Okay so I guess I got the delivery dates wrong or something, because ALL THREE BOOKS ARRIVED TODAY!

The mail deliverer went upstairs to leave I Am Spock for me in person, which was why I thought the other ones hadn’t arrived yet, but they were actually in my downstairs mailbox.

Anyway, I’m super excited to read I Am Spock, Beyond Uhura, and The Travel Guide to Vulcan! 😍👏💖🖖💫


When I was young, my dad always let me listen to comedy albums. I always knew about comedy, I always loved comedy.The day that I saw Whoopi Goldberg on television, I cried so hard, because I kept looking at my daddy going, ‘Oh my god. there’s somebody on TV that looks like me! She looks like me! Yay! I can be on TV! I can be on TV! I can do it! Look at her look at her! she looks just like me.‘”


‘Star Trek’ Actress Nichelle Nichols Suffers Stroke

“Nichelle Nichols, who starred in the original Star Trek TV series back in the 1960s, has suffered a stroke.

According to a statement on her official Facebook, Nichols suffered the “mild stroke” Wednesday night at her home in L.A. “She is currently undergoing testing to determine how severe the stroke was. Please keep her in your thoughts,” her rep said…”

Keep reading at hollywoodreporter


So I’ve been overwhelmed by the black panther comicon appearance and I’ve been dwelling on how revolutionary the black panther movie is going to be, what it’s going to mean to countless people when this movie comes out and how long we still have to go, So I decided to put this short photoset together to illustrate exactly how big of a deal it is and how it is bigger than one person.

it’s so bittersweet because when I was younger (especially growing up where I did, a black kid in Finland) I really wished I had more access to imagery and media that reflected who I was because it would have made my life radically different for the better and I wouldn’t be at 26 (STILL) doing damage control but on the flipside, I’m so in awe of all of the beautiful talent in 2016 that younger black kids are able to see and be inspired by.

I think I was like 4 years old when I conciously picked up race and color via watching Disney’s “Aladdin” and I noticed how Jafar, the evil royal guards etc the villains were more ethnic looking or a shade darker than the “good” characters.

it’s insidious because you’re seeing something but at age 4, you don’t have the comprehension skill or knowledge to break it down and see it for what it is (Colorism, Societal bias against black people which is rooted in centuries of white supremacist doctrine, society associates things that are dark/darker colors with evil, danger, ugliness, dirt etc) and reject it.

so you pick it up and see it on a surface level and you think to yourself “well darker must mean ugly, criminal and less human”…then what happens when you look at yourself in the mirror and find out that you are black?

  how is that going to impact how you see yourself?

and guess what? if a 4 year old black kid can pick that up and internalize that about him/her/themselves….then a white kid can sponge up the same language and imagery that dehumanizes black people too (subconciously/conciously)…what happens when when these people grow up? become teachers, doctors, law enforcement etc? what kind of impact is that going to have?

I’m going off on a tangent and that’s just one personal example but society does that on a global grand scale and it is largely unchecked.

but honestly though,look at the photoset and think about how many talented people out there that we love and respect….who would NOT have achieved the things they did if it wasn’t for another person before them inspiring them to reach their goals and acting as trail blazers when it seemed as though it was impossible….then think about the flipside and how many people, with all the potential in the world, never lived to become great because they were met with more images dehumanizing them than ones uplifting them…this is why the fight for HONEST representation is important and it continues.

argh, I didn’t plan on typing anything but I got in my feelings after watching this again

…anyway, here are some pictures to make you smile, the next gen gives me hope

and if none of that gets you going, here is a video of Michael Jackson surprising James Brown on stage and then thanking him for being his biggest influence (BET awards, 2003)

Nichelle Nichols inspires Whoopi Goldberg to become an actress because she was the first black woman Whoopi’d ever seen on tv that wasn’t playing a maid.

Whoopi gets her career launched by starring in The Color Purple.

Lupita Nyong'o was inspired to become an actress after watching The Color Purple because she was finally watching a film with people who looked like her.

So just to be clear, An African communications officer (who Nichelle never would’ve played if not for MLKJ encouraging her about representation) inspired the lead actress in the best black film of all time (which was based off a book written by a black womanist) where the women carried the weight of the film, which led to an African actress to get the role in a high profile film, directed, written by and starring black folk before even graduating school and now has the most nominations I’ve ever seen from someone so inexperienced.

But by all means, keep making racist powerpoints about how representation has no affect on anyone just because you don’t see color.


We just discovered that Nichelle Nichols, aka Star Trek’s Lieutenant Uhura and one of the most awesome people around, now has her very own Barbie! The Uhura Star Trek doll was recently released as part of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Star Trek franchise.

Barbie Uhura is dressed in her original red Federation uniform and comes with a communicator, which she can hold her hand, and a tricorder with a shoulder strap.

And we can all order her here.

[via D.A. Królak]