no pesticide

The bumblebee was officially added to the endangered species list.

 Please:

  • Go plant an organic flower native to wherever you are
  • Leave your “weeds” alone they probably aren’t hurting anything
  • Stop using/buying Roundup and all other insecticides, herbicides, pesticides. 
  • If you have a bee problem (which almost never happens) call a local beekeeper! They will remove them safely free of charge
  • Bumblebees usually nest underground and just wanna be left alone! They won’t hurt you. To prevent destroying their habit during hibernation, avoid mowing yards until April or May. If you do mow, raise the blades to the highest setting

Please save my fat clumsy fuzzy friends I love them and they’re very good pollinators.

Hey so it’s almost springtime, which is swarming season for our bee friends!

Swarming is totally normal for a colony of bees so if you see something like this, don’t spray pesticides or harm the bees! It’s not dangerous at all and they happen to very calm like this because they are not protecting a hive or a queen. If they are swarming near your house and need to be removed, call a beekeeper and let a professional take care of them.

Even if you’re scared or allergic to bees (like me), there’s no reason to harm these creatures when they’re naturally preparing for spring.
Make sure you spread this information around to protect the bees!

2

GMOs aren’t scary — pesticides are

  • Americans who care about food and health have wrung their hands worrying about genetically modified organisms in recent years.
  • GMO labeling dominated conversations in 2016, when Obama signed a GMO label law that will allow companies to use a QR code to disclose products with GMOs.
  • But worrying about GMOs, which most scientists deem to be safe for consumption, shouldn’t be keeping you up at night in 2017.
  • The scarier threat to public health? Pesticides.
  • Farmers use chemicals to kill organisms that feast on their crops, but these chemicals stay in soil and groundwater for decades — potentially endangering us and generations to come. Read more

follow @the-future-now

White oil aka MEALYBUG DEATH SPRAY

(also works on scale insects, spider mites, and other small sap-sucking insects)

This is my go-to DIY pesticide, and it really works for persistent mealybug/scale insect colonies…just…keep spraying…everyday… and in a week or two all the insects should be dead 💀

Ingredients:
4 parts vegetable oil
1 part dishwashing liquid (non-bleach!)

Pour into container and shake well until it turns white (as in photo)

To use:
Mix approx one tablespoon to one litre of water in a spray bottle, shake well, and spray onto insects. Shake well before every use !

It works by coating the insect with a thin film of oil/soap so they suffocate, so you have to make sure that it covers all insects thoroughly.

Caution:
Don’t use when temperatures will be above 32 deg c in the shade. Don’t spray just before your plants will be in harsh direct sun. Don’t spray directly before/after watering as it’s less effective (In fact if I’m spraying this on I won’t water for a couple days before and after)

For very bad infestations, I’ll take the plant out of the pot and remove as much soil as I can, and spray the entire plant (roots and all) everyday, while keeping it in the shade. Once I’m sure there’s no more insects or eggs I’ll pot the plant back up :)

If anyone has other DIY pest control methods, do let me know !

Pollution and toxic contamination know no boundaries, nor do the birds we care about at ABC. That’s why we’re so concerned about the bill introduced in the House of Representatives to terminate the Environmental Protection Agency and leave protection of “environmental assets” to the states.

In the words of Cynthia Palmer, our Director for Pesticides Science and Regulation, “We need national standards to keep the air and water safe for all of us. The states can play an important role in fine-tuning their environmental protections to address local needs. But we cannot expect each state to carry out the in-depth assessments needed on thousands of toxic chemicals, many of which are lethal to birds as well as to people. The proposal to axe the EPA is part of the unprecedented sellout of basic environmental protections to special interests.”

Please call your reps and ask that they not support H.R. 861 or any bill that undermines #EPA’s ability to protect the environment!

Photo of Lucy’s Warbler by Scott Olmstead/Flickr

Under appreciated Sangwoo theory

Sangwoo might be a gardener in his spare time. Or at least, he use to practice it. 

In chapter one we’re shown his tool box, the first removable section having an assortment of florist materials in the compartments. From what I can tell he has stem cutters, floral tape, stem tape, and maybe corsage pins. I can’t quite make out what’s in the back sections but from the yellow color, I think it’s safe to say it may be floral materials. 

This kit includes similar items! However it excludes an important tool, the stem cutters. His are yellow, which means that they’re Oasis brand, aka one of the top brands in the florist community. 


In chapter four we’re shown a briefing of his pantry. 

In the top shelves, he has what looks like floral foam and what could possibly be plant feed or pesticides. 

The hue even seems to match the Oasis brand of floral foam (seeing has how many brands differ in color), though that could be a bit of a stretch. 

Just a bit of icing on the cake, but in many images Koogi has given to us of Sangwoo (our newest one being the teenage Sangwoo), there are depictions of flowers. 

This could also be something he use to do with his mom, seeing as how all of the plants in his home are dead - and he still holds onto a lot of things from his childhood, so why not this?

I could of course be wrong, but seeing as how a lot of the arrows point to this, let’s cross our fingers to see some more insight on this in season two!! 

anonymous asked:

um, so lets say that letting loose a whole bunch of animals onto the planet wasn't a problem. the pesticides, fertilizers, and poisons that agricultural farmers set/spray would be detrimental to water supplies, and would pollute groundwater, so really, being vegan would be just as bad as being a meateater if the whole world were to participate.

…I’m sorry what? Why exactly are we letting loose a whole bunch of animals and increasing our pesticide use? Those are some pretty massive assumptions right off the bat. First of all, if the world went vegan it’d happen over time, we wouldn’t suddenly have 60 billion farmed animals roaming the streets. As demand goes down, so does the number of animals being bred to fulfill that demand, which is basic economics. The ones who do remain can comfortable live out their lives in sanctuaries, as the lucky few already do.

As for pesticides, I think you must be assuming that if we all went vegan we’d need more vegetables to feed the population, but you’re very wrong about that. If we look at cows, for example, it takes 16 pounds of grain to make one pound of beef. That’s 94% more land, and 94% more pesticides than just eating that grain directly. All told, livestock consume 70% of all the grain we produce, 98% of all soy, and a fifth of all water consumed globally. Farmed animals take in far more calories in crop feed than they will ever give out in meat, meaning that they are literally detracting from the global food supply. If the world went vegan, we would add an addition 70% to the world’s global food supply.

All of this is also assuming that we would still be using pesticides and animal fertilizers, but by your own hypothetical the whole world is vegan, so why exactly would we be using products which harm animals? Plant ferifilisers are very effective and veganic farming already exists. It is not the case that crops can’t be grown without harming animals or people. I think if you’re really honest with yourself, the reason you aren’t vegan isn’t because “all the animals would be released and we’d use loads of pesticides if everyone went vegan", it’s because you like eating animals. I’d honestly prefer you just admit that instead of inventing these nonsensical straw man hypotheticals which waste everyone’s time.

Hey so it’s almost springtime, which is swarming season for our bee friends!

Swarming is totally normal for a colony of bees so if you see something like this, don’t spray pesticides or harm the bees! It’s not dangerous at all and they happen to very calm like this because they are not protecting a hive or a queen. If they are swarming near your house and need to be removed, call a beekeeper and let a professional take care of them.

Even if you’re scared or allergic to bees, there’s no reason to harm these creatures when they’re naturally preparing for spring.
Make sure you spread this information around to protect the bees!

From an EPA staffer:
“So I work at the EPA and yeah it’s as bad as you are hearing:
The entire agency is under lockdown, the website, facebook, twitter, you name it is static and can’t be updated. All reports, findings, permits and studies are frozen and not to be released. No presentations or meetings with outside groups are to be scheduled.
Any Press contacting us are to be directed to the Press Office which is also silenced and will give no response.
All grants and contracts are frozen from the contractors working on Superfund sites to grad school students working on their thesis.
We are still doing our work, writing reports, doing cancer modeling for pesticides hoping that this is temporary and we will be able to serve the public soon. But many of us are worried about an ideologically-fueled purging and if you use any federal data I advise you gather what you can now.
We have been told the website is being reworked to reflect the new administration’s policy.
Feel free to copy and paste, I am posting this as a fellow citizen and not in any sort of official capacity.”
If you share, please do so with copy and paste.“

  • problems with gmos: Monsanto literally trademarks strains of crops and uses their Trademarked™ Grain™ to exert more legal control over independant farmers and also prevents farmers from saving seeds to plant the next season. gmo alfalfa (fed to livestock) is resistant to pesticides/herbicides which gives it potential to be an invasive weed that is difficult to kill. It also negatively impacts farmers whose alfalfa may be tainted or affected by the spread of this strain and rejected by buyers overseas who do not allow gmos
  • NOT problems with gmos: they are unhealthy and killing bees