new york activists

5

Muslim-American organizers raise funds to repair vandalized Jewish cemetery in St. Louis

  • After vandals toppled more than 100 tombstones in a Jewish St. Louis cemetery over the weekend, two New York-based Muslim-American activists stepped up to rally support. 
  • Soliciting donations for repairs on the cemetery, they nearly tripled their fundraising goal by Wednesday morning.
  • Through crowdfunding site MPower Change, cofounder Linda Sarsour and Celebrate Mercy founder Tarek El-Messidi have, at time of writing, raised over $67,000 for Chesed Shel Emeth Society cemetery. 
  • They set out to raise $20,000, a sum they had reportedly exceeded hours after launching their Muslims Unite to Repair Jewish Cemetery initiative.
  • Should they raise more than the cemetery requires for repairs, Sarsour and El-Messidi will earmark the leftovers for any future damage done to “vandalized Jewish centers,” according to their crowdfunding page. Read more (2/22/17 6:38 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

9

June 28, 2015 marks the 46th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the gay community against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. They are widely considered to constitute the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Police raids on gay bars were routine in the 1960′s, but officers quickly lost control of the situation at the Stonewall Inn. They attracted a crowd that was incited to riot. Tensions between New York City police and gay residents of Greenwich Village erupted into more protests the next evening, and again several nights later. Within weeks, Village residents quickly organized into activist groups to concentrate efforts on establishing places for gays and lesbians to be open about their sexual orientation without fear of being arrested.

After the Stonewall riots, within six months, two gay activist organizations were formed in New York, concentrating on confrontational tactics, and three newspapers were established to promote rights for gays and lesbians. Within a few years, gay rights organizations were founded across the U.S. and the world. On June 28, 1970, the first Gay Pride marches took place in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Chicago commemorating the anniversary of the riots. Similar marches were organized in other cities. Today, Gay Pride events are held annually throughout the world toward the end of June to mark the Stonewall riots.

2

Malcolm X and Redd Foxx reunited in the early 1960′s.

In the early 1940s before converting to The nation of Islam Malcolm Little then known as “Detroit Red” became close friends with Jon Sanford aka Redd Foxx then known as “Chicago Red”. They both were sharp dressers and resembled each other. Both young men worked at Jimmy’s Chicken Shack in Harlem and hustled the street together. Redd confided to Anthony Major, who ran Redd Foxx Productions in the mid-1980s, that Malcolm was the only person he really trusted. “They used to rob places together and sleep on rooftops together. Redd said he knew Malcolm has his back and trusted him. If Redd was in a fight, he could turn his back and know Malcolm was gonna be in the other side, fighting with him.“

For a while they were partners in crime stealing suits and reselling them, dealing marijuana and other petty crimes. They had a falling out as Malcolm’s criminal activities increased resulting in his 6 year incarceration which led to his rebirth as Malcolm X. 

“Malcolm didn’t have the showbiz talent so he didn’t give a damn what he got into,” Redd said. “He’d take on anything to get some dough. He was a little bit more aggressive, but I’d rather be sleeping with a broad and go somewhere [to a club] and do fifteen minutes of comedy.” (Black and Blue: The Redd Foxx Story)

“We became good buddies in a speakeasy where later on I was a waiter; Chicago Red was the funniest dishwasher on this earth. Now he’s making his living being funny as a nationally known stage and nightclub comedian. I don’t see any reason why old Chicago Red would mind me telling that he is Redd Foxx.“ - Malcolm X (The Autobiography of Malcolm X)

For this week’s episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we highlight discussions presented by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture on two documentaries about icons Maya Angelou and John Lewis. To talk about American Masters - And Still I Rise, a film about the Pulitzer-nominated Dr. Angelou, Elizabeth Alexander, Director of Creativity and Free Expression at the Ford Foundation; Rita Coburn Whack, co-director and co-producer of Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise; Louis Gossett, Jr., Academy Award-winning actor; and Colin Johnson, Co-Founder and Principal of Caged Bird Legacy joined Director of the Schomburg Center, Kevin Young. Get in the Way: The Journey of John Lewis is a documentary film about Congressman John Lewis, a civil rights icon and the winner of the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature for March: Book Three. It is discussed by Arva Rice, President and CEO of the New York Urban League; activist and advocate Phil Pierre; and Ahmad Greene, a core member of the Black Lives Matter Movement. In this week’s episode, we’re proud to present conversation around generations of activism with some of our nation’s most inspiring freedom fighters.

Made with SoundCloud

Mel Boozer at the New York City Gay Pride Rally, 1982.
Photo: Jeff Sanyour

Mel Boozer worked to raise LGBT and racism issues within the Democratic Party, working on Jesse Jackson’s 1984 presidential campaign and helping found the mostly black and LGBT Langston Hughes-Eleanor Roosevelt Democratic Club in Washington, DC.

Rosa Alicia Clemente (born April 18, 1972) is a United States community organizer, independent journalist and hip-hop activist. She was the vice presidential running mate of 2008 Green Party Presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney in the 2008 U.S. Presidential election.[1][2][3]

Clemente was born and raised in South Bronx, New York. She is a graduate of the University of Albany and Cornell University.

Clemente’s academic work has focused on research of national liberation struggles within the United States, with a specific focus on the Young Lords Party and the Black Liberation Army. While a student at SUNY Albany, she was President of the Albany State University Black Alliance (ASUBA) and Director of Multicultural Affairs for the Student Association. At Cornell she was a founding member of La Voz Boriken, a social/political organization dedicated to supporting Puerto Rican political prisoners and the independence of Puerto Rico.

Clemente has written for Clamor Magazine, The Ave. magazine, The Black World Today, The Final Call and numerous websites.[4] She has been the subject of articles[5] in the Village Voice, The New York Times, Urban Latino and The Source magazines. She has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, C-SPAN, Democracy Now! and Street Soldiers.[6][7] In 2001, she was a youth representative at the United Nations World Conference against Xenophobia, Racism and Related Intolerance in South Africa and in 2002 was named[citation needed] by Red Eye Magazine as one of the top 50 Hip Hop Activists to look out for.

In 1995, she developed Know Thy Self Productions (KTSP), a full-service speakers bureau, production company and media consulting service. Seeing a need for young people of color to be heard and taken seriously, she began presenting workshops and lectures at colleges, universities, high schools, and prisons. Since 1995, Clemente has presented at over 200 colleges, conferences and community centers on topics such as “African-American and Latino/a Intercultural Relations”, “Hip-Hop Activism”, “The History of the Young Lords Party”, and “Women, Feminism and Hip Hop”. KTSP now includes an expanded college speakers bureau which has produced three major Hip Hop activism tours, “Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win” with M1 of dead prez and Fred Hampton Jr.; “The ACLU College Freedom Tour” with dead prez, DJ Kuttin Kandi, Mystic and comedian Dave Chappelle; and the “Speak Truth to Power” Tour a collaborative tour of award winning youth activists.

More Information on Rosa Clemente

Act Up in Anger
David Handelman, Rolling Stone, Issue 573, 8 March 1990

A controversial group has become the catalyst for innovations in the way we fight AIDS

It was September 14th, 1989; more Americans had already died of AIDS-related causes than the 58,000 that had died in Vietnam. And, sneaking into the New York Stock Exchange, wearing suits and fake trader ID badges, carrying chains, handcuffs and foghorns, Peter Staley and six colleagues from ACT UP — the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power — were fighting a war too.…  More >

10

From the writings of influential, controversial and acclaimed New York artist and AIDS activist David Wojnarowicz comes 7 Miles a Second, with art by James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook, from @fantagraphics

It’s just one of the thousands of comics you can read with our new all-you-can-read subscription service, comiXology Unlimited!

youtube

De Blasio & NYPD: Stop racist targeting of protesters

Press conference at New York City Hall by activists arrested on May Day 2017 at Union Square, May 10, 2017.

8

Crack is Wack X 1986

This mural on a handball court at 128th Street and 2nd Avenue in East Harlem was inspired by the crack epidemic and its effect on New York City. It was created as a warning and was initially executed independently without permission. Facing possible jail time the mural caught the attention of the NY Post which ran an article on it and Haring gained the public’s support. He ended up being fined only $100. The mural was soon vandalized so a worker in the Parks Department painted over it without permission. Haring was then asked to paint the mural again. The mural was immediately put under the protection and jurisdiction of the City Department of Parks and still exists.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-israel/keith-haring-crack-is-wack-mural_b_5651871.html

Mel Boozer on the floor of the Democratic National Convention, New York City, 13 August 1980.
Photo by Lisa M. Keen, Washington Blade archive.

Melvin Boozer was nominated in 1980 for the office of Vice President of the United States by the Socialist Party USA and, by petition at the convention, by the Democratic Party. He was the first openly gay person ever nominated for the office. Boozer spoke to the Democratic convention in a speech televised in prime time, calling on the party to support equality for LGBT people.

Boozer received 49 votes before the balloting was suspended and then-Vice President Walter Mondale was renominated by acclamation.

At the time of his nomination, Boozer served as President of what was then known as the Gay Activists Alliance of Washington, DC.

5

Andy Warhol, Grace Jones and Keith Haring as they attend a American Foundation for Aids Research fundraiser at the Jacob Javits Center, New York, New York, May 1, 1986. 

Sending NYC love to #Ferguson.

If you were to witness a bias-based attack or a hate crime, how would you respond?

It’s something some activists are preparing some New Yorkers to be ready for, as reports of hate crimes in the city have increased since the election of Donald Trump. They are up 63 percent compared to the same period last year as of Dec. 14, according to the New York City Police Department.

Earlier this month, a man allegedly threatened to cut the throat of an off-duty police officer wearing a hijab. Two days later, a transit worker wearing a hijab was allegedly pushed down the stairs in Grand Central Terminal by a man who called her a “terrorist.”

Christen Brandt, a trainer with the Center for Anti-Violence Education, wants more bystanders who witness attacks and hate crimes to become what she calls “upstanders” — people who will intervene rather than just walk away.

In New York, Activists Prepare Bystanders To Take Action Against Harassment

Photo: Canadian Pacific/Flickr