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Eastman Johnson (1824-1906)
“A Ride for Liberty - The Fugitive Slaves”
(1862)
Oil on paperboard
Located in the Brooklyn Museum, New York City, New York, United States

Johnson portrayed an enslaved family charging for the safety of Union lines in the dull light of dawn. The absence of white figures in this liberation subject makes it virtually unique in art of the period—these African Americans are independent agents of their own freedom. Johnson claimed to have based the painting on an actual event he witnessed near the Manassas, Virginia, battlefield on March 2, 1862, just days before the Confederate stronghold was ceded to Union forces.

Worries [Germany - present-day France, Strasbourg, 1280-1300]

Although the head certainly belonged to a column figure, it is unknown whether it was part of the sculptural program of Strasbourg Cathedral or of another church in that city.

© Marie V Vollmer aka Lulette  ||  The Cloisters, Fort Tryon, Manhattan, New York City, 23 février 2011

Childe Hassam (1859-1935)
“Broadway and 42nd Street” (1902)
Oil on canvas
American Impressionism
Located in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, New York, United States

David Hammons (b. 1943) is an African-American artist from New York City. Among his works, which are often inspired by the civil rights and Black Power movements, one of the best known is the “African American Flag”, which he designed in 1990 by recoloring the U.S. national flag in the Garvey colors (red, black, and green of the Pan-African flag). The flag is a part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and a copy is hoisted at the entrance to the Studio Museum in Harlem, a New York museum devoted to the art of African-Americans.