ngc-6888

NGC 6888, also known as the Crescent Nebula, is a cosmic bubble about 25 light-years across, blown by winds from its central, bright, massive star. This colorful portrait of the nebula uses narrow band image data to show emissions from sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in the wind-blown nebula in red, green and blue hues. The star is shedding its outer envelope in a strong stellar wind, ejecting the equivalent of the Sun’s mass every 10,000 years.

(Image Credit: J-P Metsävainio)

The Crescent Nebula: NGC 6888

NGC 6888, or the Crescent Nebula, is a cloud of material emitted by a bright star at its center located about 4,700 light years away towards the constellation Cygnus. It is about 25 light years away and possibly began to form around 250,000 years ago.

At the center lies WR 136, a massive Wolf-Rayet star that emits an equivalent of the Sun’s mass every 10,000 years. It also is the source of a strong stellar wind, which slams into the previously emitted surrounding material and forms the dense shell shape of the nebula. The star is burning through its fuel at a high rate, and will likely erupt in a supernova in several million years.

Image from NASA, information from NASA.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2016 June 10 

NGC 6888: The Crescent Nebula 

NGC 6888, also known as the Crescent Nebula, is a cosmic bubble about 25 light-years across, blown by winds from its central, bright, massive star. This sharp telescopic portrait uses narrow band image data that isolates light from hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the wind-blown nebula. The oxygen atoms produce the blue-green hue that seems to enshroud the detailed folds and filaments.

Visible within the nebula, NGC 6888’s central star is classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR 136). The star is shedding its outer envelope in a strong stellar wind, ejecting the equivalent of the Sun’s mass every 10,000 years. The nebula’s complex structures are likely the result of this strong wind interacting with material ejected in an earlier phase. Burning fuel at a prodigious rate and near the end of its stellar life this star should ultimately go out with a bang in a spectacular supernova explosion. Found in the nebula rich constellation Cygnus, NGC 6888 is about 5,000 light-years away.

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NGC 6888 In Varying Palettes

The Crescent Nebula in CFHT, HST, Synthetic RGB, Hubble pal. variation, and “modified” HST filters. (Images captioned)

Image processing by Craig & Tammy Temple

The Crescent Nebula is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, about 5000 light years away. It was discovered by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel in 1792.

It is formed by the fast stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR 136 (HD 192163) colliding with and energizing the slower moving wind ejected by the star when it became a red giant around 250,000 to 400,000 years ago. [**]

NGC 6888: The Crescent Nebula 

Image Credit & Copyright: J-P Metsävainio (Astro Anarchy)

Explanation: NGC 6888, also known as the Crescent Nebula, is a cosmic bubble about 25 light-years across, blown by winds from its central, bright, massive star. This colorful portrait of the nebula uses narrow band image data combined in the Hubble palette. It shows emission from sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in the wind-blown nebula in red, green and blue hues. NGC 6888’s central star is classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR 136). The star is shedding its outer envelope in a strong stellar wind, ejecting the equivalent of the Sun’s mass every 10,000 years. The nebula’s complex structures are likely the result of this strong wind interacting with material ejected in an earlier phase. Burning fuel at a prodigious rate and near the end of its stellar life this star should ultimately go out with a bang in a spectacular supernova explosion. Found in the nebula rich constellation Cygnus, NGC 6888 is about 5,000 light-years away.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2015 January 13

The Soap Bubble Nebula

Adrift in the rich star fields of the constellation Cygnus, this lovely, symmetric nebula was only recognized a few years ago and does not yet appear in some astronomical catalogs. In fact, amateur astronomer Dave Jurasevich identified it as a nebula on 2008 July 6 in his images of the complex Cygnus region that included the Crescent Nebula (NGC 6888). He subsequently notified the International Astronomical Union. Only eleven days later the same object was independently identified by Mel Helm at Sierra Remote Observatories, imaged by Keith Quattrocchi and Helm, and also submitted to the IAU as a potentially unknown nebula. The nebula, appearing on the left of the featured image, is now known as the Soap Bubble Nebula. What is the newly recognized nebula? Most probably it is a planetary nebula, a final phase in the life of a sun-like star.

NGC 6888, also known as the Crescent Nebula, is a cosmic bubble about 25 light-years across, blown by winds from its central, bright, massive star. Near the center of this intriguing widefield view of interstellar gas clouds and rich star fields of the constellation Cygnus, NGC 6888 is about 5,000 light-years away.