night pho

NASA scientist: Earth is in no way prepared for an asteroid collision

  • A recent meeting of the American Geophysical Union explored the likelihood of an impact from outer space — and the findings are somber.
  • According to Joseph Nuth, a researcher with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, humans are ill-prepared for a surprise asteroid or comet.
  • “The biggest problem, basically, is there’s not a hell of a lot we can do about it at the moment,” he told attendees in San Francisco on Monday.
  • According to the Atlantic, NASA started tracking 5,000 potentially hazardous objects, or PHOs, including asteroids.
  • As space rocks are discovered every night, the number of PHOs exceeds 700,000.
  • While large and dangerous asteroids are very rare, Earth is still vulnerable to a comet collision.
  • Comets can approach Earth at a higher speed, which means that it could strike our planet only 18 months after it was detected. Read more

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“Robespierre, haunted by the ghosts of his female victims!”

The above image is meant to depict a scene in Victorien Sardou’s play, Robespierre. On a mission to rescue a victim from the Terror for the purposes of personal comfort, Robespierre gets hounded in the Concierge Prison and by the ghosts of his victims: Camille Desmoulins, Georges Danton, Madame Roland, and even Charlotte Corday all make cameos. Unfortunately for their republican sentiments, they also all bow to the ghost of Queen Marie-Antoinette, implying that they really did have monarchist sentiments all along and that Robespierre’s bloodhounds were right on the money with their accusations. (I mean, I’m just sayin’.)

There’s also some implicit misogyny, with Robespierre’s displays of fright and guilt being described as “womanly,” because only women get frightened of vengeful ghosts who are upset you decapitated them. Manly men like Danton would laugh it off. There’s actually a lot going on here and none of it is necessarily “good.”

The play was later novelized and the prose-version of the scene is under the cut. See for yourself! 

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breathetheroads  asked:

Could you recommend some happy smut filled one shots? AU or otherwise :* Thanks

Here you go:

Midnight Confessions - famousfremus

More Than One Night - loveisallwereallyneedtosurvive

Happy New Year - LBug84

Thaw - alatariel-gildaen

Cold Hands, Warm Heart - sohypothetically

Have Your Cake - Court81981

The Bronco and the Beetle - JennaGill

Under the Mangroves - titania522

I Want Some More - english5672

A Matter of Trust - SassyEverlarking

Under a Watchful Eye - ambpersand

That Night - jawshfuckerson

I Love Pho King - plumgal1899

Admirer - HGRomance

Strangers - HGRomance

Namaste - dispatchesfromdistrict7

Spin - Court81981

No Unicorns - Misshoneywell

Flux and Dustjackets - silvercistern

You Quite So New - atetheredmind

Wish You Were Here - WhatBecomesofYou

Coed - Abagail Snow

Today, Tomorrow, Next Year - cloverleafsky

Who Nibbles the Moon? - annieoakley1

12 Burnt Cupcakes - Tribute45

“Robespierre, haunted by the ghosts of his female victims!”

The above image is meant to depict a scene in Victorien Sardou’s play, Robespierre. On a mission to rescue a victim from the Terror for the purposes of personal comfort, Robespierre gets hounded in the Concierge Prison and by the ghosts of his victims: Camille Desmoulins, Georges Danton, Madame Roland, and even Charlotte Corday all make cameos. Unfortunately for their republican sentiments, they also all bow to the ghost of Queen Marie-Antoinette, implying that they really did have monarchist sentiments all along and that Robespierre’s bloodhounds were right on the money with their accusations. (I mean, I’m just sayin’.)

There’s also some implicit misogyny, with Robespierre’s displays of fright and guilt being described as “womanly,” because only women get frightened of vengeful ghosts who are upset you decapitated them. Manly men like Danton would laugh it off. There’s actually a lot going on here and none of it is necessarily “good.”

The play was later novelized and the prose-version of the scene is under the cut. See for yourself!

Keep reading