no page numbers

shippinggg  asked:

I love that ask where someone asks you what's going on with Hands that do no Harm and you say that you've hired someone to write the fic...but the person you hired was yourself lol it makes me laugh every time what a big mood

The better news is that I’ve fired the fic writer, and instead hired a comic illustrator! 

The bad news is that I still hired myself. 

the OTHER better news is that I’m going to spend time this week moving it from alpha to beta! Start actually breaking it down into chapters and page numbers and all that good shit. I’m hoping for something in the 200-300 page range, or below. Something like 6-10 comic book sizes.

5

-SO I took these pictures for @blesstale initially because she ordered all this stuff for me from our shop as a celebration for our first design together–! THEN I THOUGHT “HEY THESE LOOK P COOL, I’LL SHARE THEM WITH MY BEAUTIFUL TUMBLR FRIENDS!” so enjoy these!!!

@happykittyshop made that AMAZING Dre plush with her two skilled hands and, she’s actually still selling them right now so go check it out too if you’re interested!!!

What Sarah said at her book signing

- Rhys’s last name is Hotpants (then she retracted and said his name might be revealed in future novels).

- She doesn’t think Aelin and Rhys would fight if they met, they have to much in common. If they met Aelin would be like “I’m too distracted by how attractive you are.” If they got into a verbal fight Aelin would win. Her mean streak runs deeper than Rhys’s. Then she’d feel guilty because “he’s too pretty to cry.”

- If Amren and Manon were tapped in an elevator they’d have a stare off until they both got too hungry to continue. Manon would tear off the elevator’s ceiling panels with her claws and Amren would climb the wires. Then they’d go get a cup of blood together.

- Sarah likes to write “not nice” female characters like Amren and Nesta because she doesn’t think she was always the nicest person in high school. She also believes that no one is ever completely sweet and kind all the time, we’re all a mix of good and bad (except her sister-in-law who is apparently the nicest person in the world). 

- She wrote 20 000 words of Tower of Dawn her first day sitting down to write it. 

- Tower of Dawn will be told from the perspectives of Chaol, Nesryn and Yrene.

- If her characters order Starbucks Amren would be super strong expresso, Rhys would get a latte with pretty foam art and Feyre wouldn’t drink coffee but she’d get English breakfast tea.

- If she could bring her characters anywhere in our world she would bring Feyre to the Louvre. She would just watch Feyre look at the art for hours. She would bring Aelin to the Metropolitan Opera House, which is her favorite place in the world.

- Page 666 of ACOWAR was completely coincidental. When she was reading the version with numbered pages for the first time she burst out laughing when she saw what happened on that page.

- She refused to answer who has the longest wingspan but says she might throw it in at the end of the very last novel. Until then we can choose for ourselves who has the longest ‘wingspan’ and the best ‘flying skills’.

- It upsets her that people feel like they need to apologize for reading fantasy or romance novels. She gained most of her knowledge of healthy romantic and sexual relationships from those kinds of books.

- She still has her copy of Pride and Prejudice from ninth grade where she drew hearts and wrote Sarah Darcy in gel pen.

- Throne of Glass wasn’t a huge success right away. If Crown of Midnight hadn’t sold well she only would have gotten three books.

- She went off on a really long but super sweet tangent about how much she loves her husband. She says that despite common fandom belief he is not the inspiration for Rhys (their only similarities are that they have dark hair and are tall) but their relationship did inspire the tone of Feysand’s relationship, especially the importance placed on equality and partnership. Josh was smiling like crazy the entire time to the point where Sarah had to stop because she kept laughing at his “goofy grin.”

- The very first scene of ACOTAR was inspired by the first song of the Princess Mononoke soundtrack while the last scene of ACOWAR was inspired by the last song on the soundtrack. This was a coincidence.

- Her dog sleeps in Sarah’s office while she writes. She goes there after her walk every morning like she’s going to work.

- She gets inspiration for her female characters through music. She gets inspiration for her male characters by trying to figure our how to get their shirts off in a rainstorm.

More Pro-Football!AU
Thanks @dchanberry!!! [Info to commission denise]

How I Got Straight A’s in My First Year of University

I was so proud of myself when I received firsts (that’s A’s for those not attending uni in the UK) on all of my assessments in my first year at university. Here are some tips for y’all to try at any point in university. They may be specific at times to my experience—my degree is in the social sciences and humanities, and I’m studying in the UK—but I did try to make them more generally applicable, and hopefully they should be helpful to someone out there.

Part One: Everyday Study Routine

  1. Before the start of the academic year, try to get in a little bit of preparation. See if there are any syllabi or reading lists posted online. You don’t have to pour over them, of course, but do attempt to do something, and have a basic grasp on what will be covered in your classes.
  2. Go to all your lectures and seminars. Unless you absolutely have to miss class because you are ill or have an important obligation to take care of, it’s really important to attend your lectures every day. (Note: if you are struggling with mental or chronic illness or a disability, don’t beat yourself up if you keep missing class. Please take care of yourself.) You may be tempted to just look at the PowerPoint presentation online, but it’s much more effective to be there in person. Often the lecturer may include information or extra explanations which are not included in the presentation. It will also allow you to process the information aurally as well as visually, and you will have the added benefit of taking notes too. You may also be able to ask questions.
  3. Do all the pre-reading for lectures. I know it’s tempting to put it off, but try to work it into your daily routine (because you will have reading to do every day). Inevitably, there will be times where you slip up and don’t have time to finish. If this happens, make sure you catch up on it at some point, because it’s very important to solidifying the concepts you are learning about. Also, the more you read in general, the better you will become at reading (and also writing).
  4. Take diligent notes (for both your lectures and pre-reading), and keep them organized. I prefer to handwrite in a notebook, as it helps me synthesize information rather than just typing it out verbatim—but it is totally up to you. If you do use a notebook, make a table of contents on the first page, where you write the date, topic, class, and page numbers of each set of notes you take. I think it’s a great idea to include your own thoughts and opinions in notes, or linking concepts you are learning to concepts you already know about.
  5. If you have the time, make sure to be reading books/essays/articles and engaging with ideas outside of your regular syllabus. This is one of the most important techniques (in my experience, at least) when it comes to writing essays and answering exam questions. Evidence of wider reading around a topic is a great way to boost the credibility of your argument. It also does wonders to solidify and broaden your conceptualization of certain ideas you may have covered in your classes.
  6. Where possible, try to contribute (as much as you feel comfortable) in seminars. If you are very quiet and reserved, that is totally okay too. I’m with you. But it has helped me tremendously in the past year to push myself to speak up more often in seminars. Talking in seminars allows you to clarify concepts and engage more deeply with the material being discussed (and it might impress your seminar tutor too, though this is secondary to the learning in my opinion).
  7. If you have some nerdy-ass friends, talk with them about your ideas and what you’re both learning in your courses. I can’t tell you the number of essays I’ve written which actually have blossomed out of conversations I’ve had with friends, where they’ve exposed me to topics I’d never heard of before or broadened my view of a concept. Learning from each other in a casual and fun setting is amazing!

Part Two: Assessment Time

  1. When you are given notice about big assignments coming up, such as essays or group projects, try to start working on them ASAP. Trust me, I know how hard it is. This is coming from someone who has dealt for years with chronic procrastination issues and nearly didn’t graduate from high school because of it. But you must start planning as soon as you possibly can, because the due date will come screaming up and before you know it, it’ll be the night before the deadline and you won’t have a clue what you’re writing about. Work it into your daily schedule if you have to. One great tip is to write down the deadline as being earlier (say, a week earlier) than what it actually is. This will prompt you to start earlier than you normally would have.
  2. Do a shitload of reading, widely, from multiple sources. Read everything you can on the topic you are doing your assignment on. For a basic literature review, this means looking through at least 20+ sources. That doesn’t mean carefully perusing each one front to back; it means looking through all the relevant literature to find a few great sources which will really give you a coherent argument and a big picture of the topic at hand.
  3. Keep your sources organized. I use Paperpile, which is a Chrome extension that allows you to save and organize academic sources. I make a folder for each assessment I am working on, and anything I find relevant to my topic, I save it to the folder. This will be a life saver for you when you actually go to plan your paper and also do the referencing.
  4. Content is important, but perhaps even more important is your argument and structure. This mostly applies to essays, but you can apply it to other types of assessments too. Try not to structure your argument in terms of blocks of content—e.g. Paragraph 1 is about Topic A, Paragraph 2 is about Topic B—but rather in terms of how you are laying out your argument. Make sure each part of your essay flows into the next, so that you are, for example, setting up a kind of dialogue or narrative between the different sources you’re using. Also ensure that any point you are making clearly relates back to your main thesis.
  5. If you’re a perfectionist like me: train yourself to remember that there is no such thing as perfect. Try to imagine what the perfect essay would be like. Can you imagine it? It’s probably pretty difficult, right? That’s because there is no such thing as a perfect assignment. Remind yourself of this, constantly. Tell yourself that you will be okay with just doing your very best. If you think about it logically: handing in something that is perhaps not your best ever, but handing it in on time and doing pretty well, is infinitely better than attempting to have a “perfect” essay but handing it in late and failing the assignment.

I hope this helped some of you! Best of luck and happy studying this year—go knock ‘em out! xo

How to effectively study a text!

1. Before you start reading, make sure you have a good idea as to what the text is about! I always head straight to Shmoop. I read the introduction (”In a Nutshell”), the themes, and the characters! If you really want to you can read through everything but I prefer to just read enough to know what to look for rather than completely spoiling the text for myself!

2. While I read, I occasionally jot down questions I have. Not who, when, or where questions though - just the how, why, and what questions! I have a few questions that I always ask:

- How does the cultural background of the author effect the text? How is it reflected in the text?

- How was/is the text received by audiences locally and internationally?

- What effect did the text have?

- Why does the author choose to include (insert specific event/action/character/symbol)?

Also make sure to jot down important quotes from the text (and their page numbers!!) so you can easily find and use them in any future assessment!

3. Once you’ve finished reading the text, answer all of the questions. Make sure to use formal, concise language and structure and to answer with as much depth and insight as you can.

4. If you’re a fan of my posts you know how much I absolutely ADORE Google Scholar. Just type in the text or the event and a tonne of formal essays, books, and theses will appear! They’re often incredibly long so I usually only read the introductions and conclusions of a few. AND they use lots of references themselves, so reading introduction will often give you up to ten other people to reference!

It will also give you a range of differing perceptions and analyses of the text or event which you can use to expand your initial perceptions and analyses! Or, they may bring completely new concepts to your intention!

5. If there are any new questions you have or ideas you find intriguing answer/explore them now! Again, write formally.

6. By now, if you have an assignment, you should have a pretty clear idea of what you want to say! This is a good time to choose a topic for it and start working! Sum up everything you know about it and slowly narrow it down to something more specific that you find most interesting so that you have a very clear, always on-topic, insightful assignment!

The Signs As How They Procrastinate
  • Libra: scrolls through every social media they have
  • Aries: stares at a wall for an hour and a half
  • Scorpio: cries over one B for two hours
  • Sagittarius: blogs about studying instead of actually studying
  • Leo: sketches strangers in a near-by café
  • Taurus: researches expensive colleges
  • Pisces: takes a nap
  • Gemini: draws lavish bath with bath bombs and rose petals and coconut oil
  • Cancer: bakes treats for their family
  • Virgo: organizes books by color, alphabetically, and then by number of pages
  • Capricorn: re-writes their to-do list over and over until it looks just aesthetic enough for them to maybe complete something on it
  • Aquarius: binge watches 5 seasons of grey's anatomy

Hey everyone! Over the years I’ve had my fair share of English and other writing intensive classes, and combined with my tendency to procrastinate I’ve had to come up with a way to write papers fast. 

step one: finding a topic and research (aka the hardest part)

You can’t write a paper without a good topic, a strong thesis, and solid research. There’s no getting around that, no matter how short you are on time. Depending on the class and the teacher, you may have your topic chosen for you or you may have total freedom. If your situation is the latter, an ideal topic is one the you care about, have some general knowledge of already, and is specific enough to be covered in the number of pages you’re limited to. After you have a topic picked, do some quick searches to see what’s out there. If your school’s library has a database, that’s the perfect place to start. Be sure to chose quality articles that have been peer reviewed when possible, and where it’s not acknowledge that the source may be an biased in your paper. 

Once you’ve started research, you should have a pretty good idea of what your angle is going to be and what points you want to make. Next write a working thesis. This is basically a sentence or two that states what you will spend the next few pages proving. Once you have it, write it on an index card and put it aside for the next step.

step two: outlining 

Take a look at your past papers. How many paragraphs are usually on a page? It’s about two for me, so I keep that in mind when planning my outline. Now for the part that lets me write so fast: index cards. 

Take one index card per paragraph you’ll need to fill your page limit, and write “into” on the back of the one with your thesis, and conclusion on the other. Now think about how to best prove your thesis, and anything else you saw in research that you want to address. 

  • On one side of the card goes the general topic of the paragraph (ie, “significance of symbolism”).
  • On the back goes all of the specific notes and details that will go in that paragraph (ie, “spring as a symbol of a fresh start for x character”)
  • Once you’ve done that for every paragraph lay them out in front of you and experiment with order. How do they flow naturally?

step three: writing

Now that you have your outline, all you have to do is expand on what’s on your cards. Paragraphs should be at least five sentences each, which is super easy to achieve since you already know what you’re going to say! Think of each paragraph as a mini paper: sentence one should be a topic sentence/intro, explaining what you’re going to cover. The middle/body defends and expands on your topic sentence, and the last sentence or two should conclude the paragraph and transition to the next. 

Once you have your body, you can work on your intro and conclusion. A general rule of thumb for intros is to start with a hook (something interesting that draws the reader in) and ends with your thesis. In the middle should be a sentence or so for each paragraph/point, just to give a little map of where you’re going. The conclusion is basically the same, except in reverse. Wrap it up and tell them what you just told them. 

After that, let it sit for a little while (ideally a day, but if you’re short on time just go to dinner) and then come back to edit with fresh eyes. Reading out loud will help you catch typos!

step four: citations and formatting

I like to cite as I go so I don’t have to do it all at once. I typically write my own, but if I’m in a pinch I’ll use a citation generator (like son of citation) that works super fast. Just be sure to cite everything that needs one! Plagiarism is so not cool. Double check MLA/APA/Chicago guidelines and make sure that everything is formatted right, and you’re good to hit submit!

Good luck on those papers, my fellow procrastinators!

The 16 types as things people have told me.

ENTJ : I ate the largest slice of pizza to establish dominance.

INTP : [in a chemistry class] Is electroplating a sport ?

ENTP : if you think I talk too much, just tell me, we can talk about it sometime.

INTJ : I think emotions are mental garbage, *looks at a picture of a cat*, awwwww.

ENFP : I shit rainbows for fun.

INFP : I think you hurt that tree’s feelings.

INFJ : [someone drops a bowl, far away from INFJ] Omg!!!! that was my fault, I’m sooo sorry.

ENFJ : I know you better than you know yourself.

ESFJ : I bought you an iPhone cuz I heard you weren’t feeling well.

ESFP : What do you mean it’s disrespectful ? Its hilarious.

ESTP : [being asked if they’re a drug addict] Shit fam, that depends, is adrenaline a drug ?

ESTJ : Talk is cheap, SHOW ME THE MONEY!!!!

ISTJ : This is a clear violation of…(mentions the rule down to the page number).

ISTP : I don’t need a parachute, safety is for wimps. 

ISFP : My spirit animal is a guava.

ISFJ : I baked you some cookies for the journey (I was just going to get groceries)

19 Jul 2017 || 

This is not going to be a list of brands or recommendations, but a guide on how to decide what to buy, and things to keep in mind when shopping for stationery. I’m a huge stationery enthusiast and also quite good at organisation, so I hope this will be useful for some of you! 

1. Planning

While it’s nice to just browse the stores from time to time, I recommend to think about what you want to buy before you go shopping to prepare for a new semester or school year. You’ll be less likely to waste money on things you don’t need, and you’ll also be less likely to forget important equipment. Keep the following things in mind: 

  • How do you want to organise your notes etc? Do you need folders, notebooks, loose paper? Do you prefer lines, grid, dotted, or blank paper? Which size do you prefer for notebooks?
  • Do you need special supplies, like a set square, specific pens or pencils for art class, a calculator? 
  • Don’t forget the small stuff - paperclips, eraser, sharpener, pen refills, glue, scissors, compasses… 
  • Do you need a new calendar or filofax inserts? Do you want to start a new method of organisation, like a bullet journal? 
  • Do you need flashcards, post-it notes, page flags? 
  • Do you have to replace something that is broken or can’t be used anymore after your last semester/year? 

If necessary, write a list! (You’ll find an example below.)

2. Brands & Aesthetic 

I can’t write a post about stationery and not address this. You shouldn’t spend loads of money on brands or supplies you don’t actually want or need just to fulfil an aesthetic! But we need to distinguish between the “studyblr aesthetic” and people’s personal aesthetic, which is a different thing. Some like their supplies to be very minimalistic, some like it colourful or flowery, some like it if all their supplies come from the same company and who couldn’t imagine switching their fineliner brand ever in their life. In my opinion that’s a good thing - if you like working with and around your supplies, it can make studying more enjoyable! My supplies are all quite plain, but practical - I’ve learnt how thick my paper needs to be and which pens have the best flow for my handwriting. With time, you’ll get there too! I’d recommend to look at the different options in some stores and decide on what you like best. Find a balance between practicability, quality, and aesthetic - that’s easier said than done, but you know best what works for you! 

3. Money

  • Good stationery doesn’t have to be expensive, and high-end pens or whatever don’t help you get better grades!
  • Get refills for your pens instead of whole new pens. 
  • Don’t buy a notebook if you can’t name exactly what you’re going to use it for! Notebook hoarding is a real problem (trust me), and much more expensive than pencil hoarding (if that’s a thing). 
  • Only invest bigger amounts of money in things that will last you a long time and that you will be using almost every day, for example a filofax agenda, a scientific calculator, or a slightly more expensive fountain pen. 
  • Bullet journal does not equal Leuchtturm1917 or Moleskine, even if it seems that way. You can make a bullet journal out of any journal you have!
  • While I think it’s important to support small businesses (if you have any independent stationery stores in your neighbourhood and you can afford it, buy stuff from them!) - if you can’t afford to spend more than absolutely necessary on stationery, then that’s the way it is. Compare prices online and in different stores, and make use of special deals (stores often have those when school starts!). 

4. Essentials & Additions

To conclude this masterpost, here’s a list of things that I’d consider essentials for a semester. Of course this may differ from person to person, and you might not need some of these things (or maybe you need additional things that are not listed here)! 

  • Writing: two pencils (mechanical or classic ones?), medium strength, + refills if you have mechanical ones/sharpener if you have normal ones; eraser, ballpoint pen and/or fountain pen (depending on what you prefer, plus ink refills for fountain pens), fineliners/gel pens and/or crayons in 3 to 5 colours, highlighters in three colours, two permanent markers (black is the safest option)
  • Paper: Notebooks (size? spiral or not? number of pages? colours for each class or one big notebook for all classes), flashcards, post-it notes in two colours, page flags
  • Equipment: calculator (how many functions?), set square, scissors, maybe glue if you’re bullet journalling, paper clips, stapler, puncher, correction fluid, sellotape, pins 
  • Organisation: folders and/or binders (colours?), dividers, labels for the folders if not provided, journal or calendar (inserts for filofax or a whole new calendar?), plastic sleeves (I’d say 10 to 20)

Possible additions that might not be necessary for you: 

  • Printer paper, printer ink, laminating sheets
  • Washi Tape, stickers, other inserts for your bullet journal/calendar
  • Laptop sleeve, additional charger, USB stick, HDMI adapter
  • Textbook sleeves, bookmarks
  • compasses, rubber bands
  • pencils in various strengths, highlighters/crayons/gel pens in various colours
  • additional inserts for your filofax (addresses, year overview, coloured paper)
  • magnets, posters, whiteboard markers
  • coloured paper/flashcards
  • non-permanent markers (e.g. for overhead projections)
  • … (can be added to!)

I hope this was helpful! If you have any more questions, feel free to ask. 

4

300+ Follower Art Raffle

Thank you all so much for following and supporting my art! If you are interested in participating in the raffle, read the rules and guidelines below:

Rules:
- No NSFW. Requests for these will be denied.
- No mecha ((machines)). Requests for these will be denied.
- Must be following (I will check!)
- 1 Reblog = 1 Entry (You can LIKE it if you want! Though it won’t count)

1st Prize:
- Watercolor painting
- Bust (head to shoulder / chest)
- 1 Character ONLY, of your choice

2nd Prize:
- Traditional pen line art
- Can be head shot, bust, half-body, or full
- 1-3 Characters (1 minimum, 3 maximum), of your choice
- OPTIONAL: Include in request what you’d like characters to be doing

3rd Prize:
- Paper child / Bitty
- 1 Character ONLY, of your choice
- Any size ((keep in mind, most are made from 4 x 5.5 piece of 8 x 11 paper))
- OPTIONAL: Include in request how you want to interact

Winners will be chosen randomly and announced in three weeks, August 11th. Please contact me either through adding a reply to the announcement OR through personal / direct messaging on Tumblr about what you would like within a 5 day period. If I do not hear from you within this time, another person will be chosen in your place!

Again, thank you SO MUCH, and GOOD LUCK!

Ask Scorpius

What?

What the Hell are you on about?

Is that?–

What Possessed you to go looking for Albus Potter’s Journal?!

“Certainly not the gnawing need to know who the hell this kid really is instead of letting him expect you to just make assumptions about his family name. Not that.”

Doesn’t it say Journal on the front?

Whatever, so if you’re stuck to it then- I don’t want to be around when he finds you out.

What’s in it for me if I stay?

TOP SECRET FORMATTING PRO-TIP FOR WRITERS

So I really don’t care much for formatting questions - the normal default way you learned to make documents in school is perfectly fine - make sure you use a legible typeface and 12-point font and normal margins and put your name on it and number the pages - but I really don’t care how big you make the title, or whatever.

THAT SAID - there is a something that almost NONE of you do… that ALL of you should do when submitting mss.

From Laura Bradford:

Yep - it is ridiculously annoying to tell one of your mss from the other when reading on an e-reader. So like, here’s all you have to do:

GO INTO PROPERTIES

CLICK AND SEE – probably there is nonsense there that you didn’t ever add, like the name of your school or workplace, the nickname of your computer, etc. Whoops!

FIX IT – make the title and author match the title and author on your actual doc, and get rid of any other weirdness.

PRESTO! Now you should stand out on our reader! Yay!

(BTW when I say hardly anyone does this - I absolutely include my own authors. I add title, author, category, and my name to every ms I send out, it’s usually gibberish when it comes to me.)

hey guys! talking from personal experience, this time of year can be super scary for anybody looking to move into the job world. whether you’re graduating soon and need to look for full time work, looking for summer internships or placements, or just looking to get a part time job to make some money over the summer, a solid cv is crucial. so i’m gonna share some of my tips below, i work in advertising, i’ve worked most of my career in sales, and even though i’m still fresh to the working world i hope i can give you guys some employment tips! 

basic bits

  • ok, so you need to put your contact details at the top of the page, name, phone number, email address, post code and sometimes nationality are all important to get out of the way first 
  • if you have your degree grade, or expected grade, put education at the top. list your grade and the dates you studied at uni, and the grades, dates and subjects that you studied to a high level when you left school. this is less important for part time jobs so i would probably put it below the next section in those circumstances
  • past experience is next. list everywhere you’ve ever worked, whether it was a proper paid job, helping out at local events, tutoring, anything that can give insight into your skills and your character. put a couple bullet points for each job, explaining the tasks you did and what you learnt from them. the most important thing is to emphasise what skills you have and how you’ve proven them in the past. 
  • i put other experience next, generally just volunteering, if you held a responsibility role in your school you can put that here too
  • skills & interests should be another section, talking about your non work related skills (but still relating these back to working). so for me, i talk about my creative hobbies like writing and music, which are important when applying for creative industries like advertising. i also talk about teaching myself arabic and adobe creative suite because languages are useful, design skills are useful, and most crucially taking initiative and embracing opportunities to learn are essential in any job that wants to see you grow

sales tips 

  • other people applying for the same jobs as you will not be handing in a 100% truthful cv. you don’t have to lie, and you shouldn’t ever ever lie on your cv because it’s not worth getting caught out. however, you’d be smart to jazz it up a bit. 
  • every task you’ve undertaken in your life has taught you something, no matter how small. think about every job related thing you’ve ever done and think of a way to make it sound special. 
  • for instance, i manually alphabetically organised a directors business cards during an internship. it was beyond boring. yet, now i talk about being a crucial support for the team, how i took initiative in collating their contacts into a brand new filing system to increase productivity speed. any dumb task can be chatted up. 
  • sales is all about confidence, confidence, confidence. you have to believe you are a great candidate, it’ll come across in your writing 
  • keep it to one page, max 2 if you’ve had a lot of previous roles. nobody wants to read that much. if it’s looking a bit long try reformatting to keep it all looking neat and succinct. 
  • send it as a pdf, not as a word document. keeps it looking professional. 

cover letters

  • now, cover letters can be a real pain. i would suggest writing different ones for each application, even though making a generic one and editing it is easier. it’s worth it to show that you give a shit. 
  • actually, all that really matters is giving a shit. talk about how great you are, and about how much you have to offer that they need in their company. you can phrase it in a non arrogant fashion, but at the end of the day a job application isn’t the place for humility. 
  • talk about the company, talk about why you like it and why you want to be there. if you’re applying to a small company definitely chat about how great you think the business is, because chances are the people who run the company will actually see it. people who have their own company LOVE to hear people talk about loving their company and their idea. 

all that really matters

  • be genuine, be passionate, be enthusiastic about the role, about the company and about yourself.
  • stay calm and focused on your goals, and believe in yourself and your abilities. don’t be afraid of being great, and don’t be afraid of letting people know it. 

i really hope these could be of use to anybody, if there’s any tips you guys need for job huting let me know, i’ve done a lot of it!

Descriptions of Lorcan

All of the descriptions I could find if Lorcan in Heir of Fire, Queen of Shadows, and Empire of Storms with page numbers:

Heir of Fire

“A towering man”
-pg 441
“The powerfully built male”
-pg 442
“The dark-haired Demi-fae didn’t say anything as Rowan rushed to the battlement gates”
-pg 444
“And lorcan, face stone-cold”
-pg 506
“There was nothing merciful on his rugged face”
-pg 507

Queen of Shadows

“From the corner of her eye, she could make out the cruel features beneath his dark hood, along with onyx eyes and matching shoulder-length hair”
-pg 303
“Massive”
-pg 304
“No doubt so that Rowan could see every bit of triumph in Lorcan’s dark eyes”
-pg 429
“Lorcan peered at Aelin, his black hair shifting with the movement”
-pg 432
“Lorcan’s eyes were chips of black ice”
-pg 516

Empire of Storms

“His black eyes devoured her, his face harsh beneath equally dark, shoulder-length hair”
-pg 96
“His dark eyes unmoved”
-pg 176
“Lorcan’s dark hair seemed to swallow the light, his onyx eyes flat and dull”
-pg 374
“Lorcan’s dark eyes were unreadable in the dimness”
-pg 377
“Lorcan looked over a broad shoulder. There was nothing human in his dark eyes”
-pg 411
“Dark, depthless eyes slid to her”
“His stubble-rough cheek”
-pg 478
“Those eyes, darker than the gaps between the stars, slid to her”
-pg 490
“Lorcan’s onyx eyes were unreadable as he scanned her face”
-pg 537
“Any softness vanished from lorcan’s granite-hewn features”
-pg 547

Descriptions of the cadre part 2/5


Welp, you guys asked for more. The rest of the cadre will follow soon

23 June 2017 || 

Hi!

Over the last few semesters, I developed my own system of revising for exams. I’m a visual learner and writing things down in an organised way helps me loads. I posted pictures of my exam notes several times before (here, here, here, here) and I use this format for basically every class that requires an exam instead of an essay - so far: calculus 1, real analysis, maths education, english literature, and teaching german as a second language. Many people really liked this format, so here’s a step-by-step guide on how I do it! 

1. Supplies

I use:

  • blank A4 paper
  • one sheet of A4 grid paper 
  • a black gel pen by Kyocera (you can use any pen, but it should have a somewhat fine tip and should dry easily)
  • Stabilo fine liners point88 (one or two matching colours per class)
  •  a set square (imo that works better than a ruler)
  • a Faber-Castell 0.7 Grip 1347 pencil in 2B (you can use any pencil you like, but it should be HB or 2B because you need to erase it later)
  • lecture notes/slides, class notes, homework, basically any info that is necessary for the exam

2. Setup

  1. Place the grid paper underneath the blank one. Make sure it doesn’t move when you write (if necessary, use paperclips to hold it in place). 
  2. Draw margins and aid lines (in pencil - you’ll erase these later). Measure them out so they’ll be the same on every sheet. I usually do approximately 1cm margins left, right, and bottom, 2.5cm margin at the top for title and subheading, and three columns: left one with a width of 6cm, middle one with 5cm, right one with 6cm and 0.5cm blank space between them. (The grid paper underneath will help.) You can also only make two columns - four columns is gonna be very hard though because that won’t leave you with much space. 
  3. Every time you have a list, bullet points, step-by-step guides etc, indent the bullets by another 0.5cm (draw another aid line for this). If you have sub-bullets, indent them another 0.5cm and so on. 
  4. I use colours for bullet points (the actual points /arrows /numbers/ whatever), important names, something that I’m defining, subheadings, and important dates. 

3. Content

  1. Start writing your notes. Make them as condensed as you possibly can without leaving important points out. I try to go for one A4 page per lecture (aka around 28 powerpoint slides or more on one page), but sometimes I’ll also end up with two.
  2. Use abbreviations for words you use a lot, e.g. “+” for “and”, “p.” for “problem”, “str.” for “strategies”, “lit.” for “literature” etc. 
  3. You can absolutely include important diagrams/graphs etc. Either print them out in the size you need or draw them by hand and in the colours you need. If it doesn’t fit in one column, spread it out over two columns and continue the separated columns underneath/above. 
  4. Make your bullet points mean something. Use numbers, arrows, flags, lowercase letters, uppercase letters, dots - each can have a different meaning. Are you writing something where the order is important       (numbers)? Are you giving examples (dots)? Are you mentioning separate important key points (flags)? 
  5. I wrote my last summary page for maths education today and stopped the time - I needed 50 minutes for one lecture with 27 slides (new material because I hadn’t been there), including a small chocolate break. 

4. Final Touches

  • Check if the ink has dried. Check again. 
  • Carefully erase the pencil aid lines with a good eraser. make sure you don’t wrinkle the paper (unless you don’t care about that sort of stuff haha)
  • If you want to, you can highlight key words (or whatever you like). 
  • Number your pages if you’ll write several. I always write down the number of the lecture (session 1, session 2 etc) in the subheading. 
  • Optional, but I do it: Make a copy of your sheet that you carry around with you. Nothing is as frustrating as spilling coffee over your revision sheets. Put the original in a plastic sleeve and keep it in a folder or binder somewhere, and study/revise only with the copy. Especially useful if you have others quizzing you with your summaries and they don’t care if they rip/wrinkle/ruin them lmao 

I hope this was somewhat informative! You can tweak it of course, depending on what class you have and what will be on the exam. I hope you’re having a nice weekend! :)