no one needs to study this hard

So much of the “discourse” surrounding history on this website is basically something akin to “This person/these people were bad/did bad things so don’t talk about them ever at all and if you do talk about them, you must agree with their actions and you’re trash.”

That’s so…..bad? And I’m not expecting this website to be an emissary of historical study but if we’re gonna use social media to have discussions, we need to address that. You don’t do anyone any favours by choosing to pull a veil over unsavoury aspects of the past. Shitty people existed. Hard times happened. There’s no use wrapping it up in cottonwool or twisting it or telling a half-truth. It is what it is. Nuanced discussions are required to learn from it and improve our present and our future which I believe is one of the reasons we should study history in the first place. To take a moral tale.

Stop this “work hard” bullshit. You deserve free time, you deserve sleep and you deserve mental health. You deserve to procrastinate and you deserve to have your hobbies. You deserve it. You need it. No one should work & study all the time.

In honor of my 5th semester in a row of all A’s (hell yeah boiiiii) I’m going to make this post. I don’t know how I did it because I am honestly so lazy.

  1. Grades are reflective of your work ethic and your ability to strategize, not your intelligence.
  2. Be real with yourself. Are you sure you are ready to commit to perfect grades? Are you ready to work, day in and day out, when it sucks and classes are boring and hard? Are you ready to feel satisfied for all of the hard work you put in? If the answer is yes, congratulations. You are on your way to becoming a straight-A student.
  3. Prioritize classes. Not every class requires the same amount of work, and you should find out the hardest classes early on in the semester. These will take the most time, and you will have to spend extra time and effort to get a good grade. When choosing classes, make sure you will be able to handle them. Make sure you will be able to ace all of them, at the same time. That being said, don’t shy away from hard classes. You have to challenge yourself. Take a few AP’s. They are worth it.
  4. Make friends with teachers/professors, especially the ones that teach hard subjects. I am very close with my chemistry professor, and this has proved invaluable because I am able to get free tutoring, as well as a great recommendation letter for college apps.
  5. Have other goals. You need to do something that is not studying to keep you productive. I would highly recommend joining a sports team or club. I exercise (usually running and weightlifting) at least 2 hours a day, usually more. Playing 2 sports made me more healthy, social, and productive. Running calms me down, and weightlifting makes me feel strong. Do whatever makes you feel good, as long as it’s healthy.
  6. Learn to manage time well. How do I play 2 sports, get straight A’s, have a studyblr, and have time to spare? The answer is that I take care of myself well. I go to bed at 10:30 or 11 each night so I can get 7 ish hours of sleep. I do homework during lunch or in class so I don’t do it at home.
  7. Slack off. Yep. I said it. I complete assignments strategically, spending the most time on things worth the most points. Things that will only take a few minutes can occasionally be done in class right before the teacher is collecting homework. I have done this all too often. That being said, small assignments really do add up so make sure you do an acceptable job and turn them in on time.
  8. Turn something in. It is ok to sometimes slack off in quality, but if something is due, you better turn something in. Something is better than nothing. Getting extensions on assignments for no reason will make the teacher think you are lazy, or don’t care about their class. Every single essay and worksheet does not have to be your best work, but make sure you fill the basic assignment requirements, and it should be enough. 
  9. Extra. Credit. Some classes don’t offer this, but if they do, just freaking do it man. Knowing you can miss an assignment because you did extra credit earlier is the best feeling, especially when doing that assignment would have meant losing sleep. 
  10. Plan (sort of). I have a bullet journal where I write important assignments down. As I said, there are some assignments not worth your time that you can half-ass. The ones I write down are the ones I need to do well. If you write down every. last. assignment. you will burn out and stop planning altogether. 
  11. Sometimes, go above and beyond. You know that subject you really like? With an awesome teacher? Spend time on it. Make your project extra beautiful, and read ahead in the textbook. Watch video lectures online, and maybe even make a studyblr post about it. Your extra work might not be turned in for credit, but it will make you feel a whole lot more knowledgeable on the subject. Do this for classes you hate, too. Maybe it’s not as bad as you think it is. The extra effort might allow you to see the beauty in a subject you used to despise. 
  12. Be real with yourself (again). This past semester, I had a B+ for a few months in a subject I really love. I wasn’t mad, and I didn’t stress about it, because, honestly? It doesn’t really matter. Eventually I brought the grade up again, but it would be fine to me either way. 
40 Study Tips & Tricks

I thought to write down the “script” to one of my most viewed videos, with 40 study tips & tricks. It’s easier to read them and pass on the word!

Organization Tips:

1. Incorporate homework and classes in you daily planner – that will give you an overall glimpse of how your week will be about and how much time you need to spend in your studying sessions!

2. Color coordinate classes – be it notes, your planner, your textbooks or binders, pick a unique color for each class and work around the hues of that color to get more organized!

3. Make your own syllabus – if your professor doesn’t provide a syllabus for your class, try to make one before the school year working around your given textbooks or other given material.

4. Make study guides – make a study guide from your syllabus and draw before each topic two boxes: one for a midtest and one for the final test. When you have one of these tests, check the boxes when you’ve finished studying the chapter so you won’t miss anything!

5. Reference your material throughout – most of the times, we students work with in-class notes, textbooks and a syllabus. Since we get small bits of information here and there it’s important to reference every page throughout all your material so you can quickly access your information without having to flip endlessly through pages!

6. Keep a dashboard nearby – Whenever you use a notebook or a binder, make a dashboard on the first page with post it notes so you can quickly scribble any questions, homework or page numbers. When you get home, you just need to open your dashboard and attend those notes.

7. Print any tests, exercises and exams you can find – keep those in the end of your binder. These are perfect to practice before exams and tests because they really reflect what you will be tested about. Set an alarm clock for the deadline and start working on those!

8. Condense – organization disappears when you have too many of everything. Working with more than one planner in your life will make everything chaotic. If you think you need a second planner because you don’t have enough space to write in the first one, it’s because you don’t have available time as well. Don’t fool yourself and set achievable goals!

9. Customize your textbooks – most of the times, textbooks are formal books where information is hard to come by. Make your own tabs and write every chapter on them so they stick out – flag any charts, tables or graphics. Everything needs to be incredibly accessible!

10 Print a special planning sheet before finals: Organizing your studying by chapters and/or topics before finals is tremendously important since it lets you organize the amount of time you dedicate to each subject,

Study Sessions and Time Management

11. Save at least one afternoon or one morning a week for intensive studying. These is your “life-saver” – when you get so full of homework and projects that you can’t incorporate them into your daily academic routine, one free afternoon to organize your school life will really come in handy! Make an appointment with yourself!

12. Prepare in advance – although most professors may not ask you to prepare a class in advance, if you have the means to, go ahead. Grab a sheet and make a summary of the chapter your class will be about. Write the major topics and key information and take that guide to class. When your professor repeats previously studied information, you will be able to understand everything much better!

13. Never leave something behind – Even if you have a more light class, where professors don’t request homework or any side projects, don’t let that fool you! Be disciplined and be your own professors! Make your own projects and learn everything you can so you can nail those finals when they arrive.

14. Write your questions – most of the time, in a heavy study session, we come up with tons of questions and sometimes we just leave them behind. Write them down in your dashboard or a small notebook and ask your professors (personally or via e-mail). You can also ask your schoolmates in a facebook group created for that purpose!

15. Set an alarm clock and reward yourself – even if you study during an entire afternoon your studying will be pointless if you don’t take regular breaks. Set an alarm clock for one hour/one hour and a half and then take a 15 minute break. Never study for more than 2 hours straight! Even if you don’t notice, you’ll get less and less focused.

16. . Make a list – before each study session I like to grab my notepad and write down everything that I need to do before my session ends: the chapters I need to read, the pages I need to go through and the homework I need to complete. Sometimes I even write theses lists when I’m in college so I’ll have more determination to complete those tasks once I get home.

17 Work on the least interesting thing first. There are always classes or projects that we like the least – and those are the ones that we need to tackle first. You will start your studying session concentrated, which will let you go through the worst tasks faster.

18 Print, print, print. try to print everything you can and never study from your computer. Having your PDF files printed at hand will let you concentrate better, highlight and write some notes in the margins. You can take these everywhere with you and even turn them into small guides for future classes!

19. If you finish ahead, don’t quit. Perhaps the time you’ve saved for your study session has come to an end way before you have planned. That doesn’t mean you should stop right now – Take that time to review what you’ve learned so far or prepare other classes ahead of time!

20. Study in an organized space – make your own studying corner – bring everything you will need, from textbooks, binders and notebooks, to a cup of coffee and your computer. Keep them neatily organized on your desk so everything is at hand and on sight. Put on some soft background music (links down below) and adjust the lightning.

In class notes

21. If your professor provides PowerPoint slides before each class, print them (six or four per page) and bring them to class. Write in the margins and more throughout information in the back so it’s all condensed and tight. This is where you’ll take your notes. If you prefer to write on lined paper, think about copying some ruled paper to the back of your printed slides.

22. If your professor asks you to prepare your class in advance, try to make a small guide for each class. Open the comments column in MSWord and print the pages with that column. When you go to class, incorporate the in-class notes in that column, next to the relevant information so everything is nice and condensed.

23 If you are in a information-heavy class, try to adopt the Cornell method, which is the best, in my opinion, when you need to be a fast writer. There’s a video right here on how to use this method.

24. If you are in a bits-and-pieces class, which is that kind of class where the professor just gives a few key points and then gives practical examples or makes you work in group, try to adopt the box method – you can draw these boxes yourself or make them with post it notes – these are way more visual and perfect to memorize information.

25. Write in-class flashcards – if you don’t have flashcards around, make tiny flashcards on the top of your notes, where you cover the definitions you’ve written with the name of the definition. Each time you open your notes, try to remember the hidden definition. Automatic studying, every time!

26. Participate in class – nothing better than to be actively involved in your class discussion. For most of us, shy creatures, participating can be dreadful – but once you get out of your box, you’ll see how participating really makes you understand the subject!

27. If you have any questions during class, raise your hand and ask them. If your professor doesn’t like being interrupted, write them down and approach them in the end of the class. Sometimes, the little things we don’t understand are exactly the ones that come up on the final exam!

28. Ask for examples. Examples are probably the thing that makes your brain connect the information faster. If your professor isn’t keen on providing examples, suggest your own and see if your answer comes up right. Sometimes, examples are the thing that really makes us understand our material and our definitions, since they transform formal information into relatable events.

29. Sit at the front. It sounds too straightforward but sitting at the front really makes wonders. You won’t get distracted by what you classmates are doing, you will focus on the professor, who is right in front of you and you will resist the temptation of going to Facebook and Instagram during a boring presentation.

30. Write a brief summary at the end of the class. During those five minutes where everyone is dismissed and leaving the room, write a brief summary of that classes’ key points in the back of a page – this is fundamental in the Cornell method but can be used in any other method as well.

Finals Guide

31 Skim through your material two times: at first, you should start by studying your material starting from the end. The last lessons will be fresh in your memory and it’s very important to reinforce your knowledge on these while you can. In the second reading, you should start from the beginning, as usual. It’s important to make these two readings so you can go through the information in a much more flexible way.

 32. Make a mindmap of each chapter. A mindmap is a chart that relates key words and important information, making it easy to understand the relationship and hierarchy between such key words. Use colors and images to memorize your material better. Oh, and don’t forget to check out my video on how to make mindmaps!

33. Read each of the titles and try to say out loud its contents, explaining each concept and the relationship between them. Imagine you are the teacher and are lecturing that subject to a crowd. If you skip any of the subjects, do it all over again. The more you repeat, the better you will memorize.

34. It’s time for some flash cards!  Write the topic or the title on one side and the meaning or the explanation on the other. Try to cover as many topics or titles as you can and go through your cards while memorizing as best as you can each of the concepts. Try to do it backwards if you have time to do so!

35. On the day before the exam, skim through your mindmaps and flash cards again and always try to study while talking. Saying your content out loud will force your brain to relate information in a much more cohesive way and you’ll memorize everything much better.

36. Read the entire exam from top to bottom. Underline or circle any important words that you think will be crucial in you answer. After that, calculate how much time you should spend answering each question: this simple calculation will take only twenty seconds and will help you organize your time. Try to save five minutes at the end for revisions.

37. If you are solving a written exam and not multiple choice, try as much as possible to organize each answer in a structured way, saving two lines just to present your line of thought and writing each different argument in a different paragraph. Draft a conclusion at the end to underline the centre of your answer. Sometimes softly underlining some keywords is important to make your professor notice that you’ve correctly given importance to certain concepts.

38. Use these symbols for each question: one dot if you aren’t sure of the answer, two dots if you are sure of your answer and a circle if you are completely unaware of your answer. Start by answering any question with two dots; after those are all answered, go on through the two dots question. Leave the circle questions to the end – and ALWAYS answer them! Even if you don’t know what they’re about, who knows if you will be able to come up with something right?

39. Review your test one final time – many times, we make a lot of mistakes under stress and now is when you should spot them and amend them. This can be the difference between a B and an A!

40. Don’t take this too seriously – school is an important aspect of our lives but it isn’t everything. Failure comes many times and these failures can even drive you away from something that was simply not meant to be. Don’t stress out because everyone goes through the same!

  • me watching TV or listening to music to study a foreign language: I can't continue with this. I need rigor. I need structure. I need a page with words and directions so I can expand my understanding. I need hard work and pencils and pens. This is how I truly learn.
  • me taking notes from a book and writing down vocabulary lists to study a foreign language: I need experience. I need freedom. I need fun. I need to enjoy this language how its speakers do. A book can't teach me everything. I need to watch media in this language and really expose myself to it. This is how I truly learn.
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the iconic mildliners™!! as much as im obsessed with them, i gotta have some real talk here. yes almost all studygrams/studyblrs have them, they look so aesthetically pleasing, and they might seem like they can change your life forever but tbh you don’t have to spend $11 on 5 of them, you can get 10 for $4 in Daiso for the same exact colours (yes, i bought the Daiso ones just to compare and i can guarantee you the cool and the fluorescent sets are identical.) AND YOU DONT NEED THEM TO START A STUDY ACCOUNT!!! it was super hard to search for especially in where im from, but if you dont live in the US, get it from eBay and i promise you i searched for days for the cheapest place and eBay is where you can get all 4 sets for $30! this wasn’t sponsored, but i just thought id help everyone who desires to buy them to get a cheap deal. anyways i hope all of you have a good and productive day or night! 

(ू•ᴗ•ू❁)
6 Things People Don't Always Tell You About Studying

1. you ace tests by overlearning. you should know your notes/flashcards/definitions basically by heart. if someone asks you about a topic when you’re away from class or your notes and you can answer them in a thorough and and accurate answer, then you’re good, you know the material. 

2. if you don’t understand something, it will end up on the test. so just don’t disregard and hope that this specific topic won’t be on the test. give it more attention, help, and practice. find a packet of problems on that one concept and don’t stop until you finish it and know it the best. 

3. sometimes you just need that Parental Push. you know in elementary school, they would tell you “ok now it’s time for you to do your homework! you have a project coming up, start looking for a topic now!” ONE of your teachers might be like this. be thankful for it and follow their advice! these teachers are the best at always keeping you on track with their calendar. if not a teacher, then have one of your friends be that person that can keep you accountable for the things you promised you would do. 

4. you just need to kick your own ass. seriously. i know it sucks and its hard to study for two things at once. BUT. I DONT CARE IF IT’S HARD. you need to do it and at least do it to get it over with because you can’t keep putting things off. If you do, you will eventually run out of time and you will hate yourself. force yourself to do it. i made myself sign up for june ACT even though there’s finals because if i didn’t, i probably never would. like do i think i’m gonna be ready in one month? probably not, SO I BETTER GET ON IT AND START STUDYING! 

5. do homework even if it doesn’t count. if you actually try on it, then you will actually do so much better on the tests, it’s like magic. 

6. literally just get so angry about procrastinating that you make yourself start that assignment. I know how hard it is to kick the procrastination habit. I have to procrastinate. So I make myself start by thinking about my deadlines way early. I think, “oh i have a presentation in three weeks (but it really takes 2 weeks to do), i’ll be good and start today.” when that doesn’t happen, you say you’ll do it tomorrow, and this happens for like the next four days. I get so mad at myself for not starting when i am given a new chance to do so with every passing day. By that time, you actually have exactly how much time you need for it AND you were able to procrastinate the same way you usually do ;)

Signs as Overwatch Characters Based Off What I Know of Them
  • Aries: Torbjörn, intimidating but with a squishy side, stubborn as hell and not afraid to throw someone into the ring of fire when angered
  • Taurus: McCree or Roadhog, either way they end up on the Chaotic side of the alignment and tend to be either really good at smooth talking or always on Edge™
  • Gemini: Tracer, energy everywhere, the one who thinks that ice cream is okay for dinner, no one knows how much they actually sleep or if they do, mentally exhausted but always has their signature smile
  • Cancer: Reaper, so edgy and emotional, always trying too hard, it's okay if you don't win ever Uno game, probably needs a hug
  • Leo: Lúcio, it doesn't matter if you've got this or not cause you're going to have fun, probably has a playlist for each mood and or at least a good study/work playlist, that friend that pays for your meals with any IOUs taken
  • Virgo: Hanzo or Zarya, get some sleep, could scam you with their knowledge but chooses not to, cherish their smiles, collects small knick-knacks everywhere they go
  • Libra: Mei or Symmetra, they like going to the pool over the ocean or lake, drinks tea over coffee, will Roast You™ regardless of standing friendships
  • Scorpio: Widowmaker, tries to act detached but always has that one person in the group who reels them in, probably good at making hot chocolate, likes fluffy socks, embarrassed by subtle romantic things
  • Sagittarius: D.Va or Soldier: 76, will fight you anywhere anytime, meet them in the ball pit, highly skilled at one thing and the rest doesn't matter to them, dad jokes
  • Capricorn: Genji, arrogant arse who thinks they're above everyone, sometimes gives sound advice, is the kid who sat on windowsills and staring out the window in an attempt to be Cool™, closeted weeb
  • Aquarius: Sombra, will fight for you but ultimately there for their own objectives, they're happiest when they're free, craves sweets everyday, high impulse control
  • Pisces: Mercy, tries to be nice but it usually backfires, Absolutely Done with everyone, gives second chances but not thirds, the one who smiles as they kill you
10 Angry College Tips For Incoming Freshmen

(I finished my freshman year this spring with a 4.0 GPA, an off-campus research internship, and three professors contacting me suggesting that I apply for a fulbright scholarship.  These tips aren’t coming out of my ass.) 

1. LISTEN TO ME WHEN I SAY THIS: YOU DO NOT NEED TO “GET INVOLVED” IN STUPID CLUBS IF YOU DON’T ENJOY THEM.  Hear “get involved! :)” for the 1000th time and just barf in your mouth a little and move on.  If you work hard and get good grades, and socialize with people on campus when you have free time (it comes more naturally than you think) YOU WILL.  BE.  FINE.  Actually better than fine.  You’ll have time to get a real job/internship, which by the way, is what the real world wants to see you prioritizing.  Moral of the story: Only join clubs if they help your personality thrive and feel healthy.  Don’t do them because you feel pressured.  

2. DON’T TAKE SHIT FROM A N Y O N E. I know you’re trying to fit in and take the stance of trying to make everyone happy to make sure you’ll have plenty of friends.  But you have to realize that you literally just met these people, and they just met you.  If they create an uncomfortable environment for you that makes college harder to cope with, get them the fuck out of your life. Ain’t nobody got time for people’s high school-ass drama.  

3. SKIP YOUR CLASSES SOMETIMES.  If you really have your shit together, it won’t matter.  Your school will say the amount of skips you can get away with before it harms your grade.  Use. Them.

4. BECOME THE MASTER OF WRITING ESSAYS IN ONE NIGHT.  You will have to.  I’m telling you right the fuck now.  And you can get an A, if you work your lil ass off. I’ve done it many times.  

5. DON’T CARE FOR EVEN 1 SECOND WHAT OTHER PEOPLE THINK OF YOU.  If you wanna wear sweats and no makeup, do it.  If you want to dress up and take time to put on makeup, do it.  If you want to stay away from partying, do it.  If you want to party, have a good ass time.  If anyone has enough time to judge you, they need to be studying harder or getting a hobby.  Make yourself comfortable and happy as fuck and enjoy your time in college worry-free. 

6. BE THE ASSHOLE WITH A TABLET OR LAPTOP IN LECTURE.  You won’t have time to copy it all down.  You’ll be miserable.  Just trust me.  I know studies say its more effective to write stuff down for memory, but, write them out later or something.  Learned that one the hard way.

7. DON’T REWRITE YOUR NOTES IF IT DOESN’T HELP YOU STUDY.  If you know doing that doesn’t help you memorize, don’t do it, period.  Or, if you have a collossal asston of notes (like I did) it isn’t even worth rewriting them all in the first place. I’ve fallen down that hole and lost motivation and time.  Just reread them or make flashcards or whatever.  Study for effectiveness, not aesthetic.

8. BE PREPARED FOR LAB TO GO THE “WHOLE TIME.”  Yah, you’re gonna see 3 hours on that brand-shiny-new schedule of yours and be like there’s no way it’ll go that long, right? LOL about that.  Just mentally brace yourself.  Eat and drink beforehand for the love of god we don’t need hangry people handling chemicals.  

9. COMMUTING DOESN’T MAKE YOU A LONER.  Just.  No. If you live close to campus, are comfortable with commuting, and know you’ll save yourself MAJOR debt by doing it, do it and don’t feel a fucking ounce of guilt about it.  It’ll be some early mornings, but your fresh out of college broke ass will thank you, and you’ll use your time more effectively.  (Plus you get a non grimy shower like??)

10. LOVE YOUR NEW FINE ASS SELF.  College is a fresh start.  Put energy into who you have always wanted to be.  And don’t compromise that out of social anxiety and embarrassment.  You’ll be happy and thank yourself if you step out of your comfort zone to be the person you’ve always had in mind.  

Diane Guerrero photographed by Braden Summers

Any chance you’re considering a future in politics?
It does interest me. I actually studied political science and communications in college. It was really hard which is probably why I want to sing and dance. This is a lot more fun, but I feel like things are coming full circle. Once you do a little growing up and look at the news and say “wow, I’m not OK with a lot of stuff that’s happening,” it’s hard not to look the other way. I’ve shifted my negatives into positives but that needs to happen for everyone—I can’t be the only one who feels this way so I want to do everything I can to help.

having self-discipline while studying can be immensely helpful, and it’ll help you get over procrastination and motivation slumps. here are some tips for developing more self-discipline!
ahhh this post was kinda hard to write because i’m still trying to build up my own self-discipline! hopefully, some of this will help you guys out!

remove all temptations

yes, it’s so so tempting to check tumblr and youtube and twitter and instagram and whatnot while studying. a simple way to fix that is to log off all of your social media accounts, put your phone away and out of your sight while studying, and setting up a website blocker if you need to. chrome has quite a lot of extensions regarding website blockers, so try searching for one that you like.

be ready to study

get all of your materials out, fill up a bottle of water, make yourself a study snack if you want to, make sure your work space is clean and ready to go, etc. it can be disruptive to your own work flow if you suddenly find that you desperately need something halfway across your house during your study session.

don’t wait for “the perfect moment”

waiting for “the right time” and “the perfect moment” can be incredibly detrimental to your own discipline. it’s nice to spend a lot of time digging through a motivation tag and you feel very light and happy to start working. however, that’s not helpful if you’ve spent too much time in that and not enough time to get your own work done. get a start on your own work and try to finish it efficiently so you can get back to whatever you were doing before :-)

don’t make excuses

this is kinda like the one before it, but stop making excuses to yourself unless they’re genuine. i know that other things in your life may come first, and that’s completely fine! just remember to be honest with yourself and stop making up flimsy excuses to push off something that you don’t want to do.

schedule things.

good time management = good self-discipline :)
keep track of all the tasks that you need to do that day, and try to finish all of them in the same day as well. don’t overload your schedule though; be realistic in your planning. you don’t have to cover 15 chapters in one day!!

start whatever you need to do at that time

by pushing it off, you’re inviting yourself into the dreaded loop of procrastination.
if you’ve already fallen into procrastination, force yourself to start the task for at least 10 minutes. after 10 minutes, check to see if you’ve gotten into a nice and steady work flow or if you’re still just worn-out and tired and don’t want to do it at all. if it’s the first one, smile and continue on! you’ve succeeded! if it’s the second one, maybe it’s because you’re too tired and worn out. take a 5 minute break and then try again.

finish what you start

it’s fairly simple: try to finish whatever you start that day. don’t push it off or wait til the next day to finish it.

make up your own deadline

by establishing your own deadline, you set yourself a time frame to finish something in. this pushes you to actually do the work in that amount of time.
also, it’s really helpful especially when working on projects. you can split up the task into separate chunks and make deadlines for each “chunk.” it makes it a lot easier to handle too!

take advantage of mornings

i absolutely detest mornings, but waking up early can be a huge advantage. by waking up early, you’re strengthening your own self-discipline as well as gaining a large amount of time to study and work! besides, it feels great to have a whole night to yourself if you finish all of your tasks in the morning!!

remember to forgive yourself and remember to take breaks!

not everyone can be hyper productive forever. people have their ups and downs, and you’re no exception. don’t beat yourself up over not finishing x amount of tasks that day or for having too many long breaks or whatever. it’s good to shake yourself back into shape, but please please don’t go overboard and despair about your failures. it’s so easy to guilt yourself and spiral away from your built-up discipline ;; the longer you’re off, the harder it is to get back up and keep going.
the key thing is: you are trying and your efforts are validated and you have made some progress with your self-discipline and studying. forgive yourself and move on.

remember: don’t get discouraged
the longest journey starts with a single step (◕ᴗ◕✿)

hope this helped and good luck! if you’d like to request a post, go here and if you’d like to see more helpful posts, go here!! thanks :)

a honest study guide

As I am usually a straight A student, I thought I’d share some of my favourite study “hacks”, but be warned: i will not be gentle with you. I am going to tell you the brutal truth about getting great marks, because it is no use sugarcoating the fact that school is actually super hard work! 

discipline beats motivation

to be honest no matter how perfect your/any studyblr might be, looking at a blog will unfortunately never ever motivate you to study as hard as you will have to to get an A. Studyblrs may inspire you, but the one thing which will really get you studying is discipline. So, as cruel as it may sound, force yourself to be productive and you will get some serious work done.

Originally posted by prettylittleworldoflies

have no social life

… at least on some days. if you find it difficult to fit your studies into your social life, try reversing the whole thing. Don’t make plans with your friends on days during which you want/need to study. This definitely isn’t fun, I know, but for me, I often find it difficult to get work done when I have plans later that day as firstly, getting a certain amount of work done within a strict time limit stresses me out and secondly, you should definitely use all the time you can get - especially shortly before the upcoming exam.

Originally posted by geeky-ness

all-nighters equal bad time management

truth be told good students normally won’t have to pull all nighters as sleep is very important for not only your concentration but also for your health. To make sure that you get enough rest you should start studying as early as possible, for me that is normally one week before the particular exam, and plan what you will do on which day without trying to fit everything into the last minute. That will leave you relaxed, well rested and concentrated on the day of your exam.

Originally posted by suitelikechocolate

find something that keeps you going

i usually drink a lot of coffee when i am studying, because during a hard study session i need to stay focused and awake. If you don’t like coffee, you could also go for black tea or green tea or simply some fruit as it is very important to get some vitamins (or in my case caffeine) in your system to not fall asleep while working.

Originally posted by whymywriteriscrying

ask for help

whether you swap notes with your colleagues or you mail the professor some questions doesn’t matter at all. It’s only important that you accept that you probably won’t be able to do everything on your own, so find yourself a study partner, ask questions when something seems unclear to you or even get a tutor. And definitely don’t be embarrassed about asking questions! Nobody knows everything.

Originally posted by adolescencia-turbulenta

no distractions

studying is boring and you might find that music makes it a little more exciting, but often listening to music or taking a lot of breaks is only keeping you from getting work done. So suck it up and study either silently, to classical music or to relaxing noises you can find on the internet. Also try not to take too many breaks. Don’t overwork yourself, of course, but also try to stay focused for longer than 15 minutes as this will allow you to be more productive and don’t study with friends if you end up chit-chatting to each other instead of working.

Originally posted by droneandting

write everything down

even if you have a good memory, you won’t be able to remember a thing after class, so suck it up, don’t talk to your desk mate and focus on writing everything important down what the teacher says. even if you get handed enough material there will still be things which you should write down such as explanations, examples and additional information. that will help you later on to understand what you are actually studying.

Originally posted by teendotcom

you absolutely need to study

don’t ever think, no matter how much attention you’ve paid in class or how good you are at a certain subject, that you won’t have to study. there is always work to get done and if you are already good at something work on being better to excel at academics. 

Originally posted by dadgan

(i added fun gifs, because it seemed a little too harsh - good luck, babes, you are going to pass your exams) 

Try to get up early! I know a lot of people who like to sleep in, but I also know some who don’t feel productive if they don’t get up early. Getting up early (and not necessarily super early, maybe one or two hours later than you’d get up for school) on the weekend or on a day off gets you moving and ready to start your day. 

Do some sort of exercise early in the day. It doesn’t have to be intense or a lot, but get moving. It could be anything from an actual workout to just walking to a bookstore or coffeeshop to start your day.

Eat breakfast! If you don’t like getting up early, eating a really good breakfast can make your day. And if you do get up early, you’ll have enough time to actually make something.

Schedule your day. Don’t schedule it down to the last minute, but schedule the big things you need to get done. If you need an alert on your phone or computer to remind you, some good calendars I recommend are: Timepage, Google Calendar, Schoolhub Students(not necessarily a calendar but the best I’ve used for tracking assignments),  and Outlook Calendar(ok so Sunrise was THE BEST calendar app I have ever used but it was discontinued and kind of moved to Outlook).

Write down absolutely everything you need to accomplish. Do this first. It doesn’t matter how big or how small it is, just do it. It might be a pretty long list, and that’s ok. If you have bigger tasks, like writing a paper, break it down further into something like research, brainstorm, thesis, etc. You can further break those down too. The eventual goal is to break down the massive tasks into small, manageable things that you can handle so you don’t feel overwhelmed. 

Prioritize the things you need to do. What I generally tend to do is prioritize the assignments and tests that are coming up first, but if I have a bigger test after them, that can become an equal priority. So for example, if I have a worksheet due first period tomorrow, a quiz fourth period that same day, and a major test two days away, I would do the worksheet first, do about half my studying for the major test, study for the quiz, then finish my studying for the major test. 

Get started on something! Once you’ve got all your ducks in a row, get to work. If music helps you focus, listen to it, or if wearing a comfy sweater helps you destress, wear it. Find what works for you and use it to your advantage. 

Don’t forget to take breaks. Use something to help you time your breaks- I personally like to use forest, but one that I’ve tried and liked is flat tomato. Do something you like during your breaks- your brain needs time to process what you’ve been working on. 

Try to get all of your work done before evening- but if you don’t get it all done, it’s not the end of the world. Use this time for yourself, so watch a good movie, eat dinner, play an instrument, whatever makes you happy. This is your self-care time- you work hard and you deserve it!

-keaton

The Road To Good Grades

[Warning - A Very Lengthy Post]

A fellow student of mine wrote this when for my batch when we entered high school, and I thought I should share it with you ❤️ it’s been edited to make it more universal to you guys :D

Intro: Having the Courage to Study.
When we fail academically, we tend to point to two causes: stupidity and laziness. It’s so easy to say that we’re not smart enough, or that we just don’t want to try because it doesn’t really matter. But there’s another factor involved: fear. So many students have the strategy of not studying or not studying properly for an exam. Why? Because if you put low effort into something, then you should expect a low result. So many of us are afraid of trying and failing that we don’t even try. “What if my best isn’t good enough?” We’re afraid of giving our best because once we know our limits, we feel that much weaker. But life in school isn’t about not trying, it’s about accepting those limits and breaking them.To survive and ultimately thrive, you must have the courage to reach your full potential.That courage, that vigor, that strive to be better is what will keep you alive, not just in school but in the real world.

Guide:
- Sleep and Eat well.
We often lose sleep or skip meals in order to survive the rigors of life.But keep in mind, those choices in the rest and nourishment you receive have consequences. Having the energy to focus throughout the day is vital. Nobody wants to be tired, nobody can afford to be sick.

- Pay Attention in Class.
There’s a difference between passive hearing and active listening. Letting the teacher’s words wash over you like a warm shower is NOT the same as paying attention. Teachers are human beings, capable of expressing emotion and emphasis in their words and actions. There’s a reason why you learn from them rather than from a book or the internet. Catching what they’re trying to say is a skill that takes effort to learn.

**The skill of listening is one of the most important ones to develop because a teacher’s words are your last resort in an examination. If a quiz catches you by surprise, your memory of the class is the difference between A+ and an F.

- Take USABLE Notes.
Normally, humans are not capable of memorizing lessons entirely in their head.That’s what notes are for. Keep in mind that notes should be USABLE, they are not things that you make for the sake of looking or feeling productive. Each person has a specific style of learning and their notes should reflect that. Notes that are too long/elaborate, too short/simple, unreadable, or illogical are detrimental. Good notes should be aids in studying, not justification for carrying notebooks.

**Tips:
- Save time by using abbreviations or acronyms.
- Rearrange/reconstruct words or phrases for convenience.
ex. Famous Authors of America –> Impt. American Authors.
- Avoid copying verbatim unless necessary (quotes).
- Write down examples, esp. in science/math related subjects.
- If notes are incomplete, supplement them via reliable sources or your teacher.

- Practice.
There is more to studying than reading/note-taking. Practice is essential. This is especially true for Math-related subjects. Reading your notes before a Math exam is not really going to help you understand the problem or protect you from careless mistakes. The only way to improve in the subject is by doing the exercises and learning from both your success and failure. Memorizing definitions isn’t as important as using them. Being able to analyze, compare, and contrast is vital to survival.

- Review a Little Bit, Regularly.
Slow and steady wins the race. Students tend to read a ton of material before an exam. However, the human mind requires time in order to fully grasp ideas and concepts. Taking 10-20 minutes to read your notes after school daily can help in memorizing lessons, understanding themes, and recalling important points. Taking every subject’s lessons day by day will prevent you from being overwhelmed.

**Tip:
- When reading through your notes, picture yourself in the classroom with your classmates and teacher. The human mind is like a web, connected by images and sounds. Doing so can help you recall things written on the board or things mentioned by the teacher.

- Learn to Plan and Cram.
Working for the long-term and rushing for the short-term are two opposing ends of the spectrum. But if you don’t master both, you will suffocate in requirements.Time and energy are limited resources and the best scholars know how to get the most out of them. You can’t expect to be able to plan assignments weeks or days in advance the same way you can’t expect to make “academic excellence” in 30 minutes or less like a pizza delivery service.

**Tips:
- Periodic Exams, Long Tests, and Projects REQUIRE planning and coordination.
- Teachers can take up to 5 minutes setting up. Exploit the time.
- Lunchbreak, and the 20 minute breaks are the normal “"cram periods”“.


- Don’t Think of Difficulty.
“Easy” and “Hard” are relative terms. They mean different things to different people and ultimately, they should mean nothing to you. Feeling scared of a “tough” exam is harmful, as is feeling smug about an “easy” one. Study well so you can approach every test with confidence. Remember: it’s just as possible to perfect a difficult test as it is to fail an easy one.

- Don’t Compare Yourself to Others.
The world has approx. 7 billion people. There are always going to be people who are better than you at a given skill, the same way that there will always be people who are worse. Don’t consider them. Your life is your battle, and you’re going to have to fight it for yourself. Being discouraged by your friends’ high scores is as illogical as being encouraged by their low scores. There’s no reason to be proud of 1/10, even if it’s the highest score in the whole class.

- Don’t Blame Teachers.
Not all of your teachers are going to be fair or good at their jobs, whether you like it or not. Regardless, you can’t control your teacher’s incompetence or harshness but you can control the effort you put into their class. Read in advance, find other of info sources, and predict their requirements. The odds may be against you, but as a student you’re expected to beat them.

- Consult.
There’s no shame in asking for help. If you have difficulty in a subject, it always helps to consult with a teacher. Not only does it help in resolving any misconceptions/mistakes, it shows that you’re willing to take the time and effort to do well. To most teachers, that spirit is just as important as the final grade. Note: if a teacher knows that you have difficulty in their subject, they’ll probably take note of it in class which may be to your benefit.

- Find Your Own Strategy/Work Smart.
No single study strategy works universally. Everyone has their own specific style of learning and it’s up to you to find yours. If skimming through readings works for you then go ahead. If you’re the kind that needs to take notes, fine. It’s all about working both hard and smart, giving the most energy but finding the most effective way of using it. Humans are creative creatures. You might find that the best solution is one that no one has thought of before.

- Be Liable.
You need to be proactive in academics. Many students have the tendency to be caught off guard by a surprise quiz. They’ll often argue with the teacher, using the retort “Ma'am, you didn’t announce it!” as an excuse. Shaking off responsibility through ignorance is suicidal in this school. If you’re willing to take the risk of coming to class unprepared for the sake of being lazy, go ahead. Just be prepared for the consequences of your actions.

- Keep Moving Forward.
You’re human. Humans make mistakes. Learn from your errors but leave them where they belong; in the past. Everyone wants to get an A+ but you’ll never go that far with the weight of your failure hanging over your shoulder.

Conclusion: Don’t Take Academics too Seriously.
It seems counter-intuitive to end this guide with a statement like “Don’t Take Academics Too Seriously” but it’s something that everyone should remember. No matter no hard you try, you will fail at something. You’ll reach an obstacle that will knock you down to the ground and it will hurt like hell. You need to have something to fall back; friends, family, a hobby, an interest, etc. You don’t want to graduate and realize that you’re only good at earning numbers in a system.You could graduate this high school with the highest average in history but it won’t matter to anyone if you don’t know how you got it. Life is just like math, it’s not all
about the final answer. Your solution is just as important.

**Ultimately, your success as a scholar isn’t measured by a number on a piece of paper but in the difference you make in people’s lives. We’re not going to carry facts and theorems with us, but an attitude of trying to give our best no matter what the cost. That’s the most important lesson you can ever learn in school, but you’re not going to learn it from one subject or teacher. You’re going to live it everyday through every requirement and every grade receive.

how to get stuff done

1. invent a deadline for yourself and stick to it. either you finish things early and have free time for other things or you don’t meet your deadline and still have a few days to catch up before it matters

2. celebrate every little achievement. it’s frustrating to wait to get an assignment/exam back because you get no immediate satisfaction. after every task you complete go for a walk, see a friend, cook, get a hot chocolate. feel good about your progress without having to wait for someone else to tell you that you’re doing a good job

3. organise your to-do list using these 4 categories: 

  1. important and urgent - do this now!
  2. important but not urgent - schedule this
  3. not important but urgent - delegate this or schedule it for later
  4. not important and not urgent - don’t do this until you have done everything else

4. divide and conquer. if you have a paper to write divide it up into easy chunks e.g. plan/first draft/second draft/checking etc. and tackle these one at a time. don’t just write ‘history paper’ on your to-do list because you will feel unproductive until you tick it off, even if you are making progress

5. don’t forget to put self-care on your to-do list. make sure every day you write down and tick off ‘drink water’ ‘get some fresh air’ ‘take some time away from the computer’ ‘brush teeth’ ‘shower’. you will feel productive and also be looking after yourself, both of which will boost your general productivity

6. study slots not study tasks. break up your tasks into time slots and write those on your to-do list. instead of ‘revise German Unification’ my to-do list will say ‘1 hour German Unification’. after 1 hour I will stop and tick off that task. then write it again later or the next day if I want to do more. it is easier to quantify tasks (especially humanities/arts revision) by time rather than by topic. 

7. have a visual indicator of your progress. if you think you need to spend 6 hours on German Unification in total then draw a rectangle and divide it in 6 and colour one segment in for every hour you work so you can see your progress. this will serve as motivation and as a reward for hard work

8. find a friend with a similar/better work ethic than you and sit together in a library and study hard. it’s nice to surround yourself with people who are also working hard for motivation, and for someone to talk to during your study breaks

I hope this helps! 

for some unconventional study tips click here or here

Friendly reminder that Koogi was still in school when she started Killing Stalking and graduated before season one ended.

That means she had to balance studying, and taking exams with producing a full colored beautifully drawn, multipanelled webcomic.

She only just graduated, she hasn’t had a proper vacation yet. And although I’m still upset over the hiatus, I understand that she needs this break before she burns out. She NEEDS this break. She isn’t a machine.

Don’t be an ass to Koogi. She works so hard only to be bashed by people who blames her for needing a break from work.

Lately, I’ve been seeing something slightly bothersome around studyblr, and I just want to say something about it. Basically, there seems to be this attitude cropping up (or at least that I’ve seen/heard about more frequently these days) that your grades reflect your level of effort, or that by simply working hard and putting more effort in, your grades will automatically improve. I disagree.

Yes, there are certainly some cases where you’re already proficient in a class and if you just put in the extra time to study, you’d do better. But there are some classes where grades are not a measure of the level of effort you put in, and therein lies my biggest issue with the grading system and these types of studyblr posts in general. This was certainly the case with me in honors physics (so bear with me, because I have a very large point to make with the following anecdote).

Personally, I’ve always had “easy A” classes where I don’t have to work hard; my brain and academic strengths simply favor me in that particular subject, so with minimal effort I can still be top in the class. And then I see peers who go in for tutoring every day, who spend hours studying and meeting with teachers, who basically invest 100 times the effort I do… and still can’t get above a B or C.

This is not to mention people who take classes that are “reaches” and, accordingly, don’t do so well – even though they work hard – because it’s a challenge. Then there are those who take lower level classes but have capabilities beyond that – and don’t need to put effort in – thus giving them an unfairly easy A. Does their A mean that they work harder? That they’re a better student, studier, scholar, intellectual? Hell to the no.

English is one of those “easy A” classes for me. I’m just innately strong in verbal-linguistic intelligence (going off of Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences), so I’ve literally never had to study for English tests or reading comp/writing. But put me in other classes, particularly science classes? Well, that’s something else entirely.

Which brings me to junior year honors physics. 

Guys, I studied my ASS off, for hours at a time. I desperately Skyped people in my class nearly every night to try to understand the homework and spent every lunch block trying to master the material. I met with my physics teacher and tutor all the time and had a dozen anxiety attacks (and I mean actual, diagnosed anxiety attacks) over that one class because I tried harder than I’ve ever tried… and I got a B for the whole year. I was the one who dreaded seeing that red number scrawled on my test, who shoved it into my backpack before others could see and blinked back tears, thinking, But I studied so hard!

Physics was a nightmare I was desperate to forget by the end of junior year. But then a couple things happened that shocked me, and I instantly thought of them when I read some of these posts about good effort = good grades.

Now, my physics teacher, who has a reputation for being on the strict side and being a tough grader, has had four teaching assistants (TAs) in five years of teaching. Most science teachers at my school have as many as five a year. At the end of 11th grade, after I’d scraped by with a B in his class, he asked me if I wanted to be a TA. Out of the entire grade – out of the multitude of students I’d watched parade past with straight A’s and “that test was so easy” and “I barely studied” and “sorry Edye I don’t know how else to explain it to you” – he chose me.

I think I (very graciously) blurted out, “What? Why?” because I was so taken aback. He said that I was hardworking and dedicated – that I’d always gone above and beyond in my studying and meeting with him – and he wanted someone like me to be a TA. I was flattered, and I thoroughly enjoyed being a TA during senior year. (Also, anyone who doesn’t think he’s super nice is incredibly wrong. He’s awesome.)

Two years later, I got to read his college recommendation for me. Bear in mind that I was not, based on my grades, a top student in his class. And this is what he wrote for his opening line:

Honors Physics is a rigorous course that draws from the strongest students in the junior class and Edye proved to be one of those students.

What? He had seen my report card, right? I got worse grades than all of my friends. I got a goddamn 66 on a test in that class, my all time low. He continued:

One of the many examples of Edye’s commitment [is when she] had been ill and missed quite a bit of school and consequently had a lot of school work to make up in all of her classes.  Many students in this situation would take one or more classes pass / fail for the quarter; Edye would not take the pass/fail option and insisted she complete all the work and complete it with the grade she would earn.  She did in fact complete all of the work and with a B-.  A remarkable accomplishment considering she kept current with her studies while making up all of the missed work.

He called a B-minus “a remarkable accomplishment.” Did he say “too bad she didn’t put enough effort in, which was reflected in a B-minus” or “she only got a B-minus, so I guess she didn’t try hard enough”? No, he praised the amount of effort I put in, even though I didn’t even get a “good” grade.

I’m hardly one to knock putting in effort, but what bothers me is that this attitude, that effort = good grades, has the potential to make people feel bad. To feel like if they aren’t acing a class even though they’re studying harder than anybody else, well, they just aren’t trying hard enough. Yes, grades are important. So is effort. But they are not always directly correlated. As is evidenced by my story, sometimes people who get lower grades have worked even harder then those who got high grades. And, if they’re lucky, this will be acknowledged. (I can certainly attest that while I’ve been praised by English teachers for my writing skills and intellect, they’ve never singled me out for putting in an exceptional amount of effort. They know that while I’m proactive and responsible, I don’t try super hard because, well, I don’t really need to in order to get a good grade.)

Encourage other students to put in a reasonable amount of effort; recommend different study methods. But don’t tell them that good effort = good grades. Teach them to measure their success by looking at how productive they’re being, how proactive they are in reaching out for help, how dedicated they are to their education, how resilient they are in the face of obstacles, how committed they are to school. Admire those who refuse to take the easy way out, even if they only get a C. These qualities, which are far more important than a 4.0, just don’t always translate directly into good grades.

I dislike seeing this message all over Tumblr, that to get better grades you just have to try harder – which carries with it the implication that if you don’t get good grades, it’s because you aren’t putting enough effort in – when I know from firsthand experience that this is not always true. I strongly believe in trying to be the best student you can be, rather than trying to be in the top 5%. But in the end, do what works for you. Just take it with a grain of salt.

And to my followers, and anyone reading this… please know that, if you work hard regardless of your grades, you are already a model student, and you are absolutely someone I look up to.

In light of me graduating tomorrow, I’ve decided to make a bit of a guide for those younger students who have not yet experienced college. Keep in mind, I am American and attended an American university while living on campus.

LAUNDRY/CLOTHING/FASHION

  • hand wash your intimates (panties and bras). they’ll last longer.
  • don’t get wrapped up in sticking to an aesthetic. just wear what’s clean
  • hang the next day’s outfit on your closet door
  • have one outfit for every occasion
  • invest in plain solid colored tops, a business formal and business casual outfit, and comfortable shoes
  • fold a plain t-shirt, roll it up tiny and stick it in a bag. keep this in your everyday bag if possible in the event a guy named Eric spills coffee on you in Bio
  • use scarves, plaid shirts, belts, ties, etc to spice up your wardrobe. but also, its fine to wear the sweatpants and hoodie to every class

THE LIBRARY

  • don’t get attached to just one singular spot. explore like you’re in a video game looking for hidden items.
  • sometimes you end up working in the library for their full operating hours. keep a travel bag with toothbrush/toothpaste/floss, mini bottle of face wash, pads/tampons, pain reliever, hair ties, and chapstick. just in case you stay until 2am at closing and you have an 8am and you know you won’t get much sleep.
  • have cash on you, have money on your student card, have your ID with you at all times and USE EVERY RESOURCE they offer.
  • minimize how much you bring. my library had desktop computers but also you can borrow macs and ipads for a period of time. also, they have chargers you can borrow.
  • photocopy, print, scan, etc is your friend. borrow a textbook from a friend for a day and have your own copy in minutes at the library.
  • follow the rules of the land. don’t be that guy/girl/person.

FOOD/DINING HALL

  • plan your meals
  • budget your meal plan so you don’t end up starving during finals week
  • KNOW EVERY SINGLE DEAL/SALE/SPECIAL OFFERED AT FAST FOOD JOINTS
  • eat with others, especially when you’re struggling to get food
  • if it isn’t essential, don’t buy it
  • never shop hungry
  • make lists before you grocery shop. shop more on the outer rings of the stores where the fresh, healthy food is
  • DRINK WATER
  • cook like you’re trying to survive a harsh winter. leftovers that last. carbs and protein heavy.
  • have family send you care packages with essentials you can’t get where you are.
  • GET THE RECIPES FOR YOUR FAVORITE HOMECOOKED MEALS

CLASSES

  • unless you invented mornings or are the god Apollo, please refrain from taking 8AM classes
  • never make big gaps in between your classes in one day. schedules should maximize efficiency. have enough time to eat and pee between classes and nothing more.
  • office hours. go to them. no matter what your status in the class is. you want those letter of recommendations, don’t you?
  • sit in the front
  • do the readings, write down questions you have, take good notes, make sure all your questions are answered before class is over
  • make friends with your classmates. emailing the whole class to get notes you missed is a huge nono
  • make money by being someone’s note-taker
  • go to tutoring sessions
  • make besties with your TA

STUDYING/HOMEWORK

  • never work on outside assignments in class
  • start the day you get an assignment even if it’s due next month
  • the minute you start a new unit, prepare for that inevitable test
  • you should spend hours studying for each subject. daily. for the best results
  • online homework is hard to remember. make phone alerts
  • download apps that won’t let you procrastinate on your computer when you need to study. i use writer’s block.
  • study before you go to bed, then pause and continue once you wake up

PUBLIC SPEAKING/PRESENTATIONS

  • record yourself while you practice
  • don’t stare at one person the whole time you’re speaking. pick three in different locations around the room
  • if you need to pause and look at your notes, do it naturally and comfortably. even announce that you’re taking a second to check your notes
  • take frequent short pauses to avoid saying uhhh and ummm while you’re trying to remember something
  • ask that your audience save questions for the end
  • practice (3x)
  • perform your script to a friend first. have them act as your audience, teacher, and the bad scenarios that can happen when you prepare but everything goes to shit