nfl broadcaster

THE DIGITAL DISRUPTION OF LIVE SPORTS: A deep dive into the fall of TV’s most lucrative programming

(BII)
Live sports — traditional TV’s flagship bulwark against digital disruption — appears to be in trouble.

Viewership across major sports programming like the NFL and English Premier League has underwhelmed in the 2016-17 TV season. Meanwhile, subscriptions for pay-TV and, in turn, for sports networks like ESPN, are in free fall. 

The causes behind the decline of live sports viewership are varied and complex. In addition to cyclical issues at play, sports programming is falling prey to the wealth of new content produced by the rise of new media platforms.

And as more and more TV viewers cut the cord, live sports content itself is moving off the TV screen and onto other devices. Last year’s NFL broadcasts on Twitter were just the beginning of digital disruption in the live sports arena. In fact, Amazon, a far mightier force than Twitter, will host the same slate of games online next season. And similarly formidable tech companies — namely, Google and Facebook — are also setting their sights on live sports. Will broadcasters be able to thrive or even survive in this emerging environment?

In a new report, BI Intelligence takes a deep dive into the decline of live sports on TV. The report explains how digital disruption and shifting consumer habits are contributing to this decline, and profiles the promising new players in the space. In addition, it discusses emerging business models for the live sports industry, and what’s next for legacy broadcasters as they strive to adapt.

Here are some key takeaways from the report:

  • As cord-cutting continues to accelerate, it’s growing more difficult for live sports to resist the shift away from linear TV.
  • Meanwhile, the increasing cost of sports broadcast rights and, accordingly, the higher advertising rates for brands, is making the current live sports business model unsustainable. 
  • With the legacy live sports model in decline, social and digital video platforms are making large strides to acquire sports programming.
  • Broadcasters will likely be forced to relinquish a slice of the lucrative revenue pie generated by live sports content.

In full, the report:

  • Assesses the evolving live sports landscape.
  • Examines how ESPN’s business model is threatened by the decline of live sports.
  • Profiles the promising new players in the space. 
  • Looks at what’s next for legacy broadcasters.

To get your copy of this invaluable guide, choose one of these options:

  1. Subscribe to an ALL-ACCESS Membership with BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report AND over 100 other expertly researched deep-dive reports, subscriptions to all of our daily newsletters, and much more. >> START A MEMBERSHIP
  2. Purchase the report and download it immediately from our research store. >> BUY THE REPORT


More From Business Insider
THE DIGITAL DISRUPTION OF LIVE SPORTS: A deep dive into the fall of TV’s most lucrative programming

(BII)
Live sports — traditional TV’s flagship bulwark against digital disruption — appears to be in trouble.

Viewership across major sports programming like the NFL and English Premier League has underwhelmed in the 2016-17 TV season. Meanwhile, subscriptions for pay-TV and, in turn, for sports networks like ESPN, are in free fall. 

The causes behind the decline of live sports viewership are varied and complex. In addition to cyclical issues at play, sports programming is falling prey to the wealth of new content produced by the rise of new media platforms.

And as more and more TV viewers cut the cord, live sports content itself is moving off the TV screen and onto other devices. Last year’s NFL broadcasts on Twitter were just the beginning of digital disruption in the live sports arena. In fact, Amazon, a far mightier force than Twitter, will host the same slate of games online next season. And similarly formidable tech companies — namely, Google and Facebook — are also setting their sights on live sports. Will broadcasters be able to thrive or even survive in this emerging environment?

In a new report, BI Intelligence takes a deep dive into the decline of live sports on TV. The report explains how digital disruption and shifting consumer habits are contributing to this decline, and profiles the promising new players in the space. In addition, it discusses emerging business models for the live sports industry, and what’s next for legacy broadcasters as they strive to adapt.

Here are some key takeaways from the report:

  • As cord-cutting continues to accelerate, it’s growing more difficult for live sports to resist the shift away from linear TV.
  • Meanwhile, the increasing cost of sports broadcast rights and, accordingly, the higher advertising rates for brands, is making the current live sports business model unsustainable. 
  • With the legacy live sports model in decline, social and digital video platforms are making large strides to acquire sports programming.
  • Broadcasters will likely be forced to relinquish a slice of the lucrative revenue pie generated by live sports content.

In full, the report:

  • Assesses the evolving live sports landscape.
  • Examines how ESPN’s business model is threatened by the decline of live sports.
  • Profiles the promising new players in the space. 
  • Looks at what’s next for legacy broadcasters.

To get your copy of this invaluable guide, choose one of these options:

  1. Subscribe to an ALL-ACCESS Membership with BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report AND over 100 other expertly researched deep-dive reports, subscriptions to all of our daily newsletters, and much more. >> START A MEMBERSHIP
  2. Purchase the report and download it immediately from our research store. >> BUY THE REPORT


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Tony Romo is reportedly joining CBS and replacing Phil Simms as its No. 1 analyst

(Ethan Miller/Getty Images for dcp)
It looks as if CBS will win the Tony Romo sweepstakes with an offer that was just too good to pass up.

According to Sports Business Journal, Romo will join CBS and be paired with Jim Nantz as part of the network’s No. 1 NFL broadcast crew. Romo will be replacing former New York Giants quarterback Phil Simms.

Adam Schefter of ESPN echoed the report, adding that an announcement was expected Tuesday.

It has long been accepted that Romo would become a network analyst once his playing days were over. So when it was reported Tuesday that Romo was going to retire from the Dallas Cowboys rather than extend his career with another team, speculation immediately turned to which network would land the budding television star.

Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network reports that part of the appeal of working with CBS for Romo, a scratch golfer, was that he could also be able to work as an analyst during the network’s golf coverage.

Schefter reports that Romo will not work as a golf analyst immediately, saying it could happen “down the line.” According to Schefter, Romo wants to “focus on football” for now.

One notable aspect of the decision to join CBS is that it primarily covers AFC games. That means there will be fewer opportunities for Romo to cover Cowboys games from the booth.

NOW WATCH: TERRY CREWS: Here’s how my NFL career helped and hurt me



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- LEGENDARY BROADCASTER PAT SUMMERALL DIES AT 82 -

Former NFL player Pat Summerall has died at the age of 82 after an illustrious career as an legendary NFL broadcaster, the Dallas Morning News reported on Tuesday. 

Summerall was the lead NFL announcer for CBS Sports and later FOX Sports for more than four decades, with color analyst John Madden as his primary partner. 

Summerall called his last NFL game in 2007 but still went on to work four Cotton Bowls. 

Before taking up a long career in the booth, Summerall was drafted by the Detroit Lions out of the University of Arkansas in 1952. He was best known as a player during his four years kicking for the New York Giants. He was a participant in “The Greatest Game Ever Played"—the classic 1958 NFL championship game loss to the Baltimore Colts. 

FCC votes to end NFL ‘blackout rule’

The Federal Communications Commission has eliminated the rule that authorized the NFL to restrict broadcasts of football games if the local venue is not sold out. Signaling the commission’s 5-0 vote earlier this month, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler wrote in an editorial, “Today we are blowing the whistle on an anti-fan practice.“ - The Hollywood Reporter

Follow the latest at Breaking News.

Photo: Empty seats are seen at the New York Giants’ first game at their new stadium, in 2010, via the Guardian (Credit: Getty Images)

Use of ‘Redskins’ on the Airwaves Is Down 42 Percent

According to data from CBS, Fox, NBC and ESPN, the R-word has been spoken by broadcasters during NFL games at least 605 times in the last ten weeks. Deadspin noted that after ten weeks into the 2013 season, the word was mentioned 1,040 times, which means its use is down 42 percent. Also, referenes to “Washington” are up 10 percent.

Hey FOX - Michael Sam is Gay. You can say it out loud.

I watched the 49ers drub the Cowboys today, which was a great pleasure for me, a lifelong Niners fan. There was one off note, though.

About a third of the way in, Joe Buck, the FOX play-by-play man, took a moment to acknowledge Michael Sam, standing on the sidelines of his first regular season NFL game.

Now, Michael Sam is openly gay. In fact, he’s one of the first openly gay players in American pro sports, and the first openly gay NFL player ever. So this was a pretty momentous day, even if Sam wasn’t suited up (he’s on the practice squad, so he wasn’t eligible to play).

But Buck, in a twenty or thirty second cutaway, did not mention Sam’s role in sports history, or his courage or anything that even came remotely close to describing why anyone should care about a rookie on the practice squad. Instead, he simply rattled off a few college and pre-season stats and a bit of his transaction history. The chyron underneath Sam didn’t read “NFL’s First Gay Player.” It read “SEC Co-Defensive Player of the Year.”

Seriously: they cut away to Michael Sam and discussed him for thirty seconds without even a single glancing allusion to him being important or special. The closest thing to an explanation for the cutaway was Buck highlighting the fact that (like every other player in the NFL) he was a star in college. I got the feeling that if Jackie Robinson was making his debut in 2014, the FOX broadcast team would tell us all about his bus ride in from Montreal.

The fact is: Michael Sam is a gay NFL player. That is what makes him important. He is a brave pioneer and a hero. Because he’s gay, and out, and in the NFL. That’s why he was the subject of a cut-away when he wasn’t even eligible to play in the game. They certainly didn’t cut away to any straight guys on the practice squad.

So why pretend otherwise? Why pretend that he’s just another football player? Why is the whole gosh-darned league doing that, repeatedly, every time a journalist asks them about it?

Because if you pretend he’s just another football player, you pretend that the fact that he’s gay isn’t important. You exonerate the league, you exonerate yourself, you exonerate everyone involved.

“He’s just another football player” essentially means “we were cool with it all along. Those silly gays were afraid of nothing.”

It’s like claiming you don’t see color. Even if you somehow become perfectly personally bias-free, the system is problematic. Improving, thanks to people like Michael Sam, but problematic.

To be clear: I don’t think Buck or FOX did this out of malice. I have no reason to believe he’s anything other than the decent guy he seems to be on-air. He even mentioned “having a chance to shake hands” with Sam before the game, which is something, I guess. I certainly would love to shake hands with Michael Sam. But it doesn’t have to be malicious. Absence of malice is not the right defense here.

Look: you have to believe there was a meeting about this. It didn’t happen by accident. Nothing this complicated and non-game-action-related in an NFL broadcast happens by accident.“ A producer said: "Michael Sam is too big of a story to ignore. We’ll cut away to him. But this is about football, not politics, so just talk numbers.”

The truth is: the Michael Sam story isn’t about stats. Sure, he’s a great football player, or he wouldn’t be in the NFL… but the Michael Sam story is simple.

Michael Sam is gay and out and he plays in the NFL.

I’ll repeat, in case you missed it.

Michael Sam is gay and out and he plays in the NFL.

So next time, maybe they’ll have the courage to say it out loud. Even if it bothers the bigots.

6

-KICKOFF COVERAGE’S: HISTORY OF THE 32 IN 32-

-GREEN BAY PACKERS-

1966

PACKERS GO 12-2 & CRUISE TO THE SUPER BOWL, CRUSH THE CHIEFS 35-10 TO WIN THE FIRST SUPER BOWL IN NFL HISTORY:

1966 would prove one of the most important years ever for both the Packers and the NFL as a whole. In 1959, Lamar Hunt and several others, frustrated at the league’s lack of interest in expansion, began a rival organization, the American Football League. The AFL was initially laughed at by the NFL, but by 1965 were a serious competitor and began engaging in bidding wars for top college players. This culminated in the New York Jets offering Alabama QB Joe Namath a then unheard of $400,000 contract. During the spring of 1966, NFL and AFL heads met and agreed to an eventual merger into one big league, but only when the latter was deemed up to parity. Until then, the champions of both leagues would meet on a neutral site in January to determine the ultimate champion.

The Packers meanwhile had one of the finest seasons in franchise history, finishing 12-2 and with Bart Starr being named league MVP. They met the Eastern Conference winner Dallas Cowboys in the Cotton Bowl for the NFL championship. This celebrated game saw the Packers win 34-27. The Packers went on to defeat the AFL's Kansas City Chiefs 35-10 in Super Bowl I at the LA Coliseum. Bart Starr was named the game’s MVP.

The First AFL-NFL World Championship Game in professiona lfootball, later known as Super Bowl I and referred to in some contemporary reports as the Supergame, was played on January 15, 1967 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles,California. The National Football League (NFL) champion Green Bay Packers defeated the American Football League (AFL) championKansas City Chiefs by the score of 35–10.

Coming into this game, considerable animosity remained between the AFL and NFL, thus the teams representing the two rival leagues (Kansas City and Green Bay, respectively) felt pressure to win. The Chiefs posted an 11–2–1 record during the 1966 AFL season, and defeated the Buffalo Bills, 31–7, in 1966 AFL Championship Game. The Packers finished the 1966 NFL season at 12–2, and defeated theDallas Cowboys, 34–27, in the 1966 NFL Championship Game. Still, many sports writers and fans believed any team in the older NFL was vastly superior to any club in the upstart AFL, so expected Green Bay would blow out Kansas City.

The first half of Super Bowl I was competitive, as the Chiefs out-gained the Packers in total yards, 181–164, to come within 14–10 at halftime. But Green Bay safety Willie Wood’s 50-yard interception return early in the third quarter sparked the Packers to score 21 unanswered points in the second half. Green Bay quarterback Bart Starr, who completed 16 of 23 passes for 250 yards and two touchdowns, with 1 interception, was named Super Bowl MVP.

It is the only Super Bowl to have been simulcast in the United States by two networks: NBC had the rights to nationally televise AFL games, while CBS held the rights to broadcast NFL games; both networks were allowed to televise the game. The first Super Bowl’s entertainment largely consisted of college bands, instead of featuring popular singers and musicians as in more recent Super Bowls.