nikkor macro

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Sign of spring 6 by Shinichiro Saka
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新宿御苑 寒桜にメジロ

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Singular… Hard to find a bloom more distinctive than the Red Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) that grows in the woodlands of Iowa… the ancient ones crushed seeds to create a love potion…

this one was growing along the old trolley trail that connected Cedar Falls to Waterloo and is now part of our nature trail system… I used a 105mm nikkor macro lens, with a nikkor close-up screw on lens, and a nikon macro light kit all on a Nikon D810, the best camera I ever owned…

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Phidippus Putnami, adult female. Definitely an old girl, fat and slow, with far more curiosity than fear when it comes to humans - a strange phenomenon that occurs when housing salticids for any length of time.  While often incredibly invasive and a illusive in nature, once familiarized with human beings they seem to understand the lack of threat when dealing with those feeding, photographing, and studying them.  This subject was quite small for this species, warranting high magnification and stacking in these photos, which were shot with a 24mm Nikkor reversed by itself, and on tubes (the former simple 2-3 shot stacks, the latter of which demanded 4-6 shot stacks). 

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Xmas eve by Marian Hilditch

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RED by Shinichiro Saka
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日高市 巾着田

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Graphic Design by Marian Hilditch
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新宿寒桜 by Shinichiro Saka
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新宿御苑

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The best thing about yesterday’s visit to the lavender farm wasn’t the view of Mt. Hood and Mt. St. Helens in the background. It wasn’t the sweet smell of lavender in the hot morning sun. The best thing about the trip was seeing the bees. I pulled my car under a big shade tree, and I as soon as I got out I could hear them – untold thousands of honeybees going about their business of gathering nectar.

I sat on the ground between rows of lavender watching them. I didn’t have to move my camera to focus on them. Instead, I held it in one position and just waited a second or two for them to fly into my view. At times there were as many as five or six honeybees all within my frame.

After the better part of an hour I got ready to leave. As I paid for the lavender I had cut, I talked to the owner about the bees. She said that they are always happy to see them come back, but expressed concern that someday they may not. What a sad thought.

Save the honeybees.