new york state newspapers

anonymous asked:

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Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation’s financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and The New York Post newspaper. As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the main author of the economic policies of the George Washington administration. He took the lead in the funding of the states’ debts by the Federal government, as well as the establishment of a national bank, a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain. His vision included a strong central government led by a vigorous executive branch,[1]:3–4 a strong commercial economy, with a national bank and support for manufacturing, plus a strong military. This was challenged by Virginia agrarians Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, who formed a rival party, the Democratic-Republican Party. They favored strong states based in rural America and protected by state militias as opposed to a strong national army and navy. They denounced Hamilton as too friendly toward Britain and toward monarchy in general, and too oriented toward cities, business and banking.

Alexander Hamilton
Alexander Hamilton portrait by John Trumbull 1806.jpg
1st United States Secretary of the Treasury
In office
September 11, 1789 – January 31, 1795
President George Washington
Preceded by Position established
Succeeded by Oliver Wolcott
Senior Officer of the Army
In office
December 14, 1799 – June 15, 1800
President John Adams
Preceded by George Washington
Succeeded by James Wilkinson
Delegate to the Congress of the Confederation
from New York
In office
November 3, 1788 – March 2, 1789
Preceded by Egbert Benson
Succeeded by Seat abolished
In office
November 4, 1782 – June 21, 1783
Preceded by Seat established
Succeeded by Seat abolished
Personal details
Born January 11, 1755 or 1757
Charlestown, Nevis, British Leeward Islands
(now Saint Kitts and Nevis)
Died July 12, 1804 (aged 47 or 49)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Resting place Trinity Church Cemetery
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s) Elizabeth Schuyler
(m. 1780)
Children Philip Hamilton
Angelica Hamilton
Alexander Hamilton Jr.
James Alexander Hamilton
John Church Hamilton
William S. Hamilton
Eliza Hamilton Holly
Philip Hamilton (the second)
Parents James A. Hamilton
Rachel Faucette
Education Columbia University
Signature
Military service
Allegiance New York
United States (1777–1800)
Service/branch New York Company of Artillery
Continental Army
United States Army
Years of service 1775–1776 (Militia)
1776–1781
1798–1800
Rank Union Army major general rank insignia.svg Major general
Commands U.S. Army Senior Officer
Battles/wars American Revolutionary War
• Battle of Harlem Heights
• Battle of White Plains
• Battle of Trenton
• Battle of Princeton
• Battle of Brandywine
• Battle of Germantown
• Battle of Monmouth
• Siege of Yorktown
Quasi-War
Hamilton was born out of wedlock in Charlestown, Nevis. His Scottish-born father, James A. Hamilton, was the fourth son of Alexander Hamilton, laird of Grange, Ayrshire.[2] His mother, born Rachel Faucette, was half-British and half-French Huguenot.[1]:8 Orphaned as a child by his mother’s death and his father’s abandonment, Hamilton was taken in by an older cousin and later by a prosperous merchant family. He was recognized for his intelligence and talent, and sponsored by a group of wealthy local men to travel to New York City to pursue his education. Hamilton attended King’s College (now Columbia University), choosing to stay in the Thirteen Colonies to seek his fortune.

Discontinuing his studies before graduating when the college closed its doors during British occupation of the city,[3] Hamilton played a major role in the American Revolutionary War. At the start of the war in 1775, he joined a militia company. In early 1776, he raised a provincial artillery company, to which he was appointed captain. He soon became the senior aide to General Washington, the American forces’ commander-in-chief. Hamilton was dispatched by Washington on numerous missions to convey plans to his generals. After the war, Hamilton was elected as a representative to the Congress of the Confederation from New York. He resigned to practice law, and founded the Bank of New York.

Hamilton was among those dissatisfied with the weak national government. He led the Annapolis Convention, which successfully influenced Congress to issue a call for the Philadelphia Convention in order to create a new constitution. He was an active participant at Philadelphia, and he helped achieve ratification by writing 51 of the 85 installments of The Federalist Papers which, to this day, are the single most important reference for Constitutional interpretation.[4]

Hamilton became the leading cabinet member in the new government under President Washington. He was a nationalist who emphasized strong central government and successfully argued that the implied powers of the Constitution provided the legal authority to fund the national debt, assume states’ debts, and create the government-backed Bank of the United States. These programs were funded primarily by a tariff on imports, and later also by a highly controversial tax on whiskey. To overcome localism, Hamilton mobilized a nationwide network of friends of the government, especially bankers and businessmen, which became the Federalist Party. A major issue in the emergence of the American two-party system was the Jay Treaty, largely designed by Hamilton in 1794. It established friendly trade relations with Britain, to the chagrin of France and the supporters of the French Revolution. Hamilton played a central role in the Federalist party, which dominated national and state politics until it lost the ele

I think Alexander Hamilton would be more offended at the current state of his legacy newspaper The New York Post than he would be about being removed from the $10 bill.