nikon-d5200

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Burger with mushrooms onions & cheese by Jack Kennard

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Spaceship Earth at Night by J.L. Ramsaur Photography
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Spaceship Earth is a geodesic sphere that serves as the symbolic structure of Epcot, at the Walt Disney World Resort. One of the most recognizable structures of any theme park, it is also the name of the dark ride attraction that is housed within the sphere that takes guests on a time machine-themed experience using the Omnimover system. The structure is similar in texture to the United States pavilion from Expo 67 in Montreal, but unlike that structure, Spaceship Earth is a complete sphere, supported by three pairs of legs. The architectural design was conceived by Wallace Floyd Design Group. The structural designs of both Expo 67 and Spaceship Earth were completed by Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. of Boston, Massachusetts. Geometrically, Spaceship Earth is derived from the Class 2 geodesic polyhedron with frequency of division equal to 8. Each face of the polyhedron is divided into three isosceles triangles to form each point. In theory, there are 11,520 total isosceles triangles forming 3840 points. In reality, some of those triangles are partially or fully nonexistent due to supports and doors; there are actually only 11,324 silvered facets, with 954 partial or full flat triangular panels. The appearance of being a monolithic sphere is an architectural goal that was achieved through a structural trick. Spaceship Earth is in fact two structural domes. Six legs are supported on pile groups that are driven up to 160 feet into Central Florida’s soft earth. Those legs support a steel box-shaped ring at the sphere’s perimeter, at about 30 degrees south latitude in earth-terms. The upper structural dome sits on this ring. A grid of trusses inside the ring supports two helical structures of the ride and show system. Below the ring, a second dome is hung from the bottom, completing the spherical shape. The ring and trusses form a table-like structure which separates the upper dome from the lower. Supported by and about three feet off the structural domes is a cladding sphere to which the shiny Alucobond panels and drainage system are mounted. The cladding was designed so that when it rains, no water pours off the sides onto the ground. All water is collected through one-inch gaps in the facets into a gutter system, and finally channeled into the World Showcase Lagoon. Technical Information (or Nerdy Stuff): Camera - Nikon D5200 (handheld) Lens – Nikkor 18-300mm Zoom ISO – 1000 Aperture – f/5.6 Exposure – 1/3 second Focal Length – 175mm The original RAW file was processed with Adobe Camera Raw and final adjustments were made with Photoshop CS6. “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” ~Jeremiah 29:11

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Expedition Everest at Disney’s Animal Kingdom by J.L. Ramsaur Photography
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One of the best, and more thrilling rides at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom is this roller coaster called Expedition Everest - Legend of the Forbidden Mountain. An out-of-control train speeding through the Himalayan Mountains while trying to avoid the Abominable Snowman. I am not a big roller coaster fan…but did actually enjoy this one since I promised everyone in my family that I would ride everything while we were on vacation (except the Tower of Terror!). Definitely one of the must ride attractions while at Animal Kingdom… Technical Information: Camera - Nikon D5200 Lens – Nikkor 18-300mm Zoom ISO – 500 Aperture – f/4.2 Exposure – 1/2000 second Focal Length – 32mm The original RAW file was processed with Adobe Camera Raw and final adjustments were made with Photoshop CS6. “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” ~Jeremiah 29:11