new york in history

theverge.com
The New York Public Library just uploaded nearly 200,000 images you can use for free
The New York Public Library just released a treasure trove of digitized public domain images, everything from epic poetry from the 11th century to photographs of used car lots in Columbus, Ohio from the 1930s.
By Andrew J . Hawkins

Over 180,000 manuscripts, maps, photographs, sheet music, lithographs, postcards, and other images were released online Wednesday in incredibly high resolution, and are available to download using the library’s user-friendly visualization tool. It’s a nostalgist’s dream come true.

France has suffered the minor misfortune of being a central focus of not one but two world wars. As you might have guessed, this has had a few long-term consequences. World War I in particular, what with its titanic battles confined in narrow corridors, destroyed some regions so badly that they’re still more or less uninhabitable to this day. 

 "Zone Rouge" is the name given to a chain of areas throughout Northeastern France where people are strictly forbidden from entering unless they’re on official business or are looking to check “get obliterated by ancient ordinance” off of their bucket list. The environment within these areas is completely inhospitable to human life. The soil is contaminated with arsenic and chemical weapon residue. The ground is still littered with human and animal remains. And most worryingly, only a few inches into the soil, you can find unspent ammunition and grenades and unexploded artillery shells.

However, it’s not exactly safe to go digging in the ground even outside of the red zone. Agriculture is a major industry in this area of France, and farmers have no choice but to regularly Hurt Locker their way through potentially explosive fields with their tractors to earn a living. This is known locally as the “Iron Harvest,” because you’ve got to have a sense of humor about these things. When a farmer finds a shell, they can take it to a special dumping ground, where a team from the government’s munitions disposal team will pick it up. It’s estimated that 900 tons of munitions are disposed of in this way every year. And yes, people do die while doing it.

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