newby's

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18.08.17 📖✨
im a really bad news reader but other day i read this article that was really relatable so i picked out and categorise the main points, which is a lot more straightforward and time efficient when i need points in essay writing !!
♪ song reco:
vineyard , oohyo

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I mean really, a tradition is just born from doing a thing over and over again, right? :x

IMPORTANT!!!! So I know that I’m making comics about Breath of the Wild, but the truth is I actually still don’t know very much about the game, so as strange as this may sound please don’t talk about Breath of the Wild to me!

Click HERE to check out more Breath of the Wild comics!

Click HERE to view my schedule for the current month!

Wondering why there are two Links? Why their equipment isn’t exactly the best? Check out this post for an explanation!

Domestic Garden Witch: Orange You Glad You Saved That Peel?

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

I’ve Got a Peeling!

If you’re not the kind of witch I am (the kind that looks at a citrus peel and sees zest to be added to food), and you tend to juice fruits or occasionally cut open a lime for tequila, then chances are you frequently compost or toss the leftover rinds. This is an alternative to that, which is particularly useful for starting up your own herb garden.

Cut the ends off of your fruit (it can be any kind of thick-rind citrus, such as orange, grapefruit, lemon, or lime) in such a way as to flatten the ends without cutting into the flesh. Then cut the fruit in half and remove the flesh for juicing, eating, et cetera. If you then cut a small hole in the flattened end for drainage, you can proceed to fill the makeshift pot with soil, add a seed, and water.

Allow the seedling to grow until it is time to transplant. Then simply plant the whole thing in a garden. The rind will decompose, fertilizing your plant (an excellent source of nitrogen and additional nutrients) and avoiding waste.

How Can I Witch This?

The possibilities here are similar to many container gardens, but there’s a little extra fun that you can have with citrus rinds. Unlike terra cotta or ceramic, citrus peels can be carved. Adding runes and symbols are made easier because of this and if you carve them into the fruit and allow the fruit to heal a bit before using it, you can add additional time and intent to it.

Depending  upon the intent, you may also want to coordinate the type of fruit with the type of spell. For instance, orange peels can promote happiness, healing, and can add a solar association to the garden.

In Conclusion…

Though a simple project, it has a lot of potential in magic and also has a lot of potential in saving money and resources for the student witch. It saves space (something that is also helpful for the student witch), and is a green alternative to other seed starters. Because it is rich in nutrients, it also makes an ideal fertilizer when transplanted.

When getting your garden started, try enhancing your plants’ health and yield by planting the seeds in enchanted citrus peels!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O(

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New Studyblr! 

Hey there! I’m Elin, and I just decided to make a studyblr on my summer break (?!??!). Why you ask? 

So, I’m about to become an engineering student in two months. I haven’t studied for 3 years, thus I’m about to refresh my mind with a couple of summer courses in math and programming this summer.

I’m doing 600 pages of math in 50 days over the summer break, while working and having a life. I hope having a studyblr will help me stay productive! 

I really like following all the studyblr and I’m looking forward to be apart of the community! Hope you’d like to follow me during my upcoming 5 years of studies. I hope you have a great day! :) 

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You bet your butt if there’s a command that’s anything close to “pet” I will press it as many times as possible

IMPORTANT!!!! So I know that I’m making comics about Breath of the Wild, but the truth is I actually still don’t know very much about the game, so as strange as this may sound please don’t talk about Breath of the Wild to me!

Click HERE to check out more Breath of the Wild comics!

Click HERE to view my schedule for the current month!

Wondering why there are two Links? Why their equipment isn’t exactly the best? Check out this post for an explanation!

(accurate) falsettos soundtrack

ACT ONE:

1. Whose Mother Let That Child Swear

2. Call Me Daddy/My Ex-Husband Sucks (Dick)

3. It’s Karate, Kid: The Musical

4. Mendel’s a Bad Psychiatrist 

5. My Father Sucks (Dick)/My Parents Think I’m Crazy

6. Cook Your Own Damn Dinner 

7. This is What Happens When You Go to a Bad Psychiatrist

8. Chicken Marengo/Jason’s A Slightly Better Psychiatrist But Not Really

9. Mendel’s A Furry/Why Are You Calling Him Daddy Now?

10. F*ck the Patriarchy/Welcome to Duloc/The Patriarchy’s All I Have

11. Whizzer Wins but he actually doesn’t

12. Better Homes and Gardens

13. He Drinks Tea in the Bathtub?

14. Send A Wedding Invite to Your Ex-Husband! Genius!

15. “I Hate the World!” “He Hates Everything!”

16. Someone Pays Some Attention to Jason for Once

ACT TWO:

1. Exposition/Marvin’s A Big Boy Now

2. Puberty!

3. Puberty! (Reprise)

4. Cubs Win the World Series (2016)

5. #TonyBoney

6. Mendel Never Read the Torah

7. The Naked in Bed Song

8. Spoiler Alert: It’s Called AIDS/Whizzer Be Trippin’

9. Yes, SJB, You Go

10. They All Lie Minus Jason

11. That Random One That Shows Up on Shuffle Every Time I Turn On Spotify

12. Gay: The Musical

13. The True Meaning of Bar Mitzvah

14. Oops, Marvin Probably Has AIDS Too, But That’s Never Explicitly Said

15. SYMBOLISM (Tango W/ Death)

16. Whizzer Dies

17. KYS, William Finn

The Domestic Garden Witch: Making Pets Happy

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Gardening for Your Familiar

This past weekend, I went to one of my coven sisters’ place to run a game of Dungeons and Dragons. This in itself isn’t that unusual - I usually play about a game a week, and every other week is held at her place. However, she is definitely a witch who spends plenty of time both in the garden and in the kitchen! A fellow animal lover, with three cats and a couple of dogs, it’s always enjoyable to visit. What surprised me, though was an addition to her home’s normal features: a little garden close to the ground meant for her cats!

Whether a college witch or a witch who’d been practicing for a long time, it’s fair to say that many of us - dare I say that perhaps most of us - have dogs, cats, or some other kind of pet. And while there are plenty of spells out there for familiars and pets, it’s rare that I see spells focusing on gardens for them. So of course, my sister’s garden is featured this week, because it is absolutely brilliant!

A simple project, done in the same way you would any container garden, consider growing plants that your furry friends can safely consume. Where the magic comes in is the intent with which you grow your plants and with which you pot them. The example above makes use of cat grass, catnip, mint (which the kitties love to rub up against), cilantro, and parsley.

But let’s take it a step further, as there are plenty of other animals out there!

Aquatic Gardens: Just like with terrestrial pets and plants, live plants can be added to an aquarium with care. Not only do they breathe new life into your fishes’ home, but they help oxygenate the water and depending on the species of plant and fish in the environment, could provide a food source. Sometimes the plant itself is the pet, as in the case of marimo moss balls!

Terrarium Gardens: In the past, I’ve mentioned bottled gardens and terrarium gardens. Whether reptile or amphibian, plants can help provide a more natural surface for climbing, can provide a food source for herbivorous friends, and - as before - help bring more life to the terrarium!

Formicarium Gardens?: Admittedly, not everyone has a colony of ants as a domestic pet. But as with any animal, ants require care and maintenance, and a proper formicarium usually has a larger area for foraging. Though the ants will be healthy with a steady supply of feeder insects and sugars, adding plants will not only make the “outworld” a more aesthetically pleasing environment, but a more diverse one for the colony as well. In addition, ants have been known to tend to plants, harvesting sap and nectars while also keeping the plant nourished and maintained. Take it a step further by adding pitcher plants - a plant that could easily be a pet itself - which not only help control the colony population, but also promote a mutual relationship with ants (the plant offers nectar to the ants from its inactive pitchers, and while it does “eat” ants, the ants will still take care of the pitcher for the sake of the nectar).

Bringing it Outside: Some of us count horses and other outdoor animals as pets. The same principle applies - set aside a box garden specifically to help nourish your friends and bring some joy to the stable. Similarly, if you don’t have any pets, you could set up a garden to encourage wildlife. It’s not uncommon to see beautiful flower gardens for hummingbirds, fruit trees and berry bushes to encourage wild birds to visit, and gardens set off to the side specifically for deer.

What This Brings to a Witch

Part of being a witch or of being pagan is nurturing a relationship with nature. There are many ways of doing this, from adopting an organic lifestyle to assisting in conservation efforts, to even learning how to forage and to recognize various plants. But it goes without saying that pets, plants, and animals can all do much to help us learn about our role in the world. They teach us how to be ourselves, how to live in the moment. Even the ants in a formicarium can teach us about how to naturally be efficient and productive.

This in itself is magical. It’s a natural spell that is meant to enliven the spirit and while it does do quite a bit to make the animals in our lives happy and healthy (even more so when planted and grown with intent), it also turns around and gives us the very same blessing.

Grow your garden, and tend to it and your animal friends with love, and they will teach you far more than you may realize!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O( 

Domestic Garden Witch: Shrines in the Garden

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

A Practice As Old As Time

In previous Domestic Garden Witch articles, I’ve covered setting up altars and arranging gardens so as to be living altars. As witches, we are often looking for ways in which we can reconnect with nature and find harmony with its ebb and flow. For as long as mankind has been around trees, it seems as though these impressive and beautiful plants have inspired and drawn us closer to the divine.

Nearly every culture has something to say when it comes to trees - their growth patterns, their spiritual significance, and even the varying properties of their constituent parts. Roots, leaves, branches, seeds or fruit, and wood… all have a part to play in many religions. This is particularly true for modern druidic practice, which draws from Celtic lore and centers around the magic in certain woods. And as can be seen from my current Runic Friday series on the Ogham, certain woods were prominent enough in Celtic lore to inspire a form of divination symbolized by Irish Celtic writing.

There are many ways in which we can bring the magic of trees into our lives, but when it comes to garden magic, I have yet to see a method so endearing as building shrines on or near them.

Simple or Complex, Religious or Spiritual

Shrines are most often associated with religion - especially religions such as Hindu, Shinto, and Buddhism. In short, a shrine is a type of altar which is usually dedicated to a specific god, spirit, or ancestor as opposed to being devoted to whole pantheons. Depending on the practice, these shrines can be ornate or very simple.

But shrines aren’t limited to religion or ancestor worship. Like altars, they can be places of meditation or magical working, and therefore can have a place in spirituality regardless of the faith practiced.

Tree shrines are a great way of integrating your practice with your garden, providing a place to meditate or work magic, or to honor deities. As an added benefit, they can be used to honor the spirit within the tree if desired. For those on a budget, the shrine need not be overly fancy - a small altar made of stone or wood at the base of the tree is sufficient. But if fancier shrines are more your style, inspiration can be drawn from real world shrines, which are often built into the hollows of trees or carved into them. Here, offerings can be made or deities worshipped as you see fit.

Consider the role the tree plays in your garden, and build your shrine with that in mind. Is your oak tree a silent protector? Or perhaps you feel that your maple tree brings luck and money to your home? If this is a tree in your orchard, the shrine may be a way by which you can ask for healthy and bountiful harvests!

A few examples:

-Oak: Oak trees are common, and are often symbolic of protection, knowledge, wisdom, and strength. Building a shrine decorated with acorns and fallen oak branches may be a way of encouraging the oak to protect your home, or inspire the drive to learn in your heart. Or even, perhaps, it can be a way of honoring the Oak King if you follow the Wiccan Wheel of the Year!

-Maple: Often associated with the moon, maple trees are linked to both magic and healing. Shrines dedicated to bringing about good health and happiness are ideal with maple trees, allowing them to extend their healing energies to you!

-Pine: Pine trees, a mainstay in the northern hemisphere, are trees of strength and raw power. They are ancient and invoke a sense of mystery. Shrines built at the base of a pine tree can be dedicated to finding that primal strength that lives within all of us, and for helping us connect with the past. These are excellent trees for ancestor shrines, depending upon your practice.

-Apple: Speaking of ancestor worship, apple is associated with otherworld. Its link to the dead is on a mythical scope, lending its energies quite well to ancestor shrines. However, it is also a tree of fertility and choice. As such, shrines meant to encourage fertility in the garden or one’s own fertility are great when built at the base of an apple tree. Furthermore, it helps encourage decisive action, inspiring quick decision making and wise undertakings.

In Conclusion…

While this week’s article is quite different from most, it calls us back to a time when the gardens we tended were the ones planted by nature itself. Whether your shrine is dedicated to the tree or some other spirit, or if it is built to honor an altogether different plant, it is a useful tool for the garden witch who thrives when working magic outdoors.

Consider how your garden can benefit from the added spiritual energy of shrines. Perhaps the trees have more to offer than we may realize!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O(

The Witchy Lifestyle: Shrines, Altars, and Holy Places

Last week, I posted up an article on Domestic Garden Witch about building shrines near trees in a garden in order to provide a space for magic or worship or meditation. The amount of popularity that this article had gained showed me that, at least to some extent, there is a love or desire for building shrines and altars in many places where shrines aren’t necessarily as common as one would like. Indeed, as I walk through the beautiful city of San Luis Obispo, I see a lot of religious diversity - a gorgeous mosque, the imposingly beautiful Presbyterian church in downtown, the historic Catholic mission at the heart of the city, and a pagan boutique on the very same road where we hold our Farmers’ Market.

Each church has its altar. And I’ve been in pagan stores that have community altars. When it comes to shrines, however, I hardly ever see any around here in public spaces. It’s not to say that I don’t see shrines on occasion. There is a lovely salon near where I live which has a gorgeous shrine right in the front of their store for welcoming business and honoring the gods. But I found myself wondering, “could part of this be due to a bit of confusion over what is a shrine and what isn’t?”

The only concrete answer to that question is “maybe.” But in thinking a bit harder, I realized that it would still be good to discuss shrines in a little more detail. As a community, we as witches and pagans talk a lot about altars and magical spaces (or holy spaces, depending on what vernacular you prefer). As such, it’s not uncommon to see a witch or pagan with at least one space in the home which has candles and some sort of religious iconography, either in a simple and clean setup or in as complex a setup as my coven’s Lughnasadh altar.

So much happiness and peace!

But to get back to the point… What is the difference between an altar and a shrine? And what role would each have to play in a tradition?

Magic and Worship In Communal Space

Altars, as I’ve mentioned, are something we see a lot of in the witchy and pagan communities. From aesthetic posts to tutorials, as well as instructions in some spells for how to properly set up an altar. I have yet to see a “starter’s guide” to witchcraft or paganism that does not have a chapter devoted to building and consecrating an altar.

In short, an altar serves a couple of purposes: providing a place for meditation and worship for a pantheon, and anchoring/grounding magical workings done on and near it. In this way, an altar is essentially the Swiss Army Knife of witchcraft. It is in itself a tool, but also houses multiple other tools, such as wands, athames, candles, stones… you get the picture. By itself, an altar need not be religious, and instead serves a much more practical use in magic as storage and anchoring space.

As an anchor, altars are places where we place ourselves into a magical mindset. A circle may be cast around an altar, with the altar being the focus for where spellwork is being done. Like a magnifying glass focusing sunlight, the altar can help concentrate energy to enhance our magical workings. And, in guided meditations, the altar can also serve as a beacon - helping us find our way back to ourselves if we begin to feel that we’re straying too far in the astral.

As a religious space, the altar becomes dual-purpose. In this situation, it is not only used for magical workings, but also for worship - usually to multiple deities in polytheistic traditions. As such, my home altar can be seen with statues for archetypal god and goddess, as well as dragon imagery and more specific symbols for my deities (such as a raven’s feather for the Morrigan, a rose for Cerridwen, a Brigid’s cross for Brigid, and occasionally an arrowhead for Cernunnos). My coven’s altar setup varies depending on who is with us - at times, it is strictly generic, while more often we incorporate the deities and traditions of all present (thus resulting in symbolism for Celtic, Norse, Greek, and Egyptian gods, as well as offerings and symbolism for Hecate specifically… we even sometimes have Christian imagery if we’ve got a Christian witch with us).

It’s this variety and ability to be so generic, coupled with its practicality which makes altars so appealing to so many people. It’s why we’re more likely to see communal altars in a public space than a shrine, and it’s why much of our worship tends to happen around them. But this isn’t to say that shrine’s can’t have a particular role in a tradition.

A Familiar Space, with a Special Face

When I was younger, I had the opportunity to tour some of the historic California missions. Most California schools have us do this in grade school, but as I was older, I was doing this for personal research. And in some of the buildings, I came across areas that were set aside for a specific saint - not part of the main altar in the chapel. This intrigued me, given my Lutheran background. My protestant upbringing acknowledged the saints, but that was about the extent of it. Later on, when I was learning more about Dia de los Muertos, I was further intrigued by the same practice being extended not just to saints, but to family members who have passed away.

The traditions revolving around these two practices are different - shrines to saints have a much different purpose than those built for ancestors. This is something that I understand. But break the practice down to its absolute basic level and you have the same practice being done - a space is being designated for honoring and/or worshiping a specific individual. This practice isn’t limited to saints or ancestors, either. 

A shrine to Buddha in Oakland, CA.

There are many religions that are polytheistic, in which there are further denominations, cults, or sects devoted to a more specific deity (e.g. the cult of Demeter in ancient Greece, or the sect of Bast in Lower Egypt). Even monotheistic and non-theistic religions have been known to construct shrines in areas as a means of honoring or worshipping spirits, or as a way of creating a space in which meditation can be done closer to home.

What sets a shrine apart from an altar is its purpose. While a shrine may occasionally be rather large and grand - it is often described as being almost like a home in some practices (in Shinto, a shrine is quite literally the home of a kami or other spirit) - a shrine may also be very simple, like flowers on the roadside where an accident had occurred.

Indeed, some shrines are built without religion or spirituality in mind. A couple of great examples of public shrines are the 9/11 memorials and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. They are non-denominational shrines dedicated to the memories who have lost their lives in combat or in acts of terror. 

Where is the Line or Distinction?

If my description of shrines and altars sounded very similar to one another, this is because both are closely related. Both altars and shrines: are used for meditation or worship or honoring, are spiritual places, and can be very complex or very simple. Some shrines double as temples, and some altars double as churches.

Ultimately, we can use the terms interchangeably in many situations. But what I’ve discovered is that altars are generally practical and used for magic in addition to worship and may or may not be permanent. Meanwhile, I’ve found that shrines are usually permanent, used exclusively for meditation or worship, and usually to only one or two people or deities.

How Can I Use Them?

First, one of the most important things to consider is how you plan to use a space. Is it for ritual or is it for worship? Is it for honoring ancestors or for worshiping gods?

For me, I consider something an altar if I plan on tearing it down regularly for various reasons (my altar which I frequently picture is an altar because I sometimes tear it down for coven work) and if I plan to use it for magical workings. A shrine, on the other hand, is more permanent and may be used for worship more often than magic in my particular brand of paganism. 

If you plan on constructing a shrine, who is it devoted to? I particular god or spirit? An ancestor? Then use materials on it that are appropriate for that individual and tradition. For instance, if I were to construct a shrine to Cernunnos, I may construct it of wood and place plants on and around it. Then, I may incorporate ethically sourced antlers or bones, as well as a candle or two, and possibly an offering bowl. It may also have an image or statue of Cernunnos, depending upon whether it feels right to do so or not.

If I were erecting a shrine for an ancestor, i would consider that ancestor’s beliefs. For instance, if I were to build a shrine for my grandfather, I would have Christian imagery on or around it, as my grandfather was Lutheran. This is out of respect for him and who he is.

In these two instances, I would have shrines for two different purposes - a shrine of worship to Cernunnos, and a shrine honoring the memory of my grandfather.

In Conclusion…

Regardless of the subject of devotion, shrines can add a particular bit of spirituality to any tradition. Throughout history, we have seen both altars and shrines erected just about anywhere humans have lived. We have a natural tendency to assemble images or symbols in one spot in order to more easily pray or honor someone or some spirit.

Perhaps a shrine is right for your practice? Or maybe an altar is best for your work. Work with what helps you most in  your life!

Blessed Be! )O(

Foodie Friday: Milagu Paal

Ingredients:
-¼ tsp turmeric
-¼ tsp powdered black pepper
-Pinch saffron
-Milk
-Sugar or honey (optional)

Bring the milk just to a gentle boil or simmer on the stove. Add each of the spices and stir to mix thoroughly. Sweeten with sugar or honey if desired. Drink hot to prevent cold and flu.

Note: If saffron is not available either due to expense or lack of local supply, consider using ginger instead.

Magical Ingredient!

Though the cold and flu season is technically done here where I live, it still lingers here and there. And as a kitchen witch, I feel I should always be prepared with a home remedy or two just in case those viruses rear their ugly heads again. Cough drops are helpful when the sickness sets in, but preventative remedies and remedies that are known to truly kick a cold’s ass tend to be a little harder to come by depending upon the situation.

Milagu paal, however, is a great remedy both after catching cold or flu and as a preventative, due to the soothing cream of the milk and the antiviral, antibiotic, and anti-inflammatory properties of the spices mixed in. I’ve covered turmeric and curry in the past, but an ingredient I feel often gets glossed over is the ever-present table spice we all know and love: black pepper.

What we see as peppercorn in our pepper mills and grinders is the dried fruit of the pepper vine, native to the tropical regions of India. Its use can be traced back to antiquity as a spice and as a medicine, as an expensive commodity (so much so that it likely was only affordable for the wealthy of Greece, and was used to stuff Ramesses II’s nose during his mummification ritual).

As a medicine, it was often used to treat illnesses ranging from constipation to insomnia, colds and flu. Pepper oil is used today as an ayurvedic massage oil, and its essential oil remains popular.

The presence of pepper in some traditions of witchcraft is undeniable, and among its correspondences are banishing, exorcism, cleansing, healing, prosperity, cursing, hexing, protection, and empowerment.

Most often, pepper is used for protection. Whole peppercorns may be carried in sachets or amulets to ward against Evil Eye, and pepper can be ground and mixed with salt and eggshell to create a potent protection powder.

In root work, pepper is frequently used in Goofer Dust, Hot Foot Powder, and Crossing Powder - all of which are meant to be a jinx to cause bad luck, keep someone away, or simply prevent others from casting hexes and curses against you.

A common practice is to burn peppercorns prior to saging a new home so as to banish evil spirits and negativity. (If you decide to try this, please be conservative in the amount of pepper being used, else the smoke becomes an irritant to the eyes, nose, mouth, and skin).

Work pepper into spells that are linked to deities associated with war or strength, such as Mars or the Morrigan, in order to give an additional bit of heat to the magic.

If seeking to work a prosperity or wealth spell, try incorporating whole peppercorns, as pepper is historically cherished and remains the single-most traded spice in the world. Trade routes for pepper spanned from India and China all the way to Britain, and later on to the Americas, and pepper trade was part of what fueled trade on the Silk Road. As such, peppercorns have a strong association with wealth and prosperity, making them a great addition to such spells.

In the kitchen, the benefits of pepper cannot be overstated. Both from a magical and a culinary standpoint, a kitchen without pepper flounders just as much as a kitchen without salt. When working your magic in the kitchen, consider what type of meal and what the intent of the meal is in order to determine how you should use your pepper. A pot roast, for instance, is great for health, prosperity, and happiness. Consider using whole peppercorns in the seasoning batch to banish sickness and invite wealth. Or, if you’re cooking a dish to provide protection, channel that intent into it as you grind it in a mortar and pestle or in a pepper mill.

And if someone is afflicted with cold and flu, consider working a protection, cleansing, and banishing spell to cast the illness out and bring in health, such as in a traditional Indian milagu paal!

May All Your Meals Be Blessed! )O(

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Let’s just say my naming skills aren’t exactly the best

IMPORTANT!!!! So I know that I’m making comics about Breath of the Wild, but the truth is I actually still don’t know very much about the game, so as strange as this may sound please don’t talk about Breath of the Wild to me!

Click HERE to check out more Breath of the Wild comics!

Click HERE to view my schedule for the current month!

Wondering why there are two Links? Why their equipment isn’t exactly the best? Check out this post for an explanation!

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1k followers appreciation requests || for @kageyawn
→ UshiTen (haikyuu!!)

“I’ll watch all the big events you’re in on television, and I’ll be saying, ‘I was Ushijima’s true friend’, so don’t you dare go slacking on me.”

want one?