a title and a handful of common terminology.

Of course, the fundamental activity of D&D generally remains “enter dungeon, kill monsters, get treasure”, so the question of what D&D’s assumed mode of play is reduces to a more focused question: what is a dungeon? There are about five different answers to that question, each reflecting broad trends in the tabletop roleplaying hobby as a whole.

1. A Dungeon is a Logistical Puzzle

Though D&D has a lot of superficial trappings lifted directly from Tolkien, at its inception the internal nuts and bolts of the game were much more strongly informed by the swords-and-sorcery fiction of the 1960s and early 1970s: writers like Fritz Leiber, Michael Moorcock, and Jack Vance.

One of the common threads in the genre is that your typical swords-and-sorcery adventure is basically a heist narrative: a group of highly skilled professionals, each with their own signature specialty, must combine their talents to break into a secure location and steal some desired object without being apprehended. Think Ocean’s Eleven with evil wizards.

Early D&D - or OD&D, for brevity - followed largely in these footsteps. Each dungeon was essentially a logistical puzzle: how can the party marshal their resources to extract the treasure from the dungeon as efficiently as possible?

Unlike many later tabletop RPGs, experience points in OD&D were awarded primarily for recovering treasures, not for killing monsters, so combat was something of a failure state - a high-risk, low-reward activity to be avoided wherever possible. It was preferable by far to trick, sneak or fast-talk your way past the monsters; indeed, the desire to have fast-talking always be an option is the reason that most D&D monsters are intelligent and capable of speech, even the really weird ones - a quirk that would carry forward into most later iterations of the game. Out-of-combat activities had a formal rounds-and-turns structure, just as combat did, creating a constant time pressure with the threat of the dreaded Random Encounter Table hanging over players who might otherwise prefer to dally.

The drawback to this heist-style mode of play is that it’s extremely demanding on the GM (that’s “Game Master”, for those just tuning in - i.e., the person who’s running the game); in order to play this style of game effectively, scenarios need to be very carefully designed, and running them demands keeping track of a great deal of information. Among many groups, there was a natural tendency to de-emphasise the logistical big picture in order to focus on overcoming individual set-piece obstacles, which leads us to…

2. A Dungeon is an Obstacle Course

In order to fully understand how this mode of play developed, you have to bear in mind that Dungeons & Dragons started out as a hack for tabletop wargames - the earliest rulebooks explicitly positioned it as a fantasy roleplaying “overlay” that could be added to your wargame of choice, rather than as a standalone game - and for the bulk of its early history, wargaming clubs remained its primary venue of play.

It’s for this reason that, once D&D had become popularised, the question of how to play it competitively arose. This might sound like a very strange notion to modern gamers - competitive roleplaying games? - but it seemed perfectly obvious at the time.

In order to avoid damaging the game’s party-based structure with infighting, rather than having individual players compete against each other, the approach that was eventually settled upon was to hold tournaments at gaming conventions, where several groups would be run through the same adventure in parallel. Some tournaments emphasised speed of play, while others awarded points for completing specific objectives, prefiguring the ideas of both speed-running and video game achievements by some decades. However, the variant that emerged as by far the most popular was the survival module.

A survival module was a pre-written adventure that, unlike others, was not actually expected to be completed. A typical survival module consisted of a relatively linear series of extraordinarily deadly obstacles, many of them blatantly unfair, intended to kill player characters as quickly as possible. Each player would typically be allocated more than one character, with replacement characters dropped in as the current one expired (e.g., like lives in a video game); the tournament’s winning group would be the one whose last surviving character’s corpse hit the ground furthest from the dungeon entrance.

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st Edition (which is actually the third iteration of the game, owing to its somewhat muddled early chronology) was the child of this era of play. It’s here that the screwjob monsters and magic items discussed in the previous post came into their own - and in context, it’s easy to see why! Many of the era’s infamously deadly pre-written adventures were originally survival-based tournament modules, repackaged and sold in hobby stores with no indication of their original purpose, which inadvertently helped to popularise that style of play among players outside the tournament scene.

Further developments aren’t strictly germane to the question, so I’ll touch on them only briefly:

3. A Dungeon is a Story Path

The “dungeon as obstacle course” mode of play would remain dominant throughout the life of the game’s 1st Edition and into the early part of the 2nd. However, changing trends in the tabletop roleplaying hobby - brought on in no small part by the unprecedented popularity of White Wolf’s “World of Darkness” games (i.e., Vampire: The Masquerade et al.) - created demand for more a narratively focused gaming experience. By the mid-1990s, Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition had shifted to adventures structured less like obstacle courses and more like Choose Your Own Adventure novels, with each room in the dungeon serving as a decision point in a branching narrative. Of course, not all adventures were created equal; many were derided for their penchant for “railroading”, essentially reducing the player characters to passive spectators to a story whose outcome was already determined.

Toward the very end of the 2nd Edition’s tenure, another shift began that leads us directly to…

4. A Dungeon is a Simulated Environment

If you’re playing a game where the walls have hit points, you’re playing this. Coming into its own in the game’s 3rd Edition, the major impetus of this mode of play is to provide a single, unified set of game mechanics that allows the dungeon to be treated as a simulated environment - a sort of Sim Dungeon, if you will. This unification extended beyond characters and monsters, to the extent that everything up to and including individual ten-foot sections of dungeon walls would be assigned its own traits - hit points, elemental resistances, etc. - to govern basic interactions. Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition was also the first iteration of the game to post-date mainstream Internet access, so this is where theorycrafting and competitive character-building - facilitated by the game’s emphasis on mechanical rigour - really took off.

It wouldn’t be Dungeons & Dragons without an abrupt shift in focus every few years, though, which is how we get…

5. A Dungeon is a Series of Tactical Set-Pieces

Motivated partly by a dissatisfaction with the 3rd Edition’s perceived tendency to emphasise theoretical character-building over actual play, the game’s 4th Edition pulled a hard 180. Returning to D&D’s roots as a modified tabletop wargame while incorporating elements of modern board games, this mode of play reenvisions a dungeon as a series of tactical set-pieces: carefully constructed combat scenarios that focus on heavily stylised map-based play with no pretence of simulating anything in particular. The GM’s role shifts from that of a supervisor or referee to that of an opposing player, and the tone departs from high fantasy to become more like that of a kung fu movie - the kind where people are leaping and being hurled all over the battlefield and calling out their special moves by name.

(This was, needless to say, a controversial move. Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition was perceived as hostile to its online community in many circles, and was widely derided as being too video-game-like in is execution - though ironically, most detractors compared it to completely the wrong genre of video games, failing to recognise that most of the elements they decried as MMO-isms had been borrowed by MMOs from earlier iterations of D&D in the first place. In practice, if video game comparisons are unavoidable, it plays more like a tabletop implementation of Disgaea or Final Fantasy Tactics.)

3

Idk if anyone had made this headcanon yet, but I present to you: NHL prospect Chris “Chowder” Chow.

Listen, NCAA hockey is no joke. So many of the best NHL players went NCAA first. You get to develop your game and go to school at the same time. And if Chowder is really as good as it seems, playing D1, you best bet he was on the radar for the NHL scouts.

He actually grew up a Boston Bruins fan, because both his parents are both from the Boston area originally. But right out of high school, before he came to Samwell, Chowder was drafted into the NHL. To the San Jose Sharks.

It explains his love on a whole new level. He’s more than just a hockey fan from California. He’s the chosen one of an NHL organization. Their top goalie prospect. The future of their team.

Just. NHL prospect Chowder.

Neon Noir

I was doing design for a card game company that will remain nameless. 

Client: I’m designing a “noir” card game. I’m going to need it to be colorful and have hardly any shadows. Can you do that? 

Me: I can do that, wouldn’t it not really be “noir” then? The whole point is limited colors and heavy shadow, isn’t it? 

Client: Yes, it would. Just figure it out. 

The whole “pineapple on pizza” thing really gets me. Like, every pizza aficionado in America has collectively agreed that this is the hill to die on.

Meanwhile, over in Italy (you know, where the thing was invented), when pizza purists throw down, it’s over stuff like potatoes.

Peas.

Tuna.

Freaking hard boiled eggs.

People come to blows over whether hard boiled eggs belong on pizza.

We need to step up our game, is what I’m saying.

I like the idea of there being a reporter at one of the games during the whole Minyard/Josten rivalry thing who speaks Russian and she’s sitting there like ‘holy shit’ as Andrew and Neil yell at each other across the court in Russian about dinner plans and how their cat, King, needs to be picked up from the vet tomorrow. During most of the press conference, she sits in silence, watching these two supposed rivals before finally speaking up. 

“Mr. Minyard, would you like to comment on the situation with your cats?”

Everyone else is really fucking confused and Andrew’s eyes narrow slightly before Neil bursts out laughing at the other end of the table. Andrew turns his glare on the opposing teams striker. Neil, still grinning widely, turns to the reporter and takes the question instead.

“King is at the vet because she decided to invite the neighbour’s cat to have a party while we were away and now she’s pregnant. It’s just a check up, so I’m picking her up tomorrow before Sir gets too lonely.” (you cannot convince me that King is not a female because she totally is)

And that is how the world found out the truth about the Minyard/Josten cats- I mean rivalry.