new years eve concert

anonymous asked:

Would you mind sharing something to help me get a little hope back? I need some in my life right now, if it doesn't bother you.

Today it snowed in my hometown and I woke up to children shouting in the streets, and when I walked to the park, a group of kids were taking turns sledding down the hill on a trashcan lid. All the snow blew in and covered up the mud and debris, and those kids were so happy, perched like tiny birds on the top of that hill, flying down on their shiny silver sled. 

I live with a girl named Leni, and on New Year’s Eve, she took me to a concert and she and her boyfriend tried to find me a midnight kiss because they didn’t want me to be alone, but instead of kissing someone, I stood on the pews at the edge of the room while the gospel of a countdown sounded, and I watched a hundred people kiss each other to the music of The Egotones, a local band dabbling in psychedelic tunes, and I felt no loss. This is so achingly new to me, to, for the first time, feel free standing in a crowded room, hosting a conversation only with myself. Afterwards, we went to Shari’s, and I ate half of Leni’s pancakes, and I watched her lay her head on her boyfriend’s broad, safe shoulder, and there was an undeniable tenderness between them that I saw but did not envy, because it was beautiful but it must be so hard to stay soft like that.

Leni went to the park with me today and tried sledding down a hill on a tin baking pan from our kitchen, but mostly she tripped and tumbled over herself, and in her wake, the pan left grease smears on the powdery snow. Leni is a very brave person, and she has a lot of light in her, and I like to think she left some smears of that in the snow as well, for the bird children to pick up and bring home with them after they’ve finished flying for the day. 

There is an undeniable tenderness in the world, in the way it rotates, and I do not envy it, because it must be so hard to stay soft like that. But, I swear, it is beautiful, and it shines like Leni and the bird children and the silver sled of the trashcan lid, which I picked up from its place in the snow, dented at the rim, and brought home.

This is to say, I wish you well; I hope you are filled with the most tender light.

-

d.a.s

Raise your hand if your excited for the Out Of The Woods Music Video Premier on New Years Rockin Eve!!🙋

youtube

Thank you Nobel Peace Prize for letting me play at this brilliant event. I am so honored and I will never forget this evening. ❤️❤️❤️

Social disparity is to blame for rape, not Westernisation: Javed Akhtar

Celebrated Indian poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar on Sunday rebuffed claims that Westernisation leads to rapes and other crimes against women.

In response to a question from the audience at the Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF), Akhtar said Indian actors going to Hollywood or some popstar “performing in Bengaluru” does not lead to molestation and rape.

Incidents of molestation were reported in Bengaluru on New Year’s eve, following which a concert by French DJ David Guetta was cancelled, first in Bengaluru and then in Mumbai.

“Westernisation in no way leads to such incidents,” Akhtar said. “It is because of two basic reasons: social segregation and economic divide.”

The 72-year-old lyricist reminded the audience that a vast majority of young men living in towns do not even talk for more than five minutes with a girl until they reach the age of 25.

“This is how we define our ‘sabhyata’ (culture).

"How would somebody, who has never even spoken to a girl, appreciate her and understand that she is something more than her body? For him, it is only body and lust.”

This segregation of the society, according to Akhtar, results in an “unwanted temperament” among young men and that is the reason for such incidents.

“The other reason is the economic divide. What happened to the girl in Delhi does not reflect lust or want for sex. It showed anger, frustration and how much of venom they had against the society. They did not just rape her, it was brutality.”

It is because there is an economic divide.

“People come from small towns, live in shabby conditions and they see the rich and affluent leading luxurious life. Added to it is their previous experience–segregation. They have not talked properly to a girl ever.”

Akhtar contended that the “future definitely belongs to women, not to men”. He also warned that blaming everything on Westernisation was not the solution to the problem.

“If you do wrong diagnosis of the disease of your country, then you can never get rid of it. You have to accept the real reasons that lead to such incidents.”

The session, After the Angry Young Man, the Traditional Woman, What?, was one of the most awaited sessions at the 10th edition of JLF and drew a packed audience.

Among other issues, he shared his perspective on the “adarsh bharatiya nari” (the ideal Indian woman) as depicted in Hindi cinema.

“We have seen that there used to be two women in our films earlier: one, the 'adarsh bharatiya nari’, who would do all things good, respect her husband and so on and so forth; and then, there would be the other one, who did everything that the audience wanted to see.

"After a husband would come home drunk from a 'mujra’, the 'adarsh bharatiya nari’ was expected to remove his shoes and provide him comfort. But this definition is now changing. Women in our films are more progressive today.”

Praising movies like Piku, Pink and Dil Dhadakne Do, he said the roles of women in such films truly portray the changing social status-quo in India.

“To establish that you are empowered, you do not need to smoke a cigarette onscreen or boast to sleep with a number of men from various nationalities. Empowerment doesn’t mean this.”

“The role that Katrina played in Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara truly represents an empowered woman. When she is in a swimsuit, you are not looking at her body or figure but at her as a teacher, and it is both played and portrayed brilliantly,” he said.

The celebrated lyricist expressed his disappointment over item songs, saying they simply mean, “they are not related to the movie”.

Among the most respected Indian poets, lyricists and script writers, Akhtar is a man of all seasons.

He is a recipient of the Padma Shri (1999), Padma Bhushan (2007) and the Sahitya Akademi Award as well as 13 Filmfare Awards.

Social disparity to blame for molestation, rape: Javed Akhtar

Jaipur, Jan 22 (IANS) Celebrated Indian poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar on Sunday rebuffed claims that Westernisation leads to rapes and other crimes against women.


In response to a question from the audience at the Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF), Akhtar said Indian actors going to Hollywood or some popstar “performing in Bengaluru” does not lead to molestation and rape.

Incidents of molestation were reported in Bengaluru on New Year’s eve, following which a concert by French DJ David Guetta was cancelled, first in Bengaluru and then in Mumbai.

“Westernisation in no way leads to such incidents,” Akhtar said. “It is because of two basic reasons: social segregation and economic divide.”

The 72-years-old lyricist reminded the audience that a vast majority of young men living in towns do not even talk for more than five minutes with a girl until they reach the age of 25.

“This is how we define our ‘sabhyata’ (culture).

"How would somebody, who has never even spoken to a girl, appreciate her and understand that she is something more than her body? For him, it is only body and lust.”

This segregation of the society, according to Akhtar, results in an “unwanted temperament” among young men and that is the reason for such incidents.

“The other reason is the economic divide. What happened to the girl in Delhi does not reflect lust or want for sex. It showed anger, frustration and how much of venom they had against the society. They did not just rape her, it was brutality.”

It is because there is an economic divide.

“People come from small towns, live in shabby conditions and they see the rich and affluent leading luxurious life. Added to it is their previous experience – segregation. They have not talked properly to a girl ever.”

Akhtar contended that the “future definitely belongs to women, not to men”. He also warned that blaming everything on Westernisation was not the solution to the problem.

“If you do wrong diagnosis of the disease of your country, then you can never get rid of it. You have to accept the real reasons that lead to such incidents.”

The session, “After the Angry Young Man, the Traditional Woman, What?” was one of the most awaited sessions at the 10th edition of JLF and drew a packed audience.

Among other issues, he shared his perspective on the “adarsh bharatiya nari” (the ideal Indian woman) as depicted in Hindi cinema.

“We have seen that there used to be two women in our films earlier: one, the 'adarsh bharatiya nari’, who would do all things good, respect his husband and so on and so forth; and then, there would be the other one, who did everything that the audience wanted to see.

"After a husband would come home drunk from a 'mujra’, the 'adarsh bharatiya nari’ was expected to remove his shoes and provide him comfort. But this definition is now changing. Women in our films are more progressive today.”

Praising movies like “Piku”, “Pink” and “Dil Dhadakne Do”, he said the roles of women in such films truly portray the changing social status quo in India.

“To establish that you are empowered, you do not need to smoke a cigarette onscreen or boast to sleep with a number of men from various nationalities. Empowerment doesn’t mean this.

"The role that Katrina played in 'Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara’ truly represents an empowered woman. When she is in a swimsuit, you are not looking at her body or figure but at her as a teacher, and it is both played and portrayed brilliantly,” he said.

The celebrated lyricist expressed his disappointment over item songs, saying they simply mean, “they are not related to the movie”.

Among the most respected Indian poets, lyricists and script writers, Akhtar is a man of all seasons.

He is a recipient of the Padma Shri (1999), Padma Bhushan (2007) and the Sahitya Akademi Award as well as 13 Filmfare Awards.

(Saket Suman is in Jaipur at the invitation of Teamwork Arts. He can be contacted at saket.s@ians.in)

–IANS

ss/nir/mr