new parkway

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Ted Bundy and the Golden Valley Animal Humane Society

Like a lot of people I’ve started watching “Mindhunter”, the gripping Netflix series that looks to peel back the layers of what makes someone a serial killer, and it made me think of a picture I took of an ordinary plaque at the Animal Humane Society in Golden Valley earlier this year.

As you walk in to the Animal Humane Society, to the right of the front doors you’ll see a plaque outside the auditorium where they hold events like “hoppy hour” for bunnies and their annual book sale fundraiser. I’ve walked past this plaque dozens of times over the years when I’ve visited and never gave it a second thought (between park benches and community gardens I think we all become numb to memorial plaques). When I Googled just the right amount of key words a few months ago to find Elizabeth and discover why she died at such a young age, I assumed I might stumble across a story on how she passed away from cancer or maybe a car crash…not a brutal murder.

Although he never confessed to it, Ted Bundy is strongly suspected of killing Elizabeth Perry and Susan Davis and that these were the murders that started him down the road as being one of America’s most notorious serial killers.

To this day the case remains officially unsolved.

I, for one, cannot believe that on August 21st my whipped ass was pulled over on the side of the New Jersey parkway to watch a video of a fucking snake tail that Taylor the swift posted after emerging from her diamond studded den in the depths of earth trying to figure out what the shit was going on

And now we are TWO WEEKS AWAY from the album that is about to bring salvation upon the human race and I CANT! FIND! MY CHILL!!!!!

The Borough Hall Station on the Nos. 2 and 3 Lines.

@nytransitmuseum

Quantum Flux [Instrumental Version]
Northlane
Quantum Flux [Instrumental Version]

Q U A N T U M F L U X

Northlane // Singularity [Instrumental Version] (2014)

The Cathedral Parkway-110th Street Station on the No. 1 Line.

@nytransitmuseum