new york sandy

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Wallace, Havanese (2 y/o), Madison Square Park, New York, NY • “During Hurricane Sandy we were stranded in my wife’s apartment. To pass the time, I told her we should go through the entire alphabet and choose a dog name for each letter. When we got to W we chose ‘Wallace’, and immediately knew we had to find a Wallace. So, we had the name well before we had him.” @wallacenychavanese

oxymitch  asked:

Hello there! There are questions I like to ask....What would happen to the coma patient(s) when there's a power outage on not only the hospital but also the nearby areas of the town/city? And since the coma patient is kept alive by machines, would he/she die when the power is out? Also, what can the hospital staff do during the power outage for the coma patients?

Hey there @oxymitch​! Thanks for the ask! This is an interesting one :) 

First: I’m going to assume that your situation is going to last more than a couple of days, that they’re going to be isolated, and also that it will happen with no warning. Why? Because that’s the model I have to build an answer on. 

Easy ones: If the backup generators work, the power stays on, and the patients will be fine. If the loss of power is transient, less than a few hours, staff can be used to take over the machine functions in the short term. If the hospital has notice and they think they’ll lose power, they can actually transfer out their sickest patients to other facilities. Even if they lose power but the hospital is still accessible, they can request transfers for their sickest patients. Critical care transport units will transport those patients as far as needed to get them an ICU bed somewhere. 

Now, let’s look at the truly catastrophic scenario, because of course we should. 

So, first things first: hospitals have backup generators. As long as t he generators work and have fuel, your hospital will generally function in its usual manner, excepting that they will not permit surgeries in case of a total power failure. 

However, these generators are typically kept at, or even below, the level of the hospital, and flooding can knock these out. It happened in New Orleans during Katrina and I believe it happened in New York during Sandy, with a couple of major hospitals closed due to flooding. 

Let’s assume the power goes down completely – the worst possible case. Worse, help isn’t coming or can’t arrive any time soon – the true disaster scenario. Ambulances can’t get there by ground, all the air support is tied up on other missions or the storms are too bad to fly a helicopter. 

So, what happens to the coma patient in the ICU? Honestly, their outcome isn’t going to be great, and they’ll likely die. 

Ventilator-dependent patients require a machine to breathe for them, with very specific settings: volume, pressure, PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure, essentially the “pushback” from the vent), etc. If the machines go down someone has to ventilate them manually, squeezing a bag 10-20 times a minute, indefinitely. It ties up staff that could be utilized in other places. Hell, that staff member can’t even leave the room for five minutes to pee

The other big issue is that IV pumps go down, too. Most IV pumps have some battery life, and some will last for hours, but many – especially those that are used strictly in-hospital, and have batteries only to get the patient to the bathroom and back – won’t work after 30-180 minutes. So the medications that are keeping most ICU patients alive won’t flow, and getting correct doses by drip – by pure gravity and the graces of a drip set – is next to impossible, especially in the dark. 

So these patients – many of whom are on 3, 8, 10, a dozen medication drips (plus their ventilator), are in deep, deep shit. 

[There is an  ABSOLUTELY PHENOMENAL podcast] about what happened in a hospital in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, based on a book [Five Days at Memorial by Sheri Fink]*. The hospital lost power, lost backup power, were isolated, lost radio contact, kept hearing stories about looting. They were surrounded by water and couldn’t leave. And, surprisingly quickly, the doctors began to euthanize. 

Their logic was this: these patients need machines to breathe for them, to pump them full of medications. Hell, most medication dispensers – the mini-pharmacies on units – absolutely require power to dispense any meds at all

These patients were going to gasp to death without ventilators, or were going to drown in their own fluids from heart failure, or meet whatever end the ICU was barely keeping them from. So doctors decided to give big doses of fentanyl and midazolam – a painkiller and a sedative – and ease their patients’ suffering once and for all. 

Right or wrong, the intent was kind. Right or wrong, their actions probably meet the legal definition of homicide. (Right or wrong, we do this for our pets all the time.) 

The concept of triage is about the greatest good for the greatest number. A fictional hospital might make the choice to allow all ventilated patients to breathe on their own – or not, but to not give them any support. That frees the staff up to save the patients they know they can help. Save who you can, and let go who you can’t. This is done in disasters every day by EMS. 

I’m not saying what happened at Memorial was right, or that it was wrong; that’s not my place. (The NPR podcast goes into that at length.) I’m just saying that it happened, and that you might find it an interesting reference point for your story. 

Hope this helped! 

xoxo, Aunt Scripty

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This lost toy at Vidler’s 5 & 10 in East Aurora is taking to the Internet in an effort to find the friend who misplaced them.  While larger stores might have seen the small cat and thrown him into the trash after a few days of remaining unclaimed, Vidler’s wasn’t about to say “die.”  After fixing the small tear in the toy’s leg, the store made sure to post this whimiscal tale of the cat trying to find his owner in an effort to reunite the two parties.  Reposts and Reblogs of this picture are welcome as they continue to search for the cat’s owner.

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“Even the smallest act of service, the simplest act of kindness, is a way to honor those we lost, a way to reclaim that spirit of unity that followed 9/11.”
—President Obama in a 2011 radio address

“If we learn nothing else from this tragedy, we learn that life is short and there is no time for hate.”
—Sandy Dahl, wife of Flight 93 pilot Jason Dahl, in Shanksville, Pa., in 2002

“One of the worst days in America’s history saw some of the bravest acts in Americans’ history. We’ll always honor the heroes of 9/11. And here at this hallowed place, we pledge that we will never forget their sacrifice.”
—President George W. Bush at the Pentagon in 2008 

“So many names, there is barely room on the walls of the heart.”
—New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg at the World Trade Center site in 2003

The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching.

By Michael Kimmelman, NY Times, June 15, 2017

ROTTERDAM, the Netherlands–The wind over the canal stirred up whitecaps and rattled cafe umbrellas. Rowers strained toward a finish line and spectators hugged the shore. Henk Ovink, hawkish, wiry, head shaved, watched from a V.I.P. deck, one eye on the boats, the other, as usual, on his phone.

Mr. Ovink is the country’s globe-trotting salesman in chief for Dutch expertise on rising water and climate change. Like cheese in France or cars in Germany, climate change is a business in the Netherlands. Month in, month out, delegations from as far away as Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, New York and New Orleans make the rounds in the port city of Rotterdam. They often end up hiring Dutch firms, which dominate the global market in high-tech engineering and water management.

That’s because from the first moment settlers in this small nation started pumping water to clear land for farms and houses, water has been the central, existential fact of life in the Netherlands, a daily matter of survival and national identity. No place in Europe is under greater threat than this waterlogged country on the edge of the Continent. The nation sits largely below sea level and is gradually sinking. Now climate change brings the prospect of rising tides and fiercer storms.

From a Dutch mind-set, climate change is not a hypothetical or a drag on the economy, but an opportunity. While the Trump administration withdraws from the Paris accord, the Dutch are pioneering a singular way forward.

It is, in essence, to let water in, where possible, not hope to subdue Mother Nature: to live with the water, rather than struggle to defeat it. The Dutch devise lakes, garages, parks and plazas that are a boon to daily life but also double as enormous reservoirs for when the seas and rivers spill over. You may wish to pretend that rising seas are a hoax perpetrated by scientists and a gullible news media. Or you can build barriers galore. But in the end, neither will provide adequate defense, the Dutch say.

And what holds true for managing climate change applies to the social fabric, too. Environmental and social resilience should go hand in hand, officials here believe, improving neighborhoods, spreading equity and taming water during catastrophes. Climate adaptation, if addressed head-on and properly, ought to yield a stronger, richer state.

This is the message the Dutch have been taking out into the world. Dutch consultants advising the Bangladeshi authorities about emergency shelters and evacuation routes recently helped reduce the numbers of deaths suffered in recent floods to “hundreds instead of thousands,” according to Mr. Ovink.

“That’s what we’re trying to do,” he said. “You can say we are marketing our expertise, but thousands of people die every year because of rising water, and the world is failing collectively to deal with the crisis, losing money and lives.” He ticks off the latest findings: 2016 was the warmest year on record; global sea levels rose to new highs.

He proudly shows off the new rowing course just outside Rotterdam, where the World Rowing Championships were staged last summer. The course forms part of an area called the Eendragtspolder, a 22-acre patchwork of reclaimed fields and canals–a prime example of a site built as a public amenity that collects floodwater in emergencies. It is near the lowest point in the Netherlands, about 20 feet below sea level. With its bike paths and water sports, the Eendragtspolder has become a popular retreat. Now it also serves as a reservoir for the Rotte River Basin when the nearby Rhine overflows, which, because of climate change, it’s expected to do every decade.

The project is among dozens in a nationwide program, years in the making, called Room for the River, which overturned centuries-old strategies of seizing territory from rivers and canals to build dams and dikes. The Netherlands effectively occupies the gutter of Europe, a lowlands bounded on one end by the North Sea, into which immense rivers like the Rhine and the Meuse flow from Germany and France. Dutch thinking changed after floods forced hundreds of thousands to evacuate during the 1990s. The floods “were a wake-up call to give back to the rivers some of the room we had taken,” as Harold van Waveren, a senior government adviser, recently explained.

“We can’t just keep building higher levees, because we will end up living behind 10-meter walls,” he said. “We need to give the rivers more places to flow. Protection against climate change is only as strong as the weakest link in the chain, and the chain in our case includes not just the big gates and dams at the sea but a whole philosophy of spatial planning, crisis management, children’s education, online apps and public spaces.”

Mr. van Waveren was talking about a national GPS-guided app created so that residents always know exactly how far below sea level they are. To use public pools unrestricted, Dutch children must first earn diplomas that require swimming in their clothes and shoes. “It’s a basic part of our culture, like riding a bike,” Rem Koolhaas, the Dutch architect, told me.

In the Netherlands, scholarly articles about changes to the Arctic ice cap make front-page headlines. Long before climate change deniers began to campaign against science in the United States, Dutch engineers were preparing for apocalyptic, once-every-10,000-years storms. “For us, climate change is beyond ideology,” said Rotterdam’s mayor, Ahmed Aboutaleb. He took me one morning around new waterfront development in a formerly poor, industrial neighborhood, to show how urban renewal dovetails with strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change.

“If there is a shooting in a bar, I am asked a million questions,” Mr. Aboutaleb said of his city. “But if I say everyone should own a boat because we predict a tremendous increase in the intensity of rain, nobody questions the politics. Rotterdam lies in the most vulnerable part of the Netherlands, both economically and geographically. If the water comes in, from the rivers or the sea, we can evacuate maybe 15 out of 100 people. So evacuation isn’t an option. We can escape only into high buildings. We have no choice. We must learn to live with water.”

Rotterdam is clearly trying to cast itself as a model of inventive urbanism. A local businessman, Peter van Wingerden, envisions floating dairy farms along the waterfront. One in every three trucks coming into the city carries food, he said. Floating farms would reduce truck traffic and carbon emissions, supplying the city with its own milk. With the city’s encouragement, he is constructing a $2.2 million prototype, for 40 cows, producing a half-million liters (about 130,000 gallons) of milk a year. “The river is no longer just for industry,” he told me. “We need to find new uses, which keep us safe from climate change, and help the city grow and prosper.”

That’s the city’s mantra. When I asked Mr. van Wingerden if it was unsettling to live in a waterfront city mostly below sea level, he said: “It seems to us less dangerous than living on the San Andreas Fault. At least when we flood, we’ll have some warning before our feet get wet.”

To the Dutch, what’s truly incomprehensible, he added, is New York after Hurricane Sandy, where too little has been done to prepare for the next disaster. People in the Netherlands believe that the places with the most people and the most to lose economically should get the most protection.

The idea that a global economic hub like Lower Manhattan flooded during Hurricane Sandy, costing the public billions of dollars, yet still has so few protections, leaves climate experts here dumbfounded.

Mr. Molenaar, Rotterdam’s climate chief, summed up the Dutch view: “We have been able to put climate change adaptation high on the public agenda without suffering a disaster in many years because we have shown the benefits of improving public space–the added economic value of investing in resilience.

“It’s in our genes,” he said. “Water managers were the first rulers of the land. Designing the city to deal with water was the first task of survival here and it remains our defining job. It’s a process, a movement.

“It is not just a bunch of dikes and dams, but a way of life.”

January 19, 1972

At the age of 36 years and 20 days, former Dodger pitcher Sandy Koufax, who placed himself on the voluntarily retired list because of an arthritic left arm in 1966, becomes the youngest player to be elected into the Hall of Fame. Also getting the nod from the baseball writers are Yankee legend Yogi Berra and Early Wynn, a 300-game winner.

October 2, 1963

In the Game 1 of the World Series‚ Sandy Koufax strikes out his 15th batter of the game when he fans pinch hitter Harry Bright for the final out of LA’s 5-2 victory over the Yankees. Koufax, who struck out the first five Yankeees he faced in the game, surpasses Brooklyn’s Carl Erskine’s 1953 World Series mark of 14, which was also accomplished against New York.

plaasmaa  asked:

Could you please tell us the story behind the songs on Faceless? Are the previously unreleased ones things that just didn't fit into Sol, or did you intend for the EP to have a distinct concept of its own?

“Yes Artemis” is an exploration of how one might embrace an aesthetics of the austere without resorting to tedious tropes of masculinity.  Looking into mythology for someone with coolheaded confidence and supreme competence, Artemis came instantly into view.  The chorus came first here, but for my money, the phrasing of the verses is the most compelling part.  Krys Cannon is a friend of mine locally, and was wonderful to work with.


“Angel in the Jungle” is about incongruities that are both nonsensical and somehow perfect—and how we need them: a logically organized life deserves our suspicion.


“City of the Faceless” started off as a sketch called “When it happens you will know,” and was inspired in part by the old apartment building I lived in in New York City.  When Hurricane Sandy hit, we had to use the stairwells in total darkness, and there was a strange sense of no top or bottom to the whole thing: it reminded me of medieval descriptions of gothic cathedrals. 


“20 GOTO 10" is a cutup poem taken from the more desperate corners of my journal.


And the other new ones are not that new: “The Flock” I wrote at age 14 based on the book The Flock by Joan Frances Casey.  The song was part of a trilogy; I was an ambitious twerp.  “Articles of Secession” was a project we released back in January (more news about this song’s proceeds soon!).  “Beatlock” was written, as the lyrics suggest, after the Bataclan shooting, and first appeared on the latest Electronic Saviors compilation.

Day Twenty-Five

The chair of the town budget committee observed my APUSGOV class today. And did I TOTALLY CRUSH IT? 

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

Really, my students crushed it, because it was a discussion-based lesson, so it would’ve gone badly if they’d had nothing to say. They started by free-writing on this question: What were the major contributors to your political socialization? Then we threw everyone’s responses up on the board. I didn’t take a picture- d’oh!- but here it is from memory:

  • People and Institutions
    • Parents
    • Friends
    • Parents’ friends
    • School (a few teachers were named specifically)
    • Twitter
    • MSNBC
    • Washington Post
    • Various summer learning programs
    • Church
    • The Daily Show
    • Last Week Tonight
    • The New York Times
    • NPR
  • Events
    • Sandy Hook
    • The shootings of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown
    • The 2008 election
    • War On Terror
    • SCOTUS ruling legalizing gay marriage
    • Healthcare debates (ACA and the more recent ones)
    • The 2016 election (most specified the primary as being especially formative)
    • Take a Knee

We chatted through that, and the issues that are important to them as a result of their political socialization. I think it was a good conversation for an observer from a different generation, who is an elected official, to hear; I’m always saying folks should talk to the kids who are what’s next. It goes double for folks in any position of power. 

And it’s just so fascinating. 

I wished we had all day for this one, I really did. But we closed by looking at some data on differences (by gender, race, education level, and age) in political socialization, and I left them with the fact that they’re part of the most diverse generation yet- and the one most able to control its own socialization (thanks, Internet!)- and told them to ponder the political implications of that. 

Boom. 

latimes.com
Los Angeles Times | How 'Outlander' star Sam Heughan gets ready for all those shirtless scenes
By Los Angeles Times

Scottish lads in the 18th century were, by necessity, strong and fit. But they didn’t look like modern-day bodybuilders. Sam Heughan does, and“Outlander” fans don’t seem to mind. The star spends plenty of screen time shirtless as the Highlands warrior Jamie Fraser on the Starz show, which starts its second season tonight. He bulked up for the role with what he called “functional weightlifting and CrossFit type stuff.” But he still makes time for his first fitness passion: running.

How did you get into running?

It just started with strapping on a pair of trainers and going outside. I was traveling a lot as a young actor, and while in a new city I’d want to see the place, so I would just put on my trainers and go for a jog. And the more I did that, the more I found I was traveling longer and longer distances. I just fell into it.

What are some of your fondest memories from your travel runs?

There are so many. I was doing a tour of the Batman live stage production and I challenged the cast to join me to run. One time we were running in Switzerland just before Christmas and it was heavy snow. Another time we were running down the Seine in Paris on Christmas Day and we all had Santa hats on. And I remember training for the Paris marathon I had to get up really early and do a 20-mile training run. I was in Cincinnati and running all alone along the river and saw so much wildlife.

What was it that attracted you to marathon running?

I wanted to challenge myself. I am slightly competitive, but it was more about myself than competing against other people. I did my first one in Paris and loved the whole event: going to a different city, seeing all the sites, and for a space in time you feel like a professional athlete because people are cheering for you. You do one and then you want to do more.

Any other notable marathon experiences?

I did the Los Angeles Marathon last year, and that’s a good one. You get to see a lot of sites and I liked the idea of running to the sea; you can pretend that it’s downhill all the way. My best time is a 3:20 in Paris in 2010, and I trained to try for a 3-hour marathon in New York, but Hurricane Sandy hit and it was canceled. But I got to see New Yorkers band together and help each other out. A movement started called “Run Anyway” … so I did go to Central Park and ran. People were donating clothes and food to those who needed it. It was an amazing show of community spirit.

Tell me about the My Peak Challenge program you created.

I collaborated with my trainer in the UK and Bloodwise — a leukemia and lymphoma charity — and we created an event where I share my love of the outdoors. I’d been doing a lot of hiking in Scotland and discovering my country, so we built a charity that allows people to help themselves while they help others. It’s a workout program and the profits go to the charity. We’ve already raised over $170,000 in just three weeks. We have a whole community online now and it includes people from all walks of life.