nineteen eighties

How many have you read?

The BBC estimates that most people will only read 6 books out of the 100 listed below. Reblog this and bold the titles you’ve read.

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 Lord of the Rings - J. R. R. Tolkein
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks
18 Catcher in the Rye
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffeneger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma – Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
50 Atonement – Ian McEwan

51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchel
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

Classic Books List

“Why read the classics? A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say.” These are a few recommendations, books everyone should read. Don’t let yourself be convinced they are good: read and decide for yourself!

(no particular order intended)

  • Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
  • The Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
  • North and South - Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Hard Times - Charles Dickens
  • The Karamazov Brothers - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë
  • The Waves - Virginia Woolf
  • Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
  • Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
  • Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
  • Hamlet - William Shakespeare
  • Richard II - William Shakespeare
  • Little Women - Louisa Alcott
  • The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
  • Emma - Jane Austen
  • Anna Karenina - Liev Tolstói
  • Jane Eyre - Charlotte Brontë
  • Romeo and Juliet - William Shakespeare
  • The Age of Innocence - Edith Wharton 
  • Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
  • Lord of The Flies - William Golding
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel García Márquez
  • Persuasion - Jane Austen
  • War and Peace - Liev Tolstói
  • Macbeth - William Shakespeare
  • The Tell-Tale Heart - Edgar Allan Poe
  • Dracula - Bram Stoker
  • The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar - Edgar Allan Poe
  • Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
  • The Metamorphosis - Franz Kafka 
  • Moby Dick - Herman Melville
  • Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf
  • King Lear - William Shakespeare
  • The Fountainhead - Ayn Rand
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four - George Orwell
  • Jean Barois - Roger Martin du Gard
  • Wives and Daughters - Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
  • To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
  • The Catcher in the Rye - J. D. Salinger
  • Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
2

“It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” 

- George Orwell, 1984

This is what March of the Penguins looks like in my dreams. 

(thanks to my sister @less-than-one for what may be the cutest/most amazing drawing of me that I’ve ever seen!)

4

“Saturday, March twenty-fourth, nineteen eighty-four. Shermer High school, Shermer, Illinois. 60062”

Thirty years ago today,
a princess,
a delinquent,
a brain,
a basket-case,
and a jock,
met for detention.

This is a special day.

If he were allowed contact with foreigners, he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate.
—  George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four

“Hiç kuşkusuz, ne zaman izlendiğinizi anlamanız olanaksızdı. Düşünce Polisi'nin, kime ne zaman ve hangi sistemle bağlandığını kestirmek çok zordu. Herkesi her an izliyor da olabilirlerdi. Çıkardığınız her sesin duyulduğunu, karanlıkta olmadığınız sürece her hareketinizin gözetlendiğini varsayarak yaşamak zorundaydınız; zorunda olmak ne söz, artık içgüdüye dönüşmüş bir alışkanlıkla öyle yaşıyordunuz.”

☣️ Dystopian AU Starters ☣️

Send a symbol to see how our characters suffer. 👌

📺  Nineteen Eighty-Four - Our characters live in a world where their every move and every thought is watched by the government. Informants and spies known as the Thought Police are everywhere, and dissenters are taken to the horrifying Room 101. There is no escape. You can only survive.

🔥 Fahrenheit 451 - Our characters live in a world where books are banned, and those who are not “normal” seem to vanish. Any books found will be burned by the “firemen”, armed with gasoline and flamethrowers, and dissenters are tracked down by the fearsome mechanical Hound.

🍊 A Clockwork Orange - Our characters live in a world where young people form oddly-dressed gangs and engage in horrific violence, committing crimes unhindered by adults. 

👩 The Handmaid’s Tale - Our characters live in a world where a religious military dictatorship has been enforced. Fertile women are forced to become Handmaids, and made to conceive for the continuation of the dying human race. They are forbidden from reading and conversation in this world is strictly controlled by a set script. Spies known as Eyes are everywhere, and those who do not conform are sent to die in the irradiated Colonies.

🛒 The Road - Our characters live in a world where an apocalypse event has occurred, barely anyone is left alive, and the environment around them is barren and bleak. Their only hope is travelling to a location they hope still exists. Everyone and everything is a threat, and they must scavenge what they can to survive.

🏃 The Running Man - Our characters live in a world where a totalitarian society has taken over, and a violent game show known as The Running Man exists. A contestant is declared an enemy of the state, and given a 12-hour head start before the Hunters, an elite team of hitmen, are sent to kill them. They can travel anywhere in the world, but viewers earn money for revealing their whereabouts. They earn $100 for every hour they stay alive, extra for killing law enforcement or Hunters, and win a grand prize of $1 billion for surviving for 30 days. Nobody has ever won it.

💭 The Chrysalids - Our characters live in a world where people who are “different” are branded as “blasphemies” and killed without mercy. Any visible variation in genetics can be grounds for being eliminated. However, some have an invisible mutation - they have telepathic abilities.

❌ Harrison Bergeron - Our characters live in a world where everyone is expected to be perfectly equal. People are given “handicaps”. Strong people are made to wear heavy weights. Beautiful people must wear masks. Intelligent people must wear ear radios, which play sounds to stop one’s thoughts. Everyone is equal, but at what cost?

4

Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950)

Better known by his pen name George Orwell, English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.

Orwell’s work continues to influence popular and political culture, and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms, including cold war, Big Brother, Thought Police, Room 101, memory hole, newspeak, doublethink, and thoughtcrime. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: 1. Dust jacket detail from Nineteen Eighty-Four. A Novel by George Orwell. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1949.  2. Dust jacket detail from Coming Up for Air. George Orwell. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1950. Jacket drawing by Hawkins.  3. Dust jacket detail from Keep the Aspidistra Flying. George Orwell. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1956. Jacket design by Milton Glaser.  4. Dust jacket detail from A Clergyman’s Daughter By George Orwell. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, n.d. Jacket design by Seymour Chwast.