nighs

i know “act your age” is a nebulous concept but when i click on your calarts-style cartoon character icon and onto your nigh unreadable pastel blog and i see the PAGES of you defending a dumbass comment you made with quivering pseudo-confusion and the fragility of a newborn lamb in a tornado, and then i go on your about and you’re a 23 year old in a six way polyamorous relationship working on your masters in cultural studies…..it’s time to consider. Why you are like this. you pay taxes ma’am. 

Imagine living in a city where there are no monuments, no buildings from before 1970, no proof that you had grandparents or parents, no history at all. Wouldn’t that make you feel like you were just a passing fad, that you could be blown away like leaves?… for any community to feel substantial and able to change without losing themselves, a history is absolutely crucial.
—  Emma Donoghue, talking about LGBT history and LGBT historical fiction

Breath of the Wild is still one of the most unique and gorgeous takes on a post-apocalyptic world in modern games, in my opinion. A lot of games with post-apocalyptic settings are very stark and colorless and alien and while those are interesting in their own right I still think that BotW’s take on it is just as fascinating and makes it stand out. 

Hyrule was utterly destroyed. No matter where you believe it lands on the Zelda timeline, it’s undeniable that it came thousands of years after well established kingdoms we’ve seen within games in the franchise, and that’s before we even discuss the Sheikah technology that predated this iteration of Link. We know that the wild and open Hyrule we have now is a far cry from the established kingdoms we’ve seen. People were killed. Civilizations were ravaged, destroyed, and left empty. Existing towns are small, scattered, and isolated by a violent wilderness full of monsters. Enormous mechs with land-altering properties and minds of their own threaten the livelihood of those remaining. There are fields littered with the remains of nigh-unkillable robots, and some of them still prowl the forests and mountains. At the very center of it all, the apocalypse-bringer itself is only barely restrained from releasing its absolute fury on what’s left as it continues to bring monsters back from the dead time and time again.

And yet… the world is still so alive in spite of all its struggles. The dust has settled, but instead of being dark and devoid of life, nature has crept over the ruins and roads. Wildlife thrives, birds sing, and plants grow, including the rarest flower thought to have been nearly extinct making a slow return. The sunrise and sunset are still beautiful, even if that light is cast mostly on empty, grassy fields as far as the eye can see. Wild horses frolic among the remains of guardians. Strange and beautiful spirits soar through the air or shine between the trees. Great fairies watch over towns. Even though the terrain is dangerous, people have made roads and paths for merchants and adventurers who connect the towns and villages. Monsters and guardians haven’t stopped them from exploring, scavenging, and pioneering the wild. Yes, the people know that the world is full of danger which threatens to engulf them- it’s hard to ignore that when Hyrule Castle is so visible- but that hasn’t stopped them from gathering the remains and making the most of it. It isn’t the shining kingdom it once was, but the people have a newfound appreciation and respect for the wilderness that now spans it. 

There’s just something so lovely and humbling about a setting which looks at the fallout of a magical kingdom and the new lives its people lead in the midst of a world that’s dangerous, seeing how they’re working on stringing themselves together again, and watching as they rekindle their hope… and all the while, the rest of the world keeps breathing. The sun still rises and the sun still sets.

Fill-a-Page February day 28!

Welp that coulda gone a bit better but overall I think it’s gross and cute enough to pass lmao. I hope this was worth all the effort that went into rigging the vote <3 

it’s only 10pm I CAN TOTALLY FIT IN ANOTHER SKETCH TODAY aha ha ha

just rick and morty things:

- when the episode bills itself as a self-contained, filler-style episode about atlantis but instead addresses the biggest and most compelling mysteries of the entire series, the citadel and evil morty

- when roiland, harmon and co face nigh insurmountable fan expectations for delivering on the narrative promises and payoffs associated with evil morty but yet pull it off and deliver in the most delicious way while setting up even higher stakes for the ultimate revelations to come

- when the FUCKING CALLBACK SONG COMES ON AND YOUR JAW DROPS AT THE ABSOLUTE MASTERY OF STORYTELLING AT WORK. like holy shit, all the 4? 5? narrative threads of this episode interweaving and aligning on one theme, each simultaneously playing up and subverting their respective narrative tropes in that familiar, delightful way this show does so well? that’s just a mastery of craft you don’t see very often, all building up to a final shot and final reveal that just satisfies. 

- when you know that it’s not “en vogue” to be this fucking enthusiastic about rick and morty anymore because some of the fans suck in a major way, but you don’t care?? because the show is still this goddamn excellent? fight me

10 Books to read this autumn & Halloween🍁🍂🍁

1.The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

It’s spooky,  it’s smart, thematic and has splashes of the otherworldly but it’s mostly a historical mystery

Originally posted by gertieparr

2. Tangleweed and Brine by Deirdre Sullivan

This is a collection of twelve fairytale retelling it’s Witchy, subversive and lyrical, it’s a bit dark but not to bad, it’s an ideal autumn read.

Originally posted by aningeniousuniverse

3. The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter by Theodora Goss 

This is a retelling inspired from the classic horror stories of: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Sherlock Holmes, Van Helsing, Dracula (Mr. Renfield,) Frankenstein, Rappaccini’s daughter, and Dr. Moreau.  it’s a very Interesting read if you love the Classics and a perfect read for Halloween.

Originally posted by myfinalwords

4. The Accident Season by Moïra Fowley-Doyle

This is a ideal book for reading and re-reading every autumn, Come October, seventeen-year-old Cara and her family – including her mother, older sister and ex-stepbrother – board up the windows and hide the sharp implements in preparation for the Accident Season, a month in which mysterious and dangerous things seem to constantly befall them. A spellbinding magical realism standalone, it’s full of tarot cards, masquerade balls, fortune-telling, dreams, hallucinations and hazy, stylish prose. If you’re looking for an atmospheric autumnal read, this is absolutely the book to go for. 

Originally posted by night-young


5.Harry potter by jk Rowling

Let’s face it you can’t have Halloween with out harry potter, with it’s wizards and witch’s, it’s magic spells and potions, it’s monsters and just overall feeling of autumn in this series it’s a must read.

Originally posted by gorunwithsissors


6. Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens

The Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries are one of those series you know is relatively recent but which seems like it’s been around for ages. It has that classic but accessible touch which makes it appealing to kids and brings something older readers or adults can appreciate, too. 

Originally posted by xbunnyclawsx

7. All the Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater.

Here is a thing everyone wants:
a miracle; here is a thing everyone fears:
what it takes to get one.Enchanting writing and complex characters interwoven into a tale of love, darkness, fear and redemption.

Originally posted by ullathynell

8. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Why so perfect for fall? The emphasis on education makes this feel especially appropriate to read during back-to-school season.
This turn of the century coming-of-age story is an American classic for good reason. The beautifully crafted tale pulls you into Francie’s story and has you rooting for her as she grows up in challenging circumstances. There is an undercurrent of hope that buoys everything

Originally posted by spacefairytales


9. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

One of Agatha Christie most famous mysteries, the eerie setting, and countdown of survivors makes for a satisfying mystery with a slightly Halloween-inspired feel. Add in the narrative following the children’s verse, and the disappearing soldiers mimicking the fallen guests and there is a decided sense of menace to the text.

Originally posted by myfavoritecartoons


10. The Halloween Tree by Ray Bradbury

This is a fast-moving, eerie…tale set on Halloween nigh. Eight costumed boys running to meet their friend Pipkin at the haunted house outside town encounter instead the huge and cadaverous Mr. Moundshroud. As Pipkin scrambles to join them, he is swept away by a dark Something, and Moundshroud leads the boys on the tail of adventures. This book is actually for kids but I read it last year at the age of 18 and I loved it and learned a lot about Halloweens history.
(Also I loved the movie as a kid)

Originally posted by kyecheng


Bonus

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

It’s an ideal choice when you’re looking for something to read while curled up under a blanket, sipping a hot drink. From the famous opening line to the dramatic conclusion, Rebecca is also perfect for a discussion title, if you’re looking for one for your book club to read this fall. The atmospheric novel is a modern classic, blending Gothic romance and mystery.