newtowho

My #newtoWHO story

I first heard of Doctor Who when I took up an elective on Science Fiction Writing four years ago. A classmate just couldn’t shut up about it. To be honest, that classmate’s over-enthusiasm made me wary of the show. I avoided Doctor Who at all costs.

But one can’t always run away from one’s own destiny, and I was destined to be a Whovian after all.>

I found a friend through Tumblr who, for once, didn’t live in Narnia. We met up and she lent me her Doctor Who DVDs. She told me to just try watching the show (You’ll like it. You like sci-fi stuff, right?). I didn’t want to disappoint her, so watch the show I did.

The first episode I’ve ever watched is Rose; my first Doctor is Nine. After I saw the earth get swallowed by the sun 300 billion years into the future, the enormity of my smallness hit me. I thought, “THIS SHOW.”

I finished all her DVDs in a week and a half. After that, I was able to catch up with the series (Season 5). I’ve never since let go.Just recently, I’ve started watching Classic Who with another friend whom I’ve influenced into becoming a Doctor Who fan (yay!).

People in real life think I’m weirder now. No surprises there, since I’ve become the over-enthusiastic person I once regarded with suspicion. I have no regrets.

P.S. If you squint, you’ll see the ‘after WHO’ person is wearing a ‘The angels have the phone box’ shirt.  For the record, Blink is my favorite episode and I really do have that sentence printed on a t-shirt. X

Hullo, Doctor Who Tumblr here. So you’re #NewToWho and want to start watching the show, but you keep hearing people talk about numbered doctors and flying blue boxes and maybe it all seems just a bit confusing, especially since there’s over 50 years of episodes to consider! With all of time and space, every episode that’s ever happened or ever will, where do you start?

Well, don’t worry because we’re here to help;


See?

The first question you may be asking is “What is Doctor Who, exactly?” The show follows the story of the Doctor, an alien Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey who travels through all of time and space in the TARDIS, a time machine disguised as a big blue telephone box, saving the universe from enemies like the Daleks and the Ice Warriors. His current travel companion is Clara Oswald, though he has a long list of friends and companions who have shared journeys with him. Instead of dying, the Doctor is able to regenerate into a new body, taking on a new personality with each regeneration. Twelve actors, plus John Hurt, have played the Doctor thus far. Doctor Who celebrates change, creativity, and compassion, taking its viewers on adventures throughout the universe and teaching them the value of bravery and friendship.

Your next question may be “What is a Whovian? What qualifies me to be one?” A Whovian is a member of the Doctor Who fandom, simple as that. And, well, are you a Doctor Who fan and do you want to be a Whovian? Then good news, you already are one! That’s the great thing about Who, it doesn’t matter if you’ve watched for 50 years or 50 minutes as long as you’re excited about Doctor Who and other Doctor Who fans. We might be a little biased but we think the Doctor Who fandom is pretty great! Whovians produce original music, write fanfiction, make gifsets and edits, create amazing cosplays, and have so much enthusiasm towards the show that they love. Plus, it’s incredibly global! Even if you live on a tiny island somewhere in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, there’s bound to be at least one other Whovian there with you.

Keep reading

What being a whovian means

Since the doctor who tumblr started this whole #newtowho thing I though; why dont I just use my mind and it’s limited english vocabulary and try to express it in words.

Being a whovian doesnt just mean being part of a fandom.
As cheesy and corny as it may sounds, it means being part of one very big family scattered across the whole planet but still being one. Being fan of one thing which manages to unite thousands and millions.
Sharing laughs and tears and storys and arts and ideas. Just the simple concept of a simple idea. Inspiring each other and helping each other to keep going and to keep on doing what you do. Nobody judges you.

We all had our doctor. Our one and only first one. But even if some started with the very first and some with our lovely eleven. We all travelled. And that’s the thing.

Traveling but still finding a place where you belong to.

Where it just feels right being.

You may call it “home”.

BBC Doctor Who Blog - A Beginner’s Guide to the Doctors

As the Doctor himself said on Trenzalore, he’s had loads of bodies. That’s because the Doctor is a Time Lord, and Time Lords have the ability to regenerate their bodies when they’re worn out or dying. This means that his old body transforms into a new one, along with a new appearance and persona – a brand new Doctor! But underneath these surface changes, he’s still the same man, the same hero and adventurer.

The series finale gave us glimpses of many Doctors, including the very first - that was the white-haired figure that Clara spoke to at the beginning of the episode. We saw the ‘impossible girl’ interrupt him as he was about to steal a TARDIS, advising him to take the time machine that he still travels in today. The Second Doctor was the man wearing a big, furry coat and the Third was behind the wheel of his trusty old car, Bessie. It’s clear that every Doctor has a distinctive look – tall and handsome, short and impish, old, young… All different! But what’s more exciting is their unique personalities and eccentricities - you can read more by following the links below. You’ll see that the Doctor has always been a hero, but in different ways in different times.

The guide shows the Doctors - click on any of them and you’ll be taken to a page that gives you the low down on that particular Doctor. What they were like, who they travelled with and what caused them to regenerate. If you want to find out more, simply follow the links to their stories and you’ll discover some brilliant clips from their adventures, galleries, fact files and much more. We’ll be adding much more in the coming months, but for now, here’s a guide to the greatest hero of them all: The Doctor….

Read now: BBC Doctor Who Blog - A Beginner’s Guide to the Doctors

Doctor Who: A Guide to the Deep Cuts, an Introduction

There has been no other show or movie I’ve watched in my life that has captured my imagination in the way Doctor Who has. Not Star Trek, not The Real Ghostbusters, not even Star Wars has sucked me in this hard, and I used to run around my backyard with paper towel tubes and backpack pretending to bust ghosts. This show is like  believing in Santa Claus as kid, only once a week you get to see what he does with his off time. It even helped me find the love of my life (she used the old “Hey want to watch classic Doctor Who? I have every season on a 1 TB hard drive and I can go all night.” pickup line. Well, those may not have been her exact words but we’re getting married in a few weeks so there).

I have vague memories of seeing the classic series on PBS as a small kid but not really understanding it. I was also the older brother in my house so I didn’t actually catch the Doctor Who train until the 2005 series hit the SyFy channel. I was lucky enough to have a cousin fill me in on all the crazy details of the show and that 1 TB hard drive? Well we watched every episode, including the reconstructions.

So a bit of history for you first. Doctor Who is the longest running sci-fi TV series in the world. Starting in 1963 with veteran actor William Hartnell staring in the role of the Doctor. He was more well known for military roles and was reluctant to take the part initially. The show was created to fill the Saturday afternoon time slot between a sports broadcast and a pop music show. The executive that was head of Drama at the time was Sydney Newman, and he thought a science fiction drama would be a good fit. He wanted it to be educational though so he had the idea of the lead role to be a time traveling alien who would have no backstory. He would be traveling with his grand-daughter to all different periods in earths timeline. He wanted it to be exciting as well as educational. He also made a point to tell his new producer, Verity Lambert, there were to be no bug eyed monsters. Verity was given this skeleton of a concept and ran with it. With Sydney overseeing all production and casting decisions they created the show as we know it.

The shows first serial aired the day after President John F. Kennedy was killed. The show barely made a blip in its ratings, however, it was given a second chance the following weekend. The show was a hit, even though the Doctor was sort of grumpy and not particularly friendly at first. It was his first alien nemesis, the Daleks, that propelled the show and brought out his heroic side. Kids were freaked by the new monsters, adults were entertained by the action and a classic TV show was born.

Due to health issues Hartnell was no longer able to keep up with the demanding production schedule. It was decided that since The Doctor was an alien, he could change his form when close to death. This was a genius idea. Rather than just cast another actor who looked like him, it enabled the show to refresh itself without starting the story over completely. Fifty years later there have been 12 different actors playing the role, 13 if you count John Hurt in last years anniversary special. 

So the show ran for many years until in 1989 when it was canceled due to poor ratings and budget issues. The show was expensive to produce and was killed without a proper send off. The final episode aired in December of 1989 not to return again until 1996 with a TV movie. It was to act as a backdoor pilot for a new series picking up where the original left. Complete with the last Doctor regenerating into a much younger new Doctor, played by Paul McGann. Jointly produced by Fox and the BBC for both American and British audiences. Although it did well in the UK it wasn’t well received in the states, and the show was never picked up. It wasn’t until 2005 when the show was brought back in full force by the BBC with Christopher Eccleston playing the role. He was a bit edgier, a bit more modern, and most of all he was wearing a bad-ass leather jacket. This Doctor was still the same character but updated. This wasn’t a reboot, it was a re-awakening. Doctor Who was back and has been growing ever since. 

So for the next few weeks I will be writing a different post talking about each Doctor starting with William Hartnell all the way up to Matt Smith. Instead of writing about their classic well known episodes, however, I’ll be talking about some of the lesser known favorites. While everyone’s talked about The Dalek Invasion of Earth until they are blue in the face, no one has really brought up The Keys of Marinus. Which became almost a template for future stories of the show. 

So if you are just getting into the show by watching the new series or have watched all of the new stuff and want more but don’t know where to start, follow this series. I’ll go through each Doctors best episodes hopefully giving you a starting off point. If you’re as crazy about the show as I am then maybe try watching all of it. However, I don’t recommend it as not all of it is available on DVD or Netflix and you may have to use some less-than-legal ways to get the episodes. Not to mention most episodes from the early years and completely missing. A topic I will go over in the first post. Hopefully I can shed some light on the history of this wonderful TV show.

My dad grew up on Dr. Who. He fell in love with the fourth doctor. That man in the long long scarf! I remember growing up in watching all the classic episodes. Well, maybe not ALL of them. It was just the ones they showed in reruns! My brother and I love Doctor and all of us love watching it. My children are third generation Whovians. I am so thankful for The Doctor!

For me, to be a whovian is to believe that the impossible is possible.

Doctor who is the very first fandom that I joined (although I was like 9 so I didn’t understand the idea of fandoms back then) and even through puberty I never stopped watching and loving every second.

Being a whovian may separate me from most of my peers but also helps me find the rest of my peers who do and be able to connect with them through various other fandoms (but mostly Doctor Who).

It helps open up my imagination and let my mind wonder to the past, the present and the future. Being a whovian is my life and I’m so proud to be one.

(I’m also well prepared if that strange man with a big blue box happens to come along and say “Run!”, so you know, whatever’s best).

lingulus-deactivated20141029 asked:

What qualifies you to be a Whovian? I've been watching Doctor Who on Netflix for about three weeks and I love it, I'm at season 6 now.

Are you a Doctor Who fan and do you want to be a Whovian? Then congratulations you are a Whovian!

That’s the great thing about Who. It doesn’t matter whether you’ve watched for 50 years or 50 minutes, as long as you’re excited about Doctor Who and other Doctor Who fans.

Now lets talk about your favorite episode in Season 6 so far.

#NewtoWho

I have only been a Whovian for about a year. Matt was my first ‘Real Time’ regeneration and I stayed up till 4am to see Peter announced as the new Doctor. I watched all the 'NuWho’ in 2 weeks, before watching all the older Who’s in about a month. My bestfriend and I had a Pizza party at 5am during the 50th special which was my first 'Real Time’ episode.

I was always skeptical about watching Doctor Who, I knew bits and pieces about it, as anyone does. Ask anyone in the world what a Tardis or Dalek is and they will probably know. But it didn’t peak my interest, the concept didn’t scream out my name. So I never gave it a chance. My best friend was one of the biggest fans I knew. I remember about 4 years ago her coming to school with red and puffy eyes, and when I asked her what was wrong she told me it was because 'David Tennant had regenerated into Matt Smith last night’. I had no idea what she was going on about, but I just hugged her and smiled because I was a friend, secretly wondering why she was crying over a show (When I watched David regenerate into Matt I used an entire box of tissues and properly cried.) After years of nagging me, and making Doctor Who references I never understood, I agreed to watch 1 episode, 'Rose’.

She had always said to me 'Matt will be your Doctor I guarantee it, his personality as The Doctor is just so you’, I am studying to be an actor and she said he is brilliant. But she wouldn’t let me watch a Matt episode as my one, it had to be Rose because 'I want you to wonder what Matt is like so you have to keep watching.’ I did keep watching, I couldn’t stop watching, 3 days after I watched 'Rose’ I was still thinking about how amazing Christopher Ecceleston was, so I watched more, then David came and I couldn’t stop, I knew Matt was coming and I was excited. When Matt became the Doctor I knew he was mine, my friend was right, he was just me. When he said 'Nobody human has anything to say to me today’ I got chills, I had never gotten chills from a TV show before. I spent my days and nights thinking about Doctor Who, having Doctor Who sleepovers with my friend. I even got tally marks tattoed on my arm to represent the Silents. I also met Arthur Darvill on my 19th birthday and nearly died. I can honestly say this show has touched my heart, all the companions, all the Doctor’s from Hartnell to soon to be Capaldi have made me laugh and cry (especially Matt when he regenerated i was inconsolable and I now have a T-Shirt with his last line on it). It is truly an amazing show and everything I own has some small DW reference on it.

My friend always brags to me that I owe her for showing me the best thing in my life. 

My Adventure Begins

When i first saw Doctor Who, I was around 10 years old, and the doctor at the time was David Tennant. I was curious as to what the show was, because I saw my dad watching it. It looked interesting enough, and I thought the Doctor was quite ridiculous, fantastic, and a bit crazy at the same time. I instantly loved the show, and begged dad to record some more episodes for me while I was at school. Summer rolled around and all I would do is sit in front of the TV and watch the show, episode after episode, season after season, it’s the first show I started marathon-ing. (After that came Supernatural, then Sherlock, hence why I’m currently a Superwholockian)

Now I’m 17 years old, and Doctor Who and the fan base, the whovian community, it all really has been a life changer for me, and a fantastic resource of inspiration and support, I’ve met so many people that have become not only my friends, but my family as well. They’ve been there to help me through my depression, and some of the Doctor’s quotes have really been inspirational and I think this show was the game changer for me. Had I never run across this show, I sincerely think that I wouldn’t be here with all these amazing people. We really are the best fans in the world, and I hope we all continue to be amazing together.

I think if there was any advice I could give to incoming New Whovians, it would be brace yourselves. Because you’re going to love every single moment of this fantastic journey we’re on, and you’re gonna cry, we all do. But it’s so worth it in the end, because stories are sad sometimes, but the sad doesn’t cancel out the good, and vice versa.

Geronimo. :)

In honor of Doctor Who’s #newtowho week, I’m going to tell the story of how I got my mom and sister into Doctor Who.

My mom is a big British TV fan, so it was easy to convince her to start watching the show. She would come to my apartment every Saturday morning and watch a couple of episodes with my roommate and me. Sometimes, she would bring my sister (who was reluctant to watch, but I’ll get to that in a second). Pretty soon she was watching episodes on her own, but it wasn’t until the 50th anniversary special loomed that she knew she needed to catch up. She watched all of series 6 and 7 in a day and a half and was ready to watch the worldwide simulcast with us on November 23. She’s also responsible for the TARDIS mugs that my roommate, my boyfriend, and I cherish.

My sister was a little more difficult. Like I mentioned, she was reluctant to watch with us at my apartment, but in the fall she went back to school and was freed from watching if she chose not to. I got a frantic phone call from her about a week after she left.

“Sarah! I met a guy who is into Doctor Who!”

“Great!”

“He started talking about it, and I could only remember that first episode with Rose, and I managed! But if I run into him again, I won’t have anything to talk about! I have to watch the whole series now!”

She never ran into the guy again, but she made it all the way through Doctor Who anyway. Proudest Whovian moment.

My NewToWho experience

So I started watching doctor who when it first came back in 2005. This is mainly because my dad had been obsessed with the doctor when he was young and Tom Baker playing the mad man with a box, and we are British, so obviously we HAD to watch it. I was eight and we watched rose when it first came on. And I was hooked. At school everyone loved the show and it was just amazing talking about it with all my friends. It was also the ting my family did every Saturday, watch doctor who. It was amazing.

Then when David Tennant left, I stopped watching. I could make up excuses as to why but the reason is because I missed my doctor and I hated matt for taking him away. I only started watching again last year. And I have fallen in love all over again. Doctor who is the best that happened to me and I love it dearly.

You can start watching Doctor Who, at any point in its history. You don’t have to catch up with the rest of it. It’s a very simple myth. It’s a man that can travel anywhere in time and space in a box that’s bigger on the inside. That’s as much format as we have. You can join it at any time and absolutely get ahold of it. Dare I say it, I think it’s just one of the greatest pieces of entertainment that’s ever been. That’s why we latch onto it. It’s terrific! It’s simple to understand what it’s about, and it’s hugely entertaining. And every so often, it completely reinvents itself to feel like a whole new era. It always feels at home in the present day because it always adapts itself. We are, after all, on our 11th leading man.