no citizen left behind

4

An Examination of Every Instance Where Alexander Hamilton Explicitly Stated His Love for John Laurens

Cold in my professions, warm in my friendships, I wish, my Dear Laurens, it might be in my power, by action rather than words, to convince you that I love you_ - Alexander Hamilton to John Laurens, April 1779

We all love you sincerely; but I have more of the infirmities of human nature, than the others and suspect my self of being byassed by my partiality for you. - Alexander Hamilton to John Laurens, June 30, 1780

I feel the deepest affliction at the news we have just received of the loss of our dear and inestimable friend Laurens.  His career of virtue is at an end_  How strangely are human affairs conducted, that so many excellent qualities could not ensure a more happy fate?_  The world will feel the loss of a man who has left few like him behind, and America of a citizen whose heart realized that patriotism of which others only talk_  I feel the loss of a friend I truly and most tenderly loved, and one of a very small number. - Alexander Hamilton to Nathanael Greene, October 12, 1782

Poor Laurens; he has fallen a sacrifice to his ardor in a trifling skirmish in South Carolina.  You know how truly I loved him and will judge how much I regret him. - Alexander Hamilton to the Marquis de Lafayette, November 3, 1782

The Last Novelization: Chapter 4 Part 1

It’s finally done! What do you mean it’s been six months?

So, I guess we get a lot of novel exclusive content this time… *shrugs* The next few sections will have more NaruHina. Also, this is the final chapter with eight parts, and after that is the epilogue, so we’re almost at the end.

*takes deep breath*

I don’t know when I will have the next part done, so do NOT ask!

If this isn’t obvious by this point, I don’t even know what to tell you. Also, I’ve added a frequently asked questions page to my blog. I don’t mean to deter anyone from sending asks, but please refer to that first.

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Please link back to this post if you use ANY part of this translation.

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6

”Nobody had really heard the story of a citizen child left behind, even though it happens to so many people, so many families. You know when you’re undocumented in this country, you think you have no rights. For the most part you feel less than. Because you’re not supposed to be here, because everybody is telling you that, you can’t be here.” (x)

Japan Keeps This Defunct Train Station Running for Just One Passenger
The train makes only two stops—one when a lone high-school student leaves for school and the other when she returns.

For years, there’s only been one passenger waiting at the Kami-Shirataki train station in the northernmost island of Hokkaido, Japan: A high-school girl, on her way to class. The train stops there only twice a day—once to pick up the girl and again to drop her off after the school day is over.

It sounds like a Hayao Miyazaki film. But according to CCTV News, it was a decision that Japan Railways—the group that operates the country’s railway network—made more than three years ago.


At that time, ridership at the Kami-Shirataki station had dramatically fallen because of its remote location, and freight service had ended there as well. Japan Railways was getting ready to shut the station down for good—until they noticed that it was still being used every day by the high-schooler. So they decided to keep the station open for her until she graduates. The company’s even adjusted the train’s timetable according to the girl’s schedule. The unnamed girl is expected to graduate this March, which is when the station will finally be closed.

People are tipping their hats to the Japanese government for making education a top priority. “Why should I not want to die for a country like this when the government is ready to go an extra mile just for me,” one commenter wrote on CCTV’s Facebook page. “This is the meaning of good governance penetrating right to the grassroot level. Every citizen matters. No Child left behind!”

Others, like the creator behind this YouTube video, grieve over the struggling railways of rural Japan. With the country’s record-low birthrate, aging population, and the threat of losing a third of its population by 2060, Japan faces a number of crises including a surplus of vacant housing and a shrinking workforce. The nation’s railroad system is being hit by these shifts.

Japan’s impressively efficient high-speed rails have continued to expand to the outskirts of the country, rendering many of Japan’s older, low-tech railways obsolete. Kami-Shirataki station, for example, sits in the town of Engaru in the rural part of Hokkaido, which lost at least 20 rail lines in the past few decades, according to Fortune.

But if this story of a young girl and her special connection to the Kami-Shiratki station is any indicator, Japan’s disappearing rural railroads will be remembered for their service to even the most remote parts of the country.

I feel the deepest affliction at the news we have just received of the loss of our dear and inestimable friend Laurens. His career of virtue is at an end. How strangely are human affairs conducted, that so many excellent qualities could not ensure a more happy fate? The world will feel the loss of a man who has left few like him behind, and America of a citizen whose heart realized that patriotism of which others only talk. I feel the loss of a friend I truly and most tenderly loved, and one of a very small number.
—  Alexander Hamilton to Nathanael Greene, October 12, 1782

anonymous asked:

Are there any accounts of how Hamilton reacted to Laurens death or how he behaved after

We have two responses from Hamilton to Laurens’s death.

Alexander Hamilton to the Marquis de Lafayette, November 3, 1782 (written in a postscript):

Poor Laurens; he has fallen a sacrifice to his ardor in a trifling skirmish in South Carolina. You know how truly I loved him and will judge how much I regret him.

Alexander Hamilton to Nathanael Greene, October 12, 1782:

I feel the deepest affliction at the news we have just received of the loss of our dear and ⟨inesti⟩mable friend Laurens. His career of virtue is at an end. How strangely are human affairs conducted, that so many excellent qualities could not ensure a more happy fate? The world will feel the loss of a man who has left few like him behind, and America of a citizen whose heart realized that patriotism of which others only talk. I feel the loss of a friend I truly and most tenderly loved, and one of a very small number.

You may be thinking, “Wow, Hamilton really didn’t write a lot about the death of a guy that he supposedly loved.”  And that’s exactly the point.  Hamilton wrote, from the letters that we have, seven sentences in total about Laurens’s death.  For Hamilton, seven sentences is practically nothing.  His life revolved around writing.  Hamilton could probably give you a 50-page essay on any topic, no matter how trivial.  The fact that Hamilton wrote seven sentences about Laurens’s death means that A) Hamilton literally could not find the words to to express what he was feeling, and B) Hamilton was so emotionally devastated by Laurens’s death that he couldn’t even bring himself to write about the topic.  (A similar thing happened when Hamilton’s son Philip died in a duel - he took several months to write back to people about it, and he wrote very little.)  Hamilton shut down emotionally for quite a while after Laurens died.  He never really formed another relationship that matched the closeness he had with Laurens.  We don’t know how Hamilton learned about Laurens’s death or his immediate reaction to this news, but it’s safe to say that he was deeply affected emotionally.

I was to be a bride, but whose? My father had assured me that the Council of Citizens would let me know the moment they decided.

THE YEAR IS 2124, AND THE UNITED STATES HAS CEASED TO EXIST AS WE KNOW IT. After a plague swept across the nation over a hundred years ago ( some said it was a government conspiracy, to weed out the poor and feebleamong them. Some said it was a biological accident, a chemical leak from some underground lab that spread like fire amongst the people. Some said it was biological warfare, a toxic and invisible killer sent in from the Middle East, from Russia, from Cuba, from anyone who wasn’t us. Some said it was an act of God, a second coming, a new flood. Whatever it was, there was one thing everyone agreed on –– it was EFFECTIVE. ) the country had to reinvent itself. There were too few people to ever return to the way things were at the start of the nation, especially given that the plague had targeted a rather suspicious amount of women, and so those remaining, those left behind, banded together to form the Council of Citizens. Anyone over the age of eighteen was allowed to petition the Council for a seat amongst them. Anyone over the age of eighteen had the right to demand a say in the way they were governed. As the years went on, the Council became more and more elite.

The new laws were simple, uncomplicated, and straightforward. They centered around and focused on being a good and productive human, on contributing to the new society and world, on being O B E D I E N T. The most important law, the only one that really mattered, was officially titled ORDINANCE NUMBER SEVENTEEN. Unofficially, it’s referred to as THE MARRIAGE LAW.

The ordinance is thus: At the age of eighteen, a young woman shall be paired and partnered with an eligible young man, wherein they will have thirty days to be wed. Their new home shall be provided for them by the government, and a stipend shall be allotted to the female and her parents for her service and loyalty to her country. The couple shall have one year to produce a child, or face the consequences, including but not limited to –– ( the following lines have been blacked out of all public records and texts, and do not pick up until after the consequences are explained in absolutely no detail. ) After a fourth child is produced, or after three female children have been produced, the couple will then be free to part ways if desired. The female, however, will once again be contracted into a marriage within the bounds of another year. Any and all questions about this ordinance can be directed to the Secretary of the Council.

There are stories, of course, of girls who were matched up to men twenty years their senior, of girls who tried to run off in the night. Those girls were always dragged back into the marriage, or never heard from again.

The day the letter arrives for you is a simple day, unlike any other day, save for the irregular mail delivery, for the letter in a pristine white envelope, addressed to you from the Council. Inside this envelope, you know, is the name of your match. Inside this envelope, for good or for bad, is your future.

The Council of Citizens thanks you for your service.


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Stay Down Part 3 (Pietro Maximoff Imagine)

Bullets and pieces of brick and plaster flew around you, the air filled with screams of terror, sadness, and panic. You were taking out Ultron’s bots left, right, and centre, but no matter how hard you fought, it wasn’t enough. You were constantly surrounded by them. Pietro had dashed off to help clear out the rest of the citizens that had been trapped or left behind, even though Tony had instructed that you were to stay together at all times.

“Can’t afford to lose more valuable people than we have already,” he had grumbled, before blasting off in his Iron Man suit, along with Thor. But, the moment you and Pietro had separated from the rest of the group, you turned to him, and pointed down the street, “Listen to me; you and your sister grew up in this place. You know it better than any of us, and I need you to go and fetch any people who have been left behind or have gotten lost. I want to make sure there’ll be no civilian casualties today, understood?” Your tone of authority had clearly taken Pietro by surprise, but he nodded and was about to run off, when he suddenly turned around to face you, “You know, you were attractive before, but now you’re even more so.”

You felt your face heat up, before you simply shook your head and waved at him, “Get going, Speedy. Every minute counts.” Pietro gave you one last look, before quietly saying “Be safe, alright?”. You nodded, before you turned around and ran in the opposite direction, towards the town square. You couldn’t ignore the pounding of your heart in your chest, nor the heat that was rising to your face, but then you remembered the destiny of an agent; you weren’t going to have time for romance, you wouldn’t ever get married, you wouldn’t ever have a family. In fact, you were most likely going to die whilst on a mission. And that was what saddened you most; ever since Pietro stepped into your life, you were starting to believe that maybe an agent’s destiny was not going to be yours.

After quite a while, you couldn’t help but worry about Pietro; what if he had been gunned down somewhere in the city? Or gotten trapped and was dying somewhere? What if, what if, what if? These thoughts kept running through your mind until they had brought you to tears. You didn’t want him to die, not in the slightest. You may have owed him one, but your desire to keep him alive was driven by more than that; you loved the young man. That thought scared you, but the thought of him dying was twice as scary. All of a sudden, you couldn’t handle it anymore; you fell against the wall of the building you were hiding behind, curled up into a tight little ball, and just cried. It wasn’t something you did often, so now you were just unleashing all your emotions at once.

You heard a whooshing sound nearby, and you tried to stifle your crying. You got to your feet, wiped your eyes, and drew your gun to make it seem as though it wasn’t you who had been crying. “Hello?” You heard Pietro call out, and you quickly plastered a fake smile on your face, before running out from behind the building. “Pietro! Over here!” You yelled, waving at the blonde young man. He dashed over to you in a second, but the moment he laid eyes on you, you could see that he sensed something was wrong. “What happened, (Y/N)? Are you alright?” He asked gently, and you gave an even faker grin, “Never better.” You could see that he wasn’t buying it, but he said nothing. Instead, he just gently hugged you to him; his scent enveloped you and his arms provided a shelter and warmth you had never felt before.

After a little while, you broke the hug, and cleared your throat, “We should probably get off this wretched floating place.” Pietro gave a solemn nod, watching your face carefully, before he suddenly scooped you up and sped off. The wind blew your hair wildly, and tears stung your eyes, but it was exhilarating all the same. You were about to get into one of the refuge ships, when you suddenly spotted Clint retrieving a wounded boy, and Ultron approaching in his aircraft, firing his machine gun. Before you could process the situation, Pietro had dashed off from your side, and by the time the dust has settled, all you saw was Clint holding the boy, a bus blocking them from Ultron, and Pietro-

A scream left your throat before you could stop it. Pietro was covered in red patches, holes in his suit all over the place. You ran towards him and faintly heard him say, “You didn’t see that coming?” before he collapsed to the ground. A scream of agony and utmost pain rang out from the church, and you saw Wanda on her knees, screaming as tears went down her face. You quickly cradled Pietro’s limp body in your arms, and you looked around as tears went down your face. Clint stood there, in utmost shock, and Steve was running towards you. You looked down at Pietro, and suddenly, through a hole in his suit, you saw a scar from a wound. A wound that you had healed. It was time.

You laid Pietro’s body down on the ground, but when Steve went to grab him, you stopped him, “No, please. Just, let me do this.” Steve and Clint shared a confused look, and you simply smiled. “I was an experiment too, just like him and his sister were. Except, my power is to heal. Not destroy. And I can exchange my life for his,” you explained quietly, grabbing Pietro’s limp hand. “(Y/N), you can’t! We need you!” Clint exclaimed, looking absolutely horrified. But again, you just smiled, “I’m an Agent, Clint. My destiny is to die on a mission, and if saving someone else’s life is the price to pay, I’ll pay it gladly. He…..he has so much more to live for; a sister, a future, you guys…….” You looked down at Pietro, and you focused all your energy on him. You knew your eyes turned bright pink, and your hand, which was holding his, glowed gold. His wounds started to heal, and the blood began to heal. His whole body began to glow gold, and you felt yourself growing weaker, more tired.

Just as the last of Pietro’s wounds were healing, you looked over at Steve and Clint, “Guys? Tell Pietro that I loved him and explain why I did this, alright? If you don’t, I’ll haunt you till the day you die.” The two men chuckled, but had tears welling in their eyes. Your eyes started to droop, and suddenly, you felt pressure in your hand; Pietro was squeezing your hand. You gazed upon his face one last time, planted a gentle kiss to his forehead, then each of his cheeks, and finally his lips, before you laid down on the ground next to him. You closed your eyes, and you welcomed death like an old friend. You weren’t afraid.

THIRD PERSON POV

Clint and Steve watched both sadly and in wonder as (Y/N) lay next to Pietro, both of them looking as if they were in a blissful sleep. When suddenly, the gold light died out, and Pietro sat up, gasping for air. “W-What, I-” he panted, looking up at Steve and Clint. He looked down next to him to see (Y/N) lying there peacefully, a small childish smile on her face, her hand in his. “(Y/N)? (Y/N), wake up!” Pietro said, shaking (Y/N). But she didn’t move a muscle. Pietro’s heart shattered, and tears started going down his face. “(Y/N) said she could save you, and that it was a price she was glad to pay. She said she loved you and that she did it because she knew you had so much more to live for than she did,” Clint whispered, as the young man sobbed into the hair of his beloved. “She was one of the things I had to live for, and now she’s dead,” Pietro sobbed into (Y/N)’s hair as he hugged her tightly to him, kissing her forehead and her lips gently, “I love you.”

Soon, the rest of the team had arrived, and had received the same horrid news. They all mourned (Y/N), but nobody seemed as destroyed as Pietro was. She no longer owed him one, but he owed her her life’s worth. Wanda, who had been rejoicing her brother’s revival, quickly fell back into grief as she saw her brother’s pain. But, (Y/N) would always be with them; Pietro would always have a part of (Y/N) with him, the part that was the most important. So, she would never truly be gone. Not as long as they remembered.

anonymous asked:

When and how did Hamilton find out about Laurens' death? I think I heard somewhere that he heard about it like a month before Laurens' family.

We don’t know exactly how Hamilton learned of Laurens’s death.  Many papers published reports of his death, so Hamilton could have learned it from this.  It’s also possible that someone could have written to Hamilton about Laurens’s death since many knew how close they were.  Hamilton’s first mention of Laurens’s death came in an October 12, 1782 letter to Nathanael Greene, wherein he wrote:

I feel the deepest affliction at the news we have just received of the loss of our dear and inestimable friend Laurens. His career of virtue is at an end. How strangely are human affairs conducted, that so many excellent qualities could not ensure a more happy fate? The world will feel the loss of a man who has left few like him behind, and America of a citizen whose heart realized that patriotism of which others only talk. I feel the loss of a friend I truly and most tenderly loved, and one of a very small number.

The Laurens family would not learn of John’s death until November 1782, as they were in Europe at the time.  John Adams wrote a letter to Henry Laurens about John’s death, which was dated November 6, 1782.  Henry replied on November 12th.

alexhamiltonofficial  asked:

do you happen to have the source for Hamilton's reaction to Laurens's death ?

“I feel the deepest affliction at the news we have just received of the loss of our dear and inestimable friend Laurens. His career of virtue is at an end. How strangely are human affairs conducted, that so many excellent qualities could not ensure a more happy fate? The world will feel the loss of a man who has left few like him behind, and America of a citizen whose heart realized that patriotism of which others only talk. I feel the loss of a friend I truly and most tenderly loved, and one of a very small number.”

Alexander Hamilton to Nathanael Greene, October 12, 1782

And

“Poor Laurens; he has fallen a sacrifice to his ardor in a trifling skirmish in South Carolina. You know how truly I loved him and will judge how much I regret him.”

Alexander Hamilton to the Marquis de Lafayette, November 3, 1782

ok here it goes

I don’t know how long this will end up but I’m going to talk about the Book 4 finale. I can’t bring myself to call it a series finale because it had no connection to the first half of the show, but here we go.

Before I even begin you should know that after a lot of reflection and looking at everything from every possible angle, I still think overall

  • Book 1 > Book 2 > > > Book 3 > > > Book 4

and as for finales

  • Book 2 > > > Book 1 > … toss-up between Book 3 and 4

This got really long so be warned lol I went off…

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Shanghai's Elite Under Japanese Occupation

The Japanese Empire seized the foreign extraterritories in Shanghai on December 8, 1941. With this, they succeeded where generations of Chinese had failed, wiping out British and French domination of the city and bring it entirely under Asian control. This had been a far-off dream since the early 1800s when the British and French chastised the Qing Emperor during the Opium Wars and had demanded territories in Shanghai as part of the price of peace. Of course, the Westerners lost their power to Japanese control, and that was not welcome to their Chinese hosts either. For the 8,000 citizens of Allied countries who had chosen to remain in Shanghai despite increased pressure by their own governments to leave, life changed drastically. They had held great economic power, financing revolutions and guaranteeing major business deals around the globe. They had built perhaps the most luxurious hotels in the world, racecourses and restaurants and nightclubs that had fueled the city’s cosmopolitan social life for decades. Suddenly, they were paupers. All Allied citizens were registered at the “Enemy Aliens Office.” Each was given a four-inch, bright red armband, stamped with a letter for their nationality and a registration number. The armband was to be worn at all times in public. Furthermore, the Japanese authorities required all Westerners to live on 2,000 Chinese dollars a month. This was intended to bring their living standard down to a lower-class Chinese family (realistically, most Shanghai families survived on much less). Suddenly, the white families found themselves subsisting on what their servants had previously dined on, going without heating in winter and riding overcrowded public transport after the Japanese confiscated all their pricey foreign-made cars.

Two years later, two repatriation ships left Shanghai’s port. One for Britain, one for the US. Those left behind – the vast majority of Allied citizens – were moved to concentration camps. They would remain there for the rest of the war. They could not leave, they possessed only what they had been able to carry on their backs, and they had no contact with the outside world for two years. The camps were given a regular supply of food, however meager, and for that the once-millionaires and international powerbrokers were grateful. The Japanese confined the 20,000 Jews who had arrived in Shanghai in 1938 to a one-mile square neighborhood in the poorer part of what had been the International extraterritory city. But that was fine. They were still given sanctuary – the only city in the world where they were accepted without visas – and allowed to work and practice their religion. Ironically, the European Jews who had fled Axis territories impoverished and with only the clothes on their backs were treated better than the Allied citizens who had once been the toast of the city.

Call To Prayer

This Christmas, Pray for North Korea. Aside from suffering starvation and famine, pain and strife, being stopped from even leaving the city that they happened to be born into.. 200,000 live every day out in a death camp. Normal prison, in any country in the world, is a hideous plight. But in North Korea, there’s no prison library, there’s no degree course, there’s no garden or exercise yard or cafeteria. There’s rats to be eaten, torture handed out at will and no hope at all. 

So, as we enjoy the bounty and joy of South Korean media this Christmas, let’s take time to Pray for the country left behind. 

North Korean citizens, we are with you.