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Here’s a compiled list of apps that is useful for school and everyday life. 

Note-taking

Paid apps:

  • Notability ($4.98 fav!)  
  • Goodnotes ($8.98 best for handwritten notes)
  • Noteshelf ($5.99)
  • Writepad ($7.99)

Free apps:

  • Evernote (fav!)
  • Keynote
  • Penultimate
  • Paper by 53
  • Bamboo Paper
  • Pages (iOS only)
  • Papyrus (Android only)
  • Google Drive
  • Microsoft Onenote
  • Simplenote
  • Somnote (100MB of free cloud storage for every account)
  • Catch Notes

Calendars

Paid apps:

  • Fantastical 2 for iPhone ($4.99)
  • Calendars 5 ($6.99)
  • Agenda Calendar 4 ($2.58)
  • Clear ($4.99 only for iOS)

Free apps:

  • CalenMob (fav!)
  • Cal 
  • Google Calendar
  • Sunrise Calendar
  • Tempo
  • Horizon Calendar
  • SolCalendar (Android only)
  • WAVE

Clock/ Time Tracker

  • Forest: Stay Focused, Stop Phubbing (fav fav fav fav fav)
  • Day Box (countdown app) 
  • ColorClock
  • Fiqlo ($1.28)
  • Rise ($1.99)
  • Timely Alarm Clock
  • My Alarm Clock Free
  • Alarmy
  • Wake Alarm Clock

To-Do Lists

Paid apps:

  • Carrot ($1.99)
  • Todoist ($30/yr)

Free apps:

  • Any.Do
  • Google Keep (Android only)
  • Wunderlist

Flashcards

Paid apps:

  • Flashcards Deluxe ($3.99)

Free apps:

  • Evernote Peek
  • AnkiApp
  • Flashcardlet
  • STUDYBLUE
  • Flashcards +
  • Flashcards+ by Chegg
  • Cram
  • Quizlet

Languages

Free apps:

  • Memrise (fav!)
  • Duolingo
  • AnkiApp
  • Busuu
  • Google Translate
  • Dictionary Online 

SATs

Paid apps:

  • SAT Vocab Challenge for iPhone ($5)
  • SAT Connect ($9.99 for Apple, marked down from $24.99 :O )
  • Adapster (math- $9.99 on Apple)
  • Kaplan Portable SAT ($5.99)

Free apps:

  • SAT Up (fav!)
  • The Official SAT Question of the Day (Collegeboard!)
  • SAT Prep & College Search
  • SAT Vocab by Mindsnacks
  • IntelliVocab lite
  • Princeton Review’s SAT Score Quest for iPad
  • Kaplan SAT Flashcubes (free)
  • Flash of Genius: SAT Vocab ($1 Android, free on Apple)
  • ACT/SAT Math Booster (Free, Android)
  • SAT Challenge By The Princeton Review
  • English Vocabulary Flashcards Exambusters

Study Guides

  • iTunesU 
  • CliffsNotes Study Guides
  • Khan Academy

Music

  • Spotify (fav!)
  • 8tracks
  • Soundcloud
  • Pandora
  • Google Play Music
  • Vevo
  • iHeartRadio
  • Tidal
  • Shazam
  • Garageband
  • Sound Trap
  • Songza
  • Rdio
  • Youtube

Videos

  • BrainPOP Featured Movie
  • VideoScience
  • Khan Academy
  • TED Talks
  • Youtube

News

  • Yahoo News Digest (fav!)
  • The New York Times
  • NYT Now
  • BBC
  • CNN
  • Al Jazeera English
  • Circa News
  • AP Mobile
  • Flipboard
  • Google Currents
  • Buzzfeed
  • Pocket: Save Articles and Videos to View Later
  • reddit AMA - Ask Me Anything
  • Digg

Books

  • iBooks
  • Scribd ($8.99/mo)
  • Kindle
  • Kobo
  • Google Play Books
  • Nook
  • Ebook Reader
  • Wattpad (contrary to popular opinions, there are many great books)

Relaxation/ Stress Relief

Workout:

  • Nike + Running (fav!)
  • Workout Trainer
  • Runtastic Six Pack Abs
  • FitStar
  • Runtastic Six Pack Abs
  • Johnson & Johnson Official 7 Minute Workout App

Random:

  • Earthlapse ($0.99)
  • Sing! Karaoke by Smule
  • Yoga Relax
  • iBonsai
  • Zen Bound
  • Sheep Counter
  • White Noise
  • Just Rain

Games to stimulate your mind:

  • 1010!
  • 2048
  • Tsum Tsum
  • Blek

I have not tried most of the paid apps, please download at your own discretion :)

3

June 1st 1921: Tulsa riot

On this day in 1921, the black district of Tulsa, Oklahoma, was destroyed by a white mob. The Greenwood district of Tulsa had one of the most affluent black communities in the United States at this time, earning the nickname ‘Black Wall Street’. On May 30th 1921, a young black man called Dick Rowland rode in an elevator with a white woman; false rumours swirled in the white community that Rowland had attempted to assault her. Rowland was arrested on May 31st, and sensationalist newsaper coverage of the incident fuelled talk of lynching. This led to a confrontation between white and black mobs outside the courthouse, which resulted in a gun being discharged, sparking violence. The following day, June 1st, the Greenwood District was looted and burned by white rioters. The governor declared martial law, and National Guard troops were called to quell the violence. Law enforcement officials imprisoned black Tulsans, with over 6,000 people held for days on end; most white rioters, in contrast, were not arrested. In the wake of the violence, 35 city blocks lay in ruins, thousands of African-Americans were left homeless, and over 800 people had been injured. The dead were buried in mass graves, with the toll initially placed at 36, but revised by a 2001 report which rose the estimation to 300 fatalities. This report, which recommended paying reparations to the survivors and victims’ families, was part of a concerted effort in recent years to end the silence about the event. The scale of the violence was covered up at the time, and the incident was omitted from state and national histories. The Tulsa riot was one of a number of attempted ‘racial cleansings’ by white mobs against black communities in the United States, which had the tacit support of law enforcement and government. It is vital that this event, which saw white mobs destroy an entire black neighborhood, is remembered and placed in the long narrative of systemic racism in the United States.