no one cares nathaniel

100% these Paris students would rise against injustice, bigotry, and fear.

La Résistance.

  • Nathaniel: Look. I just think smoking is bad.
  • Castiel: Oh my God.
  • Castiel: Really?
  • Castiel: Oh, that's the best advice ever! Lys, quick, take notes!
  • Lysander: I can't.
  • Castiel: He can't.
  • Lysander: I lost my notepad.
  • Castiel: Oh, damn, we're out of notepads.
  • Nathaniel: You lost your notepad again?!
  • Castiel: It's called sarcasm, Nathaniel, no one cares about what you have to say.
  • Lysander: No, I actually lost my notepad.
  • Castiel: Again?!

So episode 29 is like

Originally posted by gameraboy

But also a lot of this:

Originally posted by universexy

And the fandom to Candy right now is

Originally posted by react-gif

Jeb Bush In 1995: “Unwed Mothers Should Be Publicly Shamed”

Jeb Bush: “One of the reasons more young women are giving birth out of wedlock and more young men are walking away from their paternal obligations is that there is no longer a stigma attached to this behavior, no reason to feel shame. Many of these young women and young men look around and see their friends engaged in the same irresponsible conduct. Their parents and neighbors have become ineffective at attaching some sense of ridicule to this behavior. There was a time when neighbors and communities would frown on out of wedlock births and when public condemnation was enough of a stimulus for one to be careful.”

Bush points to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1850 novel The Scarlet Letter, in which the main character is forced to wear a large red “A” for “adulterer” on her clothes to punish her for having an extramarital affair that produced a child, as an early model for his worldview. “Infamous shotgun weddings and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter are reminders that public condemnation of irresponsible sexual behavior has strong historical roots,” Bush wrote.

↳ As governor of Florida in 2001, Bush had the opportunity to test his theory on public shaming. He declined to veto a very controversial bill that required single mothers who did not know the identity of the father to publish their sexual histories in a newspaper before they could legally put their babies up for adoption. He later signed a repeal of the so-called “Scarlet Letter” law in 2003 after it was successfully challenged in court.

Read the full HuffPost article »here