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YouTube Videoları Yapay zekaya sahip robotların HOCASI oldu!!!

YouTube Videoları Yapay zekaya sahip robotların HOCASI oldu!!!

“Derin öğrenme” adı verilen bir yapay zekaya sahip olan robot, video, ses ve fotoğrafları inceleyerek yapması gerekenleri kendi kendine öğreniyor.

ABD merkezli Maryland Üniversitesi ve Avustralya merkezli NICTA, yapması gereken şeyleri kendi kendine öğrenen bir robot geliştirdiklerini duyudur.

Araştırma ekibi tarafından “Derin öğrenme” adı verilen bir yapay zekaya sahip olduğu açıklanan robot,…

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NICTA launches K50,000 scholarships for girls in ICT

NICTA launches K50,000 scholarships for girls in ICT

ICT Minister, Jimmy Miringtoro

Papua New Guinea’s National Information and Communication Technology Authority (NICTA) has taken the initiative to promote “Girls in ICT” a step further by introducing a K50,000 scholarship which will be rolled out early next year.

The scholarship was launched yesterday to celebrate the Girls in ICT Day (April 24) by Communications Minister, Jimmy Miringtoro with…

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Security and privacy

Today I watched a streamed view of the ‘Cyber crime defence and privacy [PDF]’ panel hosted by NICTA Networks Research Group and UNSW CSE.  The panelists included Vijay Varadharajan, Gene Tsudik, Tim Strayer, Richard Bergman, Malcolm Crompon and David Vaile.  Eminent dudes all of them - ask Google.  

The discussion covered much ground, from the usual concerns about Privacy in a world of ubiquitous surveillance, to the uncertain future of the Do Not Track debate.  

My highlights of the day:

I appreciated Malcolm Crompton’s summary of where we are at with Privacy legislation at the moment:  very process oriented rather than outcomes oriented. The focus must shift towards Prevention, Detection and Response mechanisms.  

I agree wholeheartedly, and so does the professional privacy community, judging by the fact that the new IAPP qualification of Certified Privacy Manager (CIPM) is very focussed on this paradigm.

He believes (as do many others) that de-identification is technically no longer possible, but that a combination of law (policy) and technology may contain the problem.  Perhaps… but we are largely in new territory here, and we’ll need all the tools we can muster to contain this beast (law, technology, ethics, business rules, enforcement, detection mechanisms, self-preservation… the list goes on). 

David Vaile made the point that Trust in the online space is radically in question.  Nobody who has heard about the NSA revelations can deny this.  

I think this lack of trust currently aimed at governments, is inflicting  significant collateral damage onto commercial entities.  They should continue to address this trust issue openly, rather than pretend it’s not affecting them.

Gene Tsudik’s self-described 'rant’ identified (I think correctly) that the surveillance we endure online is not that dissimilar to the surveillance we endure in the analogue world (this might surprise some who do not think we are surveilled offline).  That said, many would contend that there is a difference (digital records are easier to store, manipulate, duplicate, disseminate, aggregate, analyse).  He also described personal genomics and The Cloud as the privacy nightmares of tomorrow, hinting at floating data centres (presumably in international waters) of no fixed jurisdiction as being in the works.

While Gene Tsudik decried the inadequacy of the static nature of laws versus the dynamic nature of technology, Malcolm Crompton defended the law’s static nature as its core benefit, providing stability. 

A couple of other items came up:  

Most of us know that attempts to create standards around Do Not Track failed in the recent W3C process.  

Malcolm Crompton made mention of the 4A’s framework for privacy program management (Analysis, Authority, Accountability and Appraisal) - another one familiar to anyone who has studied for the CIPM certification, or worked in Privacy.

This loose romp through the security and privacy jungle was well worth suffering through the poor online stream format. It was a bit like watching a live stream of a lunchtime lecture at the Harvard Berkmann Centre for the Internet and Society, which are equally clunky but intellectually satisfying.  Even if the newly re-badged UNSW Cyber Law and Policy Community would appreciate that comparison, I would still recommend attending these events in person in future.

YOUNG Australians are so afraid of being labelled geeks that we are losing our best IT talent and falling behind the world when it comes to technological innovation.

Reading the comments on this article, the author and experts quoted need to do further research on what the real reason is for the decline in the study of ICT in Australian schools. The premise is that people go on to further education to get hired in qualified jobs.

Not since the recession in the UK have I encountered as much difficulty in finding a job in IT. I spent 6 months out of work, having been replaced by a 457er in March. Other developers in my team who were let go at the same time are still unemployed.

Last month I moved over to NZ for a new role. It’s going well so far and the company is small enough to focus on quality rather than cheap labour. I’m fortunate to have the flexibility to up-sticks and move to a country where they still value my 10 years of international experience. Here’s to another ‘working-holiday’. Not everyone has this option.

And I’m not sure how I’ll get back to work in Australia if this trend of companies working with “out-sourcing partners” continues.

N.B. One of the on-trend t-shirts sold by Topshop this summer was emblazoned with the word “GEEK”. By it’s popularity in many a Facebook photo, kids today are not the ones steering away from an 'image’ problem.

Research for unhackable UAVs could be used for BYOD: NICTA

Summary: The research that NICTA is currently undertaking to secure UAVs from hacking could be some day used to solve the problems of employees bringing their own devices to work.

The National ICT Australia (NICTA) research that aims to protect unmanned…

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DigicelPNG Signs New License Agreement

DigicelPNG became the first telecommunications company in the country to migrate its license agreement to the National Information and Communication Technology Authority Act 2009 (NICTA Act). NICTA CEO Charles Punaha congratulated Digicel during the signing of the new Spectrum User Agreement (SUA).

In other news, the Digicel Recruitment Open Day will be held on the 11th of February and are inviting young, vibrant, energetic and enthusiastic individuals to the event. At the moment they are recruiting in:

  1. Customer Care Executives;
  2. Marketing and Retail Agents, and;
  3. Feet on Street Sales Representatives.

The event will be held at the Digicel Head Office at Gordons from 10am to 1pm and interested persons are asked to bring a letter of application, an updated CV, References and reliable contact numbers.

Big Data is seen as the holy grail of consumer insight

Data scientist Rami Mukhtar created the Big Data research group at the Government’s top ICT research centre, NICTA. It was his two year … more

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@cloudfeednet

Big Data is seen as the holy grail of consumer insight

Data scientist Rami Mukhtar created the Big Data research group at the Government’s top ICT research centre, NICTA. It was his two year … more

.

@cloudfeednet