no pesticide

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GMOs aren’t scary — pesticides are

  • Americans who care about food and health have wrung their hands worrying about genetically modified organisms in recent years.
  • GMO labeling dominated conversations in 2016, when Obama signed a GMO label law that will allow companies to use a QR code to disclose products with GMOs.
  • But worrying about GMOs, which most scientists deem to be safe for consumption, shouldn’t be keeping you up at night in 2017.
  • The scarier threat to public health? Pesticides.
  • Farmers use chemicals to kill organisms that feast on their crops, but these chemicals stay in soil and groundwater for decades — potentially endangering us and generations to come. Read more

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🌸 Edible Flowers & Witchery 🌸

As a chef-in-training I love to use flowers in my cooking so why not witchcraft too! Flowers add a splash of colour, taste, and a little bit of whimsy. People have been using flowers in cooking all the way back to the Romans and ancient Greeks. Many cultures today still use them too; Indians use roses and Italians use artichoke flowers. The tastes also vary! Some add spice and others a sweetness.

Eating Flowers Safely

  1. Eat flowers you know are definitely edible - if you’re uncertain look in a reference book.
  2. Eat flowers you have grown your self or are consumption grade. Nurseries and florists commonly use pesticides on the flowers.
  3. Do not use flowers you have found at a park or near the edge of a road as they may be contaminated by car pollution and pesticides.
  4. Only eat the petals and remove the pistols and stamens before eating.
  5. To keep the flowers fresh place them on a wet paper towel and keep them in the fridge for up to 10 days.
  6. If your flowers wilt put in some ice water.

Flowers and Their Properties

  • Allium - Depends on which variety but means the same as the herb- All the flowers in the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible. Flavours go from leek to garlic. All parts of these plants are edible.
  • Angelica - Inspiration/protection - The colours of the flowers range from lavender all the way to a deep rose and have a licorice flavour.
  • Bachelor’s button -  Love - Grassy flavour. Dont eat calyx as it is very bitter.
  • Basil - Success/banishing - Very similar in taste to the basil leaf but milder in taste.
  • Borage - Courage - flowers are a lovely blue colour and they taste like cucumber.
  • Calendula - Love/joy - They taste spicy and have a vibrant golden colour.
  • Carnations - depends on colour but usually healing - Petals taste sweet but the base is very bitter.
  • Chamomile -  Peace - They have a sweet flavour much like the tea.
  • Chervil - Joy - The flowers are very delicate and have a slight anise flavour.
  • Chicory - Success - Slightly bitter and good for pickling.
  • Chrysanthemum - Relaxation - Come in a variety of colours and flavours which range from peppery to pungent. Use fresh.
  • Citrus - Depends which type of citrus but generally joy - Some of the flowers in the citrus family are edible (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, kumquat). They have a sweet flavour and have a very strong taste.
  • Clove - Protection/Manifestation - They are sweet with a touch of licorice.
  • Dill - Protection -  The lovely yellow flowers taste like the leaves.
  • English daisy - Luck - They are very bitter.
  • Fennel - Confidence/Protection - Beautiful yellow flowers with a licorice taste much like the herb.
  • Fuchsia - Love - They have a lovely tangy taste.
  • Gladiolus -  Strength/Beauty - Quite bland actually.
  • Hibiscus - Beauty -  Tastes like the tea with an interesting tart cranberry flavour.
  • Hollyhock - Ambition - Bland but are very pretty.
  • Impatiens - Motherly love - Dont have much flavour but are nice for decoration.
  • Jasmine - Romance - Have a nice sweet taste so they’re nice in sweet dishes.
  • Lavender - Relaxation - They are sweet and spicy and are great for both sweet and savoury dishes.
  • Lemon verbena - Beauty - The small white flowers taste like lemon.
  • Lilac - Beauty - They have a strong citrus flavour.
  • Mint - Protection - They taste minty.
  • Nasturtium - Victory - Very popular in cusine. They have a sweet, floral flavour and are also spicy.
  • Oregano - Protection - Same taste as the leaves but more subtle.
  • Pansy - Joy - Bland.
  • Radish - Protection - Very peppery.
  • Rose - Love - Very floral in taste which gets stronger the darker the flower is.
  • Rosemary - Memory - Milder rosemary taste.
  • Sage - Clearing - Taste similar to leaves.
  • Sunflower - Happiness - Dont really have a taste.
  • Violets - Happiness/Love - Floral taste.

As I am a baby witch all the correspondences might be wrong so please tell me if you would change anything.

I use flowers in salads, on cakes, in cakes, and I sometimes pickle them too so the options are endless!

Rose Petal PSA

I see a lot of witches drying rose petals for floral arrangements or even making rose water from them. Please keep in mind that roses grown for florists are over treated with pesticides and fertilizers. Anything made from these petals isn’t safe to ingest. 

If you’re doing work that requires making a rose preparation for ingestion or topical application that will be absorbed into the skin, you’ll want to get rose petals from a shop that sells for these purposes. 

Or grow your own organically. Old fashioned varieties rather than the hybrid teas you see in flower arrangements are usually grown for these purposes because they grown more easily without intense treatments. 

jumping on the “humans are space orcs” bandwagon, I’m just imagining what our food must look like to an outsider

like imagine trying to explain that we eat spoiled food. like, sometimes it grows bacteria on accident and we dislike it, but sometimes we deliberately expose it to bacteria so the exact same reaction can happen but for some reason this time we’re okay with it and call it stuff like “wine” and “cheese” and “yogurt”

we eat capsaicin, a natural pesticide and fungicide. and we think adverse reactions to it are so funny that we make videos that are just people eating extremely hot things.

we eat halite, a literal fucking rock, with such frequency that a dish is not considered properly seasoned without it.

turducken exists

2

EPA chief Scott Pruitt met with Dow Chemical CEO. Then the EPA changed course on a pesticide ban.

  • In March, Trump-appointed EPA Scott Pruitt had a private meeting with Dow Chemical CEO Andrew Liveris.
  • A few weeks later, Pruitt announced  the EPA would not continue a push to ban a common pesticide — one made and sold by Dow Chemical.
  • According to records obtained by the Associated Press, Pruitt and Liveris had a half-hour meeting at a Houston hotel on March 9.
  • Twenty days later, Pruitt announced that the EPA would not move forward on a petition to ban chlorpyrifos — a common pesticide that is widely used on produce in the United States — from being used on food.
  • Pruitt made the announcement despite the EPA’s own scientists concluding that “even minuscule amounts” of chlorpyrifos, when ingested, could interfere with fetal and infant brain development, the AP reported. Read more (6/28/17)

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anonymous asked:

I know you didn't say anything about hating vegans or anything but are we actually doing a bad job? like is all of this just a lie and not actually helping the environment or anything :/ because one of the biggest reason for me to go vegan is cause of environmental issues and all

I don’t hate vegans, not the ones that aren’t spreading misinformation or think they are on some sort of moral high ground to everyone else. But I don’t agree with it myself because it is all superficial, without any proper action if I’m being honest.

And when there is action it’s usually targeted at the wrong issue and does more harmful then good. My main issue is that vegans see animals as very individual. They want to save every single cow or pig or chicken without thinking about it rationally or about the horrible impact that would have no important species (species that are actually vital to ecosystems). Veganism fails to see the bigger more important picture. 

“Saving” domesticated farm animals is not important. I’m sorry but it’s just not. Not when it means “saving” these animals will have drastic negative effects. 

I mean there are always ways that agricultural and animal industries can be improved. But just refusing to buy meat or use animal products don’t change anything. And realistically we’re not going to stop eating meat or producing wool ect. You have to understand that and accept it and look at ways to improve those processes not try and shut them down completely.  

And more veganism just means more demand for certain crops, which require more land clearing + more pesticides ect. Veganism is just as bad for the environment and animals as any other diet is. In a capitalist society there really isn’t any ethical consumption.

The world and the environment can’t survive under a capitalist society. Capitalism is what’s stopping us from using green energy solutions or inverting more. Not because these solutions are “expensive” or hard to make or whatever use excuses are being made. It’s because they won’t make as much money as easily. 

Just like buying honey isn’t going to “save the bees” or turning the tap off when you brush your teeth won’t save water. They’re things corporations and company’s push because they’re easy and shift the blame onto consumers and away from them. 

We need to look into real solutions. Realistic solutions that aren’t just superficial I-want-to-feel-good-without-doing-anything-too-hard “solutions” but real ones. And they need to be towards actual important significant issues.  Animals being killed for a source of food or harvesting honey or wool, is not even close to being an issue we should be worried about. 

I’m sorry that you’ve been led to think otherwise, there is alot of misinformation out there and people will lie to get their agenda across. But veganism just doesn’t help the environment. It just doesn’t. 

White oil aka MEALYBUG DEATH SPRAY

(also works on scale insects, spider mites, and other small sap-sucking insects)

This is my go-to DIY pesticide, and it really works for persistent mealybug/scale insect colonies…just…keep spraying…everyday… and in a week or two all the insects should be dead 💀

Ingredients:
4 parts vegetable oil
1 part dishwashing liquid (non-bleach!)

Pour into container and shake well until it turns white (as in photo)

To use:
Mix approx one tablespoon to one litre of water in a spray bottle, shake well, and spray onto insects. Shake well before every use !

It works by coating the insect with a thin film of oil/soap so they suffocate, so you have to make sure that it covers all insects thoroughly.

Caution:
Don’t use when temperatures will be above 32 deg c in the shade. Don’t spray just before your plants will be in harsh direct sun. Don’t spray directly before/after watering as it’s less effective (In fact if I’m spraying this on I won’t water for a couple days before and after)

For very bad infestations, I’ll take the plant out of the pot and remove as much soil as I can, and spray the entire plant (roots and all) everyday, while keeping it in the shade. Once I’m sure there’s no more insects or eggs I’ll pot the plant back up :)

If anyone has other DIY pest control methods, do let me know !

Herbs ‘n’ Flowers

I use these more or less on the daily

Allspice: promotes healing, also attracts luck or money

Anise: help sleeping, no nightmares, protect against evil and protection in meditation

Basil: courage, protection, monetary success

Bay leaves: promotes healing, gain protection, instill strength

Cactus: maternal care, passion, endurance, strength/emotional strength

Caraway seeds: protect against negativity and strengthen memory

Chamomile: help induce sleep, combat curses and spells, aids in good health

Chives: courage, dispel disease and negative entities

Cinnamon stick: aids in healing, raises high spiritual vibrations

Clove: drive away negative/hostile forces, purify the area, produce spiritual vibrations

Earl Grey: bring clarity, bring good working to a space, attain courage and bring strength

Forget-Me-Not: love, remembrance, memory

Lavender: attracts love, induces sleep, bring peace/harmony, promotes happiness and protection

Lemon peel: attracts blessings and luck, attain success

Marigold: passion, creativity (also a natural pesticide)

Mint: fertility, happiness, protection

Nettle: promotes healing, protection, keep out evil

Orange peel: attract love, attain prosperity, attract good fortune

Peppercorn: protection, dispels evil especially when paired with salt

Peppermint: promotes healing, induces sleep

Raspberry leaves: gain protection (raspberry tea is phenomenal for menstrual and muscle cramps)

Rose hips: “love attracting beads”, promotes healing, obtain luck

Rosemary: gain of healing and protection, induce sleep, rid of negativity, drive away nightmares, aid in knowledge gain, and strengthen mental power

Sage: promotes wisdom, gain protection

Sea salt: purification, grounding, release emotional attachments, psychic protection, aids in healing

Spearmint: increases and sharpens mental powers, protection during sleep

Sunflower: sign of adoration, affection

Thyme: attracts good health, purifies space, gives courage and energy, aids in restful sleep

Vanilla: love..lots of love spells, also good in spells for domestic intentions

Edible Magickal Flowers and Folk Lore

The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greeks and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking, medicine, and magick.

 Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little magickal whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbaceous, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising. Flower petals can be used in salads and as garnish for desserts, but they also inspire magickal creative uses as well. Use them to make floral spirit water for rituals, as a medicinal tea, or add to a healing spell or love potion….  the possibilities are endless.

 TIPS FOR SAFE AND TASTY DINING:

  •        Not all flowers are edible (those listed below are safe for consumption) - As lovely as eating flowers can be, some can also be a little … deadly, so only eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants. (Always refer to the botanical name when verifying whether a flower is safe to eat.)
  •       Just because a flower is edible doesn’t mean it will taste good. Some will be more to your liking than others – it’s all a matter of taste. Keep in mind that the stamen, pistil and sepal of some blossoms are bitter and can contain pollen that may detract from the true flavor of the flower. Consuming only the petals will further heighten the appeal factor.
  •       Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
  •       Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
  •      Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
  •      If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
  •     To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.


1, Allium
All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful.  Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible. Garlic is masculine in nature and associated with the planet Mars, the element fire and the sign Aries. It is sacred to Hecate and is a suitable offering to her left at a crossroads.  Garlic has antibiotic properties, but should not be used directly on wounds or in poultices or salves because it can be irritating to the skin and may inhibit blood clotting.

2. Angelica
Depending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor. Believed to have originated in Syria, angelica is now found just about everywhere. In ancient times it was used to ward off the plague and evil and as a cure for poison and… well, just about everything else. Angelica is associated with the angels Michael and Gabriel. It is aligned with the sun and the element of fire and sacred to Venus. Angelica tea is useful for colic, gas, indigestion, hepatitis, heartburn, nausea, ulcers and various other digestive ailments.

3. Anise Hyssop
Both flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor. Anise is one of the oldest known plants that were grown for both culinary and medicinal use. Anise is associated with the element of air, the God Apollo, the planets Mercury and Jupiter, and the astrological sign Gemini. Anise is also considered masculine.

4. Basil
Blossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder. The word Basil comes from the Greeks, meaning “King”.  Basil is sacred to Vishnu, Tulasi and Erzulie, masculine in nature, and associated with the element of fire and the planet Mars. Basil helps steady the mind, brings happiness, love, peace, and money and protects against insanity.

5. Calendula / Marigold
A great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds a dash of magick to any dish. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans all loved calendula and used it for culinary and healing purposes. During the medieval period it was considered a cure for just about everything.  Marigold is associated with the Sun. Calendula symbolizes love and constancy.  It is great for wedding bouquets and decorations. It is the traditional “he loves me, he loves me not” flower and is useful for love potions. Dried petals can be strewn to consecrate an area or burned in consecration incense. They are also a good addition to dream pillows.

6. Carnations
Petals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.  In ancient Rome, carnations were known as “Jove’s Flower” as a tribute to their beloved king of the gods, Jupiter.  Carnations are masculine, associated with the Sun and Jupiter, and with the element fire.  Those things that fall under the rule of Jupiter are ideal for use in magickal applications related to luck, money, good fortune, status, legal matters, fertility, friendship, ambition, career, success and protection. The flowers can be used to lend strength in healing applications. The practitioner can also use carnation essential oils to increase health and vigor.

7. Chamomile
Small and daisy like, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.  The Romans used Chamomile for incense.  Chamomile was used in ancient Egypt for fevers and was dedicated to their Sun God Ra.  Chamomile is associated with the sun, Leo and the element of water. It helps cleanse and invigorate the throat chakra (5th). It is associated with various Sun Gods, including Cernunnos, Lugh and others.  It is used in spells for money, peace, love, tranquility and purification.

8. Chrysanthemum / Mum
A little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals. In Celtic folklore, chrysanthemums in the garden were considered a meeting place for the faeries. Chrysanthemum is masculine in nature and resonates with the energy of the Sun and the element of fire.  Chrysanthemum has been used for burial rituals and is a suitable decoration for Samhain and for ancestral altars.  The dried flower heads of chrysanthemum can be burned during house blessings ceremonies. 

9. Dandelion
The bright yellow flowers should be gathered as soon as they open. Remove the green bits from the base of the flower before using. These can be added to wines, vinegar or jellies. The name dandelion comes from the French, “dent de lion” which means “tooth of the lion”.  The dandelion is masculine in action and associated with the planet Jupiter, the element of air and both Pisces and Sagittarius. It is also associated with any solar deity, Hecate, Brigid and Belenos.  A tea of the flowers and leaves may be consumed to increase psychic ability, while pouring boiling water over a bowlful of roots will aid in calling spirits.   You can also make a wish and blow the seeds off a dandelion head.

10. Lavender
Sweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes. Some of the earliest recorded uses of lavender are by the Roman soldiers who used the wild-growing plant to perfume their bathwater and wash their clothes. Lavender is masculine in action and associated with Mercury. It is also associated with the element of air and the astrological sign Virgo. It may be used as an asperging herb (to sprinkle water for purification purposes) and dried lavender sticks or wands can be burnt like incense. It is also useful in spells to sharpen the mind, to encourage or strengthen pure love and to encourage fertility. The scent of lavender is relaxing and uplifting all at once making it a great aromatherapy for stressed out or depressed individuals. Try adding some lavender oil to your bath or add it to mild oil for a relaxing massage at the end of a hard day. Stuffing a pillow with lavender buds may help insomniacs relax and fall asleep and soothes headaches.

11.  Oregano
The flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf. Oregano is ruled by Venus and the element of air and associated with Aphrodite. It is used in spells for happiness, tranquility, luck, health, protection and letting go of a loved one. It can also be used in spells to deepen existing love. When worn on the head during sleep, it is said to promote psychic dreams. Oregano symbolizes joy. Use it for rituals celebrating joyful occasions, or in spells to bring joy into one’s life.

12.  Rose
Remove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties. From the time of Solomon, the rose has been the flower most closely linked with love. The rose was sacred to Venus, the Roman goddess of love, and was connected to her messenger, Cupid. Roses have been cultivated for over 5,000 years. Roses are associated with Aphrodite, Adonis and Eros. Rosewater is a protective agent worn on clothes. Rose petals can be added to charms against the evil eye.

13.  Rosemary
Flowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary. The word Rosmarinus is from the Latin meaning “dew of the sea”.  Rosemary is also associated with Aphrodite and appears in many ancient images of Her. Rosemary was used to ward off evil spirits and nightmares. The wood was used to make musical instruments. Rosemary is male in nature and ruled by Leo, the element fire and the sun (or Moon, depending who you ask).  It’s sacred to Hebe, Aphrodite and the Virgin Mary. Rosemary can be used in spells for fidelity and remembrance as well as to dispel jealousy. Rosemary is useful for ritual baths, and for making sacred herbal water for ritual cleansing, blessing and purification. Bathing in rosemary will enhance your memory.  

14. Sage
Blossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves. Sage is a hardy perennial of the mint family.  The Romans regarded sage quite highly and much sacrifice and ceremony was associated with its harvest. They believed it stimulated the brain and memory and used it to clean their teeth. Sage is masculine in nature and associated the element of air and the planet Jupiter. Sage is sacred to the Greek Zeus and Roman Jupiter. It is also a symbol of the Virgin Mary. Sage is used in magical workings for immortality, longevity, wisdom, protection and the granting of wishes. Sage is also believed to help alleviate sorrow of the death of a loved one.

15. Sunflower
Petals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke. Sunflower is associated with the sun and all solar deities. Its essence helps balance the first chakra and also helps with confidence in leadership roles. Sunflower oil can be used as carrier oil for healing oils used in massages and ointments.

16. Violets
Another famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks. In Roman mythology, violets were said to be lesser goddesses who once dared to rival the beauty of Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty.  Violets are affiliated with the planet Venus or Pluto and are associated with the nymphs of ancient Greek myths.  Violets are also associated with death and rebirth through the story of Attis. Violets are useful in love spells and may be carried as an amulet to increase one’s luck in love. Try combining them with lavender for an enhanced effect.

 Sources:  HerbalRiot, Cheralyndarcey, Witches of the Craft, Inspirationforthespirit,  Witchipedia 

Instead of using pesticides, plant catnip near ur other plants. Not only is it a good substitute that wards off a lot of unfriendly bugs, it’s also a really good source of food and pollen for the bees. Save ur plants, and the bees, and maybe u can dry it and make it into toys for ur cat, too, if u have one.

Resources for Binding Magic

Updated: June 22nd, 2017

For the purpose of this masterpost, I am defining binding as “any spell that can be utilized to prevent a person from performing any specific action, generally harmful in nature, by rendering them incapable or unable of doing so.”

There are other ways to utilize bindings of course - in the instance of keeping something closer to you - but the spells in this list will be relating to the definition I have listed above.

General Resources

General / Multipurpose

Hinder Harmful Actions

(cw for all the spells in this section: mentions of abuse / abusive benhaviour)

 Stop Other Magic / Magic Users

Halt Gossip / Speech

Prevent Touching

Remove From Your Life / Prevent Contact

(akin to banishing)

Block Unwanted Love

Self Binding

Spirit Binding

Binding-Curses

instagram

This bee is licking sugar from a q-tip as part of a “proboscis extension reflex” assay.  This experiment, at a lab in Penn State University, is used to test the memory and learning ability of bees.  Researchers expose the restrained bee to a smell and then offer it a sugar reward.   Then after a pause, they expose the bee to the same smell and see if it sticks out its tongue (also called proboscis) in anticipation of the reward.  If it does, then you know is has learned to associate the smell with food. 

Researchers have used this test to show that very small amounts of pesticides and even “inactive" agricultural spray additives are harming bees’ ability to remember where their food is.

This bee was photographed for a story on honeybees in the May issue of National Geographic.

- Anand Varma (@anandavarma), National Geographic photographer