newyorkcloseup

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“I kind of just steal the compositions, but I obliterate everything else. The details are gone. Nothing is stable. Everything is moving and dripping and messy.” —Diana Al-Hadid

Watch artist Diana Al-Hadid borrow from Old Master and Italian Renaissance paintings to create a singularly hybrid artwork—transforming brushstrokes on a wall into architectural sculpture—in a new film from the ART21 New York Close Up series.

WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid Plays the Classics

IMAGES (ROWS 1, 5): Diana Al-Hadid. Installation view of Ground and Figures at OHWOW Gallery, Los Angeles, 2015.

IMAGES (ROWS 2–4, 6): Artist Diana Al-Hadid in her studio, Bushwick, Brooklyn, NY, 2015.

ALL IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Diana Al-Hadid Plays the Classics. Artwork courtesy of the artist and OHWOW Gallery, Los Angeles. Photos © ART21, Inc. 2015.

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“The most freeing feeling is when I’m just moving the brush and making those strokes—when I’m completely lost in there. There’s that sense that I can express any kind of movement I want in there.”
—Artist Eddie Martinez on his approach to painting, in a film from the ART21 New York Close Up series

WATCH: Eddie Martinez Whistles While He Works

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Eddie Martinez Whistles While He Works. © ART21, Inc. 2012.

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“I loved how things behaved underwater. In the water, you can use those levitations to create different sculptures, in a way. It’s pretty spectacular.” —Alejandro Almanza Pereda

What brings an artist to leave New York City? In the latest film from the ART21 New York Close Up series, artist Alejandro Almanza Pereda decides to leave New York City for Mexico City, taking on one last project before having to vacate his Hunter College MFA studio.

WATCH: Alejandro Almanza Pereda Escapes from New York

IMAGES (ROWS 1–2): Alejandro Almanza Pereda. “Better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all,” video stills, 2014. Artwork courtesy of the artist. Featured in the ART21 New York Close Up film Alejandro Almanza Pereda Escapes from New York.

IMAGES (ROWS 3–4): Alejandro Almanza Pereda in his Hunter College studio, New York City, 2014. Production still from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Alejandro Almanza Pereda Escapes from New York. © ART21, Inc. 2015.

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“To be focused and dedicated to doing one simple thing can perhaps be the most transformative thing. That as narrow as it is, it can be infinitely deep.” —Louise Despont

New in the ART21 New York Close Up series: Artist louisedespont creates intricate pencil-on-paper drawings using architectural stencils in her home and studio in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.

WATCH: Louise Despont Draws Deep

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up episode, Louise Despont Draws Deep. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

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“There’s always a bit of that chemical mess at the edge…something that you crop off. I enjoy trying to make something out of the unwanted thing and go deeper into the disaster.” —Mariah Robertson

In a new film from the ART21 New York Close Up series, artist Mariah Robertson experiments with photographic chemistry in her Brooklyn darkroom, leading to a striking series of colorful cameraless abstractions.

WATCH: Mariah Robertson’s Chemical Reactions

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Mariah Robertson’s Chemical Reactions. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

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“There’s this mythology that you have to sacrifice everything to be a good mom. There was a lot of extra guilt for me, that I was choosing to take myself out of [my son] Gus’s daily life; then, also guilt that I really wanted to go back to my studio.” —Ruby Sky Stiler

Artists Ruby Sky Stiler and Daniel Gordon share their experiences (so far) of being working artists with a child in the latest film from the ART21 New York Close Up series.

WATCH: Daniel Gordon & Ruby Sky Stiler Take Baby Steps

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Daniel Gordon & Ruby Sky Stiler Take Baby Steps. © ART21, Inc. 2015.

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“Artists are some of the savviest, inventive people. They have to manage a really illogical pursuit. The rest of the world is a lot more logical. Every artist I know is dealing with a lot of stress, and a lot of desire, and a lot of curiosity.”
—Diana Al-Hadid

Before hosting the second film in Art21’s new Artist to Artist series, artist Diana Al-Hadid made her Art21 debut in August 2012 with a film from the New York Close Up series. The film, Diana Al-Hadid’s Studio Boom, featured the artist and her team at work in the artist’s Williamsburg studio producing the sculpture, Nolli’s Orders (2012), for its MASS MoCA debut.

WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Studio Boom

IMAGES (except top): Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Diana Al-Hadid’s Studio Boom. © Art21, Inc. 2012.

TOP IMAGE: Diana Al-Hadid, Nolli’s Orders, 2012. Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint; 264 x 228 x 122 inches. Installation view: Invisible Cities, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA. Courtesy the artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery. © Diana Al-Hadid.

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“My blackness—or the issues around that—has a strong effect on how my work is born and around the conversation that inevitably will happen. But I don’t think that it’s really the sum of all what my work is. Formally, I’m trying to approach art making in a way that is a part of the bigger history of art.” —Rashid Johnson

In the latest film from the ART21 New York Close Up series, artist Rashid Johnson charts a decade-long aesthetic and professional development from his early portrait photographs to his later conceptually-based sculptures made from glass, wood, and tile.

WATCH: Rashid Johnson Keeps His Cool

IMAGES: Work by Rashid Johnson installed in the International Pavilion at the 54th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy, 2011. Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Rashid Johnson Keeps His Cool. Artwork courtesy of the artist; David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles; and Hauser & Wirth, London, New York and Zurich. Photo © ART21, Inc. 2015.

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“We’re in the age of the remix. There’s no such thing as originality anymore. Now it’s just about how you use information around you to generate your individuality.”
—Jacolby Satterwhite

New film in New York Close Up: Artist Jacolby Satterwhite dances with himself—or, rather, his selves—transporting characters from his own 3D virtual worlds into the streets of New York City.

WATCH: Jacolby Satterwhite Dances with His Self

TOP IMAGES: Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Jacolby Satterwhite Dances with His Self. © Art21, Inc. 2013. BOTTOM IMAGE: Jacolby Satterwhite, Reifying Desire 3, video still, 2012. Artwork courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, New York.

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“It’s a fiction and a truth at the same time, and it was that transformation that really drew me to photography.”
—Daniel Gordon

New in New York Close Up: Artist Daniel Gordon is shown in his DUMBO studio photographing paper collages constructed from found images downloaded from the Web.

WATCH: Daniel Gordon Gets Physical

IMAGES: Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Daniel Gordon Gets Physical. © Art21, Inc. 2013.

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“I think of trash as a record of existence. They’re the archeological evidence of the present moment. History is permeating everything, whether you know it or not.” —Abigail DeVille

New in the ART21 New York Close Up series: Artist Abigail DeVille stalks the streets of Harlem with a trash-laden push cart, creating temporary sculptural interventions along the way.

WATCH: Abigail DeVille’s Harlem Stories

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Abigail DeVille’s Harlem Stories. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

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“I’m presenting my struggle—my own paranoia or neurosis…. It’s still from this totally personal, fallible point of view.” —Shana Moulton

In the 50th film from Art21’s New York Close Up series, artist Shana Moulton and composer Nick Hallett collaborate on the opera Whispering Pines 10—rehearsing and performing this one-act production at the New Museum as part of the Rhizome New Silent series.

WATCH: Shana Moulton & Nick Hallett Stage An Opera

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 New York Close Up episode, Shana Moulton & Nick Hallett Stage An Opera. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

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“I remember times in my high school when I felt really shy. If this is the alter ego to a shy side, then I really want them to look and sustain that vision. Being inside that display case, I could roll my structure right up to an audience member, and I had the license to do this in a way I would never have if I weren’t performing. Maybe for once, I get to be the bully.” —Bryan Zanisnik

New in the ART21 New York Close Up series, artist Bryan Zanisnik describes how he draws from family and personal history in creating a work, while also shown performing A Woman Waits For Me II (2014) with his parents at Pace University in Lower Manhattan.

WATCH: Bryan Zanisnik Keeps It in the Family

IMAGES: Artist Bryan Zanisnik performs in a display case on wheels for his performance A Woman Waits For Me II (2014) at Pace University, New York, 2014. Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up episode, Bryan Zanisnik Keeps It in the Family. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

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“Knowing when to stop, knowing when to say no…all these rules that aren’t written down for you, and you have to figure it out yourself through trial and error—and I’m learning as I go.” —Jacolby Satterwhite

New in Art21’s New York Close Up series: Artist Jacolby Satterwhite works down to the wire on his latest animation, Reifying Desire 6 (2014), leading into its premiere at the 2014 Whitney Biennial. The artist is shown at work at Recess, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

WATCH: Jacolby Satterwhite Is Going Public

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 New York Close Up episode, Jacolby Satterwhite Is Going Public. © Art21, Inc. 2014. Artwork courtesy OHWOW Gallery, Los Angeles and Mallorca Landings Gallery, Spain.

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“Constructing a space and telling a story became more interesting to me than what the actual object was.” —Abigail DeVille

The ART21 New York Close Up series introduces three new artists to the roster today: Louise Despont, Bryan Zanisnik, and, in a film premiering here today, Abigail DeVille.

In the film, DeVille constructs an interactive installation used as the set for a performance of Adrienne Kennedy’s play, She Talks to Beethoven (1989), at the JACK arts center in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn.

WATCH: Abigail DeVille’s Flair for the Dramatic

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up episode, Abigail DeVille’s Flair for the Dramatic. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

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“It’s not fully about the predicament of history. It’s about what you’re able to author yourself and how you’re able to form the future rather than living purely in the past.”
—Rashid Johnson

Kick off the first weekend of the new year with inspiration from artist Rashid Johnson, as featured in one of the first episodes from Art21’s New York Close Up series.

WATCH: Rashid Johnson Makes Things to Put Things On

IMAGES: Artist Rashid Johnson in his Williamsburg, Brooklyn studio, 2011. Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Rashid Johnson Makes Things to Put Things On. © Art21, Inc. 2011.

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“I’m not trying to denounce the visual past. It just seems impossible to me to be able to keep making the same image that I made six years ago.”
—Eddie Martinez

New film in New York Close Up: Greenpoint, Brooklyn-based artist Eddie Martinez discusses the motivation to shift his paintings from Pop-like figurations to pared down abstractions.

WATCH: Eddie Martinez’s Risky Business

IMAGES (except bottom): Eddie Martinez in his studio, Greenpoint, Brooklyn, 2012. Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Eddie Martinez’s Risky Business. © Art21, Inc. 2013.

IMAGE (bottom): Eddie Martinez, Matador #7 (Withdrawn), detail, 2013. Installation view at The Journal Gallery, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 2013. Production still from the New York Close Up film, Eddie Martinez’s Risky Business. © Art21, Inc. 2013.