news history

7

Trump praises Andrew Jackson and wonders, “Why was there the Civil War?”

  • In an interview with the Washington Examiner’s Salena Zito, Trump praised former President Andrew Jackson — a slave owner whose actions led to the genocide of thousands of Native Americans in the “Trail of Tears” — and questioned why the Civil War was necessary.
  • There’s an easy answer: slavery. At the time Civil War broke out, southern states were in the process of breaking from the Union over their desire to protect their right to own slaves. 
  • What’s more, Jackson died in 1845, nearly 16 years before the Civil War broke out. Read more (5/1/17 10:30 AM)
bbc.com
Mexico revives 3,000-year-old ancient ball game - BBC News
A championship is being played in Mexico to try to revive a 3,000-year-old ball game.

VIDEO AT WEBSITE

The finals of a revived 3,000-year-old ball game have been played in the Mexican city of Teotihuacan

Organisers have been trying to bring back the game, known as Ullamaliztli in Mexico, because of its ancient cultural and religious significance.

The game was played across Central America before being banned by the Spanish conquistadors.

The tournament, only the second since 2006, is being played by ten teams from across Mexico.

According to ancient texts the ball game was seen as a struggle between light and darkness and provided the energy to keep humanity going.

One of the best preserved ball courts can be found - with stone rings to throw the ball through - in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula

Today the game is played by teams of seven players, who knock a heavy solid rubber ball up and down a narrow pitch, using their hips rather than their feet.

Giant ball courts can still be seen in ruins across the region.

In ancient times losers of the game were often sacrificed to the Gods*, but this year organisers opted for a knockout tournament instead.


* There is iconography and mythology related to the ballgame that involve sacrifice, but there is little evidence that people were sacrificed for having played this game.

4

Students have been studying slavery in the U.S. for decades, so how do we keep getting it so horribly wrong? Grappling with massive, institutionalized cruelty is no easy task, especially for kids, but we owe it to American students to tell them the truth. We’ll never be able to reckon with our shared national history if we insist on sugarcoating it. Read more

follow @the-movemnt

2

One of Trump’s top White House aides wears the same medal worn by Nazi collaborators

  • Sebastian Gorka, the deputy assistant to Trump has been wearing a medal associated with Hungarian Nazi collaborators.
  • On Sunday, LobeLog’s Eli Clifton noted several photographs from Trump’s inauguration showing Gorka wearing a medal. 
  • That medal, Clifton discovered, was originally issued by the Hungarian Order of Heroes, Vitézi Rend. 
  • The group was made up of elite supporters of the interwar regent of the Kingdom of Hungary, Miklós Horthy, who collaborated with Nazi Germany during World War II, according to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.
  • Gorka, who is of Hungarian descent, was a professor and Breitbart’s national security editor before joining Trump. A regular fixture on Fox News, he also has ties to the anti-Muslim right. (Talking Points Memo
  • He recently suggested (CNN) the Trump administration uses — and will continue to use — the term “fake news” to describe media outlets that are critical of the president. Read more (2/13/17 10:00 AM)

A letter from Joe Biden to his staff:

To My Wonderful Staff,
I would like to take a moment and make something clear to everyone. I do not expect, nor do I want, any of you to miss or sacrifice important family obligations for work. Family obligations include, but are not limited to, family birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, any religious ceremonies, such as first communions and bar mitzvahs, graduations, and times of need, such as an illness or a loss in the family. This is very important to me. In fact, I will go so far as to say that if I find out that you are working with me while missing important family responsibilities, it will disappoint me greatly. This has been an unwritten rule since my days in the Senate.
Thank you all for the hard work.
Sincerely, Joe

6

Marley Dias, the 12-year-old behind #1000BlackGirlBooks, is writing her own book!

  • In February 2016, Marley Dias, who was 11 at the time, launched the #1000BlackGirlBooks project, collecting books featuring black girls as the main character. 
  • Now, after collecting over 8,000 such books, Dias has decided to author a #BlackGirlBook of her own.
  • On Thursday, Scholastic announced that 12-year-old Dias had signed a deal with the publisher for a book due in Spring 2018. 
  • According to a press release, the book is a “keep-it-real guide” to helping kids and preteens make their dreams come true.
  • “Through her smarts and ingenuity, she’s delivered a jolt of inspiration that’s sent an unstoppable shock-wave to kids everywhere who’ve stood up with Marley to shout ‘Yes!’ to the power of positive action,” Scholastic’s vice president and executive editor Andrea Pinkney said.
  • “In this book, Marley will share her dynamic wisdom with readers everywhere.” Read more

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3

Researchers think they’ve rediscovered a long-lost “world wonder” that’s been missing for a century

  • Two researchers think they’ve rediscovered a long-lost world wonder.
  • In the mid-1800s, New Zealand’s “pink and white terraces” would attract any wealthy tourist who dared voyage weeks or months to see its vibrant, cascading craters of water that descended into a lake.
  • These terraces are thought to have been walls or “crusts” made from sediment built up from mineral springs and geyser deposits.
  • Tourists would dip into the warmer pools made from these walls — a sensation so pleasant that a prominent English novelist once wrote that he could “imagine nothing more delicious to the bather.”
  • They were often considered the “eighth natural wonder of the world” and yet were lost more than a century ago.
  • In 1886, a volcanic eruption from Mount Tarawera either concealed or the terraces (depending on who you ask). Though mankind had trekked from afar to see them for years, no one actually recorded their coordinates.
  • Researchers Rex Bunn and Sascha Nolden sifted through old notes about the terraces from before the volcanic eruption written by a German-Austrian geologist named Ferdinand von Hochstetter.
  • They have a hunch that the terraces are located about 32 to 49 feet below layers of mud and ash, thanks to those records, and are now advocating for a deep dig. Read more (6/14/17)
follow @the-future-now
2

Kathrine Switzer, first woman to officially run the Boston Marathon, is racing it this year

  • Women haven’t exactly crossed the finish line when it comes to gender equality, but we’ve certainly come a long way since Kathrine Switzer first hit the pavement at the Boston Marathon.
  • It was 1967 when Switzer, then a 20-year-old journalism student at Syracuse University, became the first woman to officially enter the historic marathon.
  • At the time, women were woefully marginalized in the world of athletics. 
  • According to CNN, Switzer had been training with the men’s cross-country team at Syracuse when she decided to enter the race, with little encouragement from her coach. 
  • In her memoir, Switzer recalled the Syracuse coach telling her the 26-mile marathon was too long for a “fragile woman.”
  • During the marathon in ‘67, race director Jock Semple chased Switzer down and ripped her bib off of her.
  • Now, after running 39 marathons, 70-year-old Switzer will run in this year’s Boston Marathon — wearing the same bib number an angry man tried to rip from her 50 years ago. Read more (4/17/17 11:26 AM)
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“Through contemporary eyes, the static shots and urban milieus of Black Girl seem to solidify Sembène’s filmmaking as an aesthetic neighbor to the emotionally-walloping neorealism of the Italian De Sica. Black Girl may not evoke the immediate adoration of something as universally beloved as De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, although the latter film’s deft interweaving of personal-is-political social commentary with the rueful, everyday messiness of the lives of the marginalized working class began a storytelling tradition that is gloriously carried on by Sembène. Black Girl has all the skillful stylistic simplicity of your typical piece of neorealism but also packs a sharper bite and it’s electrifying to watch Sembène craft a twisty drama with the piano-chord tautness of a thriller that is nonetheless coated in such a rare and wryly intimate form of humanity.”

Read more: OUSMANE SEMBÈNE’S BLACK GIRL IS ONE OF THE YEAR’S MOST IMPORTANT CINEMATIC EVENTS by Matthew Eng

buzzfeed.com
This Archeologist Is Clapping Back After B.C. Wrote First Nations Out Of Its History
“I want the government to rethink how they’re doing this."
By Lindsay Kneteman

An archeologist is using some crafty editing and a passion for First Nations rights to challenge the colonial history lining B.C.’s highways.

One of the examples of her work:

npr.org
California Restaurants Launch Nation's First Transgender Jobs Program
The unemployment rate for transgender people is double that of the general population. A new program aims to change that. It's all because of a trans woman who's employed trans people for years.