new inspo

Part of Your World, A Tarquin Fan fiction, Part i

It took me about a week to finally get working on this but here it is! The first installation of my Tarquin fan fiction :) I’m so excited for everyone to read this and I hope you like it. It’s a little long, got carried away haha. @writtenbyourstruly credit to this lady for giving me the ideas for this fic and the things that happen in it!!! 

Can you find the inspiration for this fic because I was highly influenced and now I can’t go back lol enjoy!

Keep reading

College can be a lot sometimes. Over the past two years I’ve learned some helpful little tricks that help to keep me sane and on top of things, and it’s time I passed them on to all of you! Ahead in part one: scheduling classes, going to them, and homework. Be on the lookout for part two soon!

i. scheduling classes 

  • Take a full load, but keep it balanced.
    • Don’t schedule all of the tough classes for one semester. 
    • Also try to schedule it so that you will have a variety of homework (ie a mix of writing, tests, and worksheet focused classes)
  • Always speak to your advisor before scheduling classes.
  • Keep in mind that you will need time for homework and online classes when making your schedule.
    • Whether it means choosing not to have classes on certain days, putting a two hour break in between classes, or having all your classes in the afternoon so you can study in the mornings.
  • Keep in mind your personality when picking times.
    • 8AMs are rough. Unless you are the world’s biggest morning person, avoid them if you can. 
  • Be sure to have a plan for eating meals!
    • Some schools will let you bring your lunch into class, but I prefer to have a break during lunch so I can relax while I eat. 
  • Look at a map of campus when scheduling and try to schedule classes in the same building back-to-back, or at least near each other. 

ii. classes

  • Never go to class without a bottle of water and a pen.
  • If it’s a workday and you’re given the option to leave class and work elsewhere, actually use that time to work.
  • Sit wherever you’re comfortable. A lot of posts say to sit up front, but I personally prefer to sit further back so that I can fidget without worrying about distracting others. Figure out what works for you.
  • After about the third class, seats might as well be assigned. Don’t move and throw everyone else off unless you really have to.
  • Always be respectful and kind to your teachers and classmates.
  • Make at least one friend in every class. You don’t have to be bffs, but chat with the person you sit beside before every class so that you have someone to study or share notes with if you need to.
  • If you need to fidget to pay attention, consider bringing a small container of Play-Doh with you to lectures (you may want to let your teacher know what’s up, they’ll almost definitly be cool with it).

iii. homework

  • Unlike high school, you really can’t skip homework. Instead of getting lots of small worksheets, your grade will be decided by a few bigger projects or papers. Try to stay on top of things!
  • Break larger projects up into smaller deadlines.
  • If a class has a lot of worksheets as homework, start a study group so that you can all work on them together. 
  • Try to start homework as soon as you get it.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask from help from teachers, tutors, or classmates.
  • As soon as you get a syllabus, enter all of the due dates into your planner. If you wanna go the extra mile (hint: you do), go ahead and add in dates to start working on projects, too. 
  • Work ahead so that you have the flexibility to hang out with your friends at the last minute, instead of being stuck in the library working on a project that’s due first thing in the morning. 
  • Never plagiarize. It’s the fastest way to get kicked out of a class, or even a whole program. If you’re not sure if it needs a citation, it needs a citation. 
  • The number one rule is simple: do all your work, and do it the best you can. As long as you follow that, you’ll be golden. 

Happy studying, and be on the lookout for part two coming soon!

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Not my most favorite spread, but it did its job right. My mental health has been kind of iffy this week so I’m hoping that keeping my mind on cleaning/re-decorating/re-arranging my room will keep my focus on something more productive. There’s nothing like a good spring cleaning and my room definitely needs some tidying up.

Now Playing:

Last Hope- Paramore

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04.04.17 45/100: sorry for the fact i went off on one last night. reading it back, i’m sorry if i came off as calling people fake or saying not to care ?? i meant that u don’t have to make everything look perfect all the time.

anyways - today im at home and i’m already on my second cup of tea at 11am. trying to read and highlight my revision guide before i make notes. it’s longer but idk it helps to cut down on things and i guess i do have 2 weeks to sort my shit out.

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sunday, 4 · june

i cannot believe i have only less than a month left to finish my first year at uni!!!! i have been the most inactive studyblr ever, but with all the uni work and some health issues i’ve been having it’s been really impossible, so far this year is not going as planned, but i guess we still have half of it and summer coming up soon!

here is a snippet of my work area and the views i have from here (click to expand), i cannot complain 😌  let me know how this year is going so far, i’d love to chat! (filter on pics is iphone’s fade hehe) 💛 

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a message from women:
do you know what it’s like to be left alone in love?
do you know what it’s like to feel stuck in love?
do you know what it’s like to be too depressed?
do you know what it’s like to have to beg for
forever from a person who neglects your history?
do you what it’s like to lose everything?
do you know what it’s like to feel abandoned?
do you know what it’s like to wait?
do you know that i will never be too near or too far away?
honestly, i’m still waiting for closure.
i still question what this is— or what this was?
because i can’t help but hope
our feelings were mutual.
do you know how it feels to constantly chase
a feeling you’re addicted to?
do you know i’ve got the jones for you.
and an appetite. and a sweet tooth.
do you know i prayed for you?
from night ’til day.
regardless of my better judgement or dismay
time after time after promises
that never seemed impossible or too good to be TRUE.
do you know what it’s like to try
convincing yourself that— this was the truth.
like i was the woman created for you.
do you know how much i’ve craved you?
i’ve searched for you everywhere
in people, in prayer, in psalm.
in different lovers, in god.
and god— i, wish you really knew.
that i’d love you till death,
or that i’d kill for you.
or that i feel you, like soul deep, like
deeper than anyone ever will.
do you know what it’s like to feel dead inside
and see you so alive, still?

but these days i feel alive.
i’ve been able to realize
you just weren’t meant for me.
these days i don’t cry over
spilled milk.
or lost love
or things i have no control of.
these days i just love myself more.
i just know there’s a happily ever after.
these days i just — don’t see it with you.
nothing personal i think i just fell too quick for your potential.
i just wanted you to be the one.
i just thought we made sense
but now i love myself enough to know better..

—  Reyna Biddy

Public speaking is very few people’s favorite thing. It can be so terrifying to get up in front of a whole class and present your project, so here are a few tips on nailing your next speech and feeling a little less nervous while you’re at it.

i. preparing your speech

  • Start with a topic that you care about, and be sure that:
    • It’s not too general that you don’t have enough time to cover it (like ‘the history of the US’ for a five minute speech) or too specific that you will run out of material.
  • Some people talk faster when they are nervous, some people slow down. Find out which you are and plan accordingly.
  • Make several drafts, and send them to your teacher if you can.
  • Create your visual aids (PowerPoint, handouts, etc) before your final draft, so you can make changes as necessary.
  • Don’t put too much text on your slides, other wise your audience (and maybe you) will get distracted by trying to read them.
    • Stick to using slides for quick facts, statistics, and pictures.
  • Don’t use the sound effects options they have for changing slides, it will just be a distraction.
  • For a speech you’re just giving once, you probably won’t have the timing down enough to use automatic changes.
  • Don’t put too much information on one slide. Just the point you’re on, and maybe the next, will be enough to fill it if your font is as large as it should be. 
  • Make sure you have your slides saved in at least two places (typically a flash drive and your email) so that if you can’t access one you have a back up.
  • Think about what questions people might have about your topic, and be prepared to answer them. Also brush up on any opposing views if the exist so that you can address those, both in the speech and in questions.

ii. making your flashcards 

  • Write bigger and clearer than you think you need.
    • I find it a bit difficult to read when I get nervous, especially when I’m just glancing down quickly. Write in print, and stick to just one or two points per card so that you can write largely.
  • Don’t write whole sentences, just key words.
    • If you have too much information you’ll be tempted to read it all off. Instead, just write down a word or two that will remind you of your point if you get off track.
  • Number your flashcards, and consider putting them on a ring. 
    • That way, if you drop your cards on the way up you won’t start out flustered.
  • Remember to put when to change the slide so you don’t forget and end up behind, or leaving it on the same slide the whole time. 
  • Color code your cards so that you can see what’s happening at a glance.
    • I typically use blue for stats/things I need to quote directly, grey for slide changes, and pink for points to emphasize. 
  • All speeches should end with you asking for questions, so be sure to add that into your last card. 

iii. practicing

  • Always practice out loud, even if you feel silly. 
    • It’s important to hear and feel yourself saying the speech to get comfortable performing it.
  • Time yourself practicing your rough draft a few times, so you know if you need to make it longer or shorter. 
  • Practice with your visual aids a few times
  • Practice it all the way through if you can; if you mess up, brush it off and keep going.
  • Film yourself practicing, so you can see if there’s anything you’re not noticing that you need to adjust.
  • Practice everyday, even if it’s just for a few minutes some days.
  • The more you practice, the more comfortable you’ll feel.

iv. getting ready to speak

  • On the day of your speech, be sure to eat a good breakfast/lunch so you don’t get light headed.
  • Dress in an outfit that makes you feel confident and isn’t distracting: no busy patterns, large logos, or short hemlines that you would be tugging at the whole time. 
  • Double check that you have everything you need before you leave – cards, slides, and any handouts you may need.
  • This TED Talk has some great tips on faking confidence. I highly recommend watching it, but if you don’t have the time one of the take aways is that certain poses can trick your brain into feeling confident. She actually suggests going into a bathroom stall and standing in a “Superman” sorta pose for a minute or so. You’ll feel really silly, but strangely it helps. 
  • While you’re in there, adjust your hair/check your teeth so you’re not worried about that when you get up there. 
  • If you get to choose when you speak, think strategically: will going first and getting it out of the way make you feel better? Or would you rather wait and see a few people speak first?
    • I really don’t suggest waiting until the very last slot, but I like to go second or third to have the best of both worlds.
  • When you get to class, lay out everything you need and glance over your notes one more time. Then take a deep breath. You’ve got this.

v. the speech

  • When you get up to speak, take your time laying out everything you need and setting up your slides. 
  • After you’ve gotten the slides on, test the remote to see how sensitive it is. Just flipping to the first slide and back to the intro will help you feel less flustered if it’s more sensitive than you think and jumps around.
  • Take a deep breath and get started. If you mess up, no will know but you. Just keep going and act confident.
  • Glance back for just a second when changing slides to make sure you’re on the right one.
  • Make eye contact! The biggest mistake I see people make is to look down or above everyone’s head. Make eye contact with everyone more or less equally so it doesn’t look like you’re staring people down (but, if there’s someone that’s extra smiley/encouraging don’t be afraid to come back to them when you get nervous).
  • If you feel yourself starting to get nervous or starting to talk too fast/slow, it’s okay to take a second to take a deep breath and center yourself. Don’t be afraid of a couple seconds of silence if you need them.
  • If the podium helps you feel less nervous, use it. If moving around helps you loosen up, that works too! 
  • If you get off track, you are likely only one that even noticed that you messed up, so just take a deep breath, take a look at your notes, and get back on track the best you can (”going back to the second point,” or “but before we get to that,”).
  • If you’ve noticed that something’s wrong that needs to be addressed (like you’re on the wrong slide, or you misspoke and gave an incorrect fact) you can say something simple like “Sorry, I misspoke, it’s actually 1 in 3 Americans, not 1 in 4″ or try to make a joke if the subject lends to it and move onto your next point.
  • No matter what happens, it’s all good. Try to to panic and say things like “sorry, guys, I’m just so nervous” because that’s basically the only thing that will tip them off that you are. 

Above all, just try to relax and remember that you’re doing a good job. No one but you can tell how nervous you are or will know if you mess up. 

Sometimes advice to be more productive asks a lot of you, perhaps too much. It’s okay if you’re not ready to throw away your TV. It’s okay if you don’t want to get up at 4AM to work out. Through extensive reading of self-help books and trying these myself, I found these little tips yield big results.

1. Get Out of Bed Earlier. Most people naturally have more energy in the morning. But not all of us are morning people. It helps to:

  • Let in natural light. Open the blinds to wake yourself up.
  • Drink a glass of water. After sleeping, you are usually dehydrated, and often dehydration is confused with tiredness.

2. Get Ready to Face the Day. It usually helps to be dressed when facing the day, even if you have nowhere to be.

  • Get dressed. Nothing fancy, just something comfortable, something you might wear to school.
  • Wash your face + brush your teeth.
  • Eat a substantial breakfast.

3. Start With the Hardest Thing. If you haven’t already made your to do list for the day, make one, and then begin with the hardest task on the list. Since the morning is when you have the most drive and energy, putting it off might mean that you may not have the energy to accomplish it later.

4. Unplug Yourself. Untether yourself from your phone while you work. Attempting to multitask just divides your attention and makes you less efficient. Get an app that keeps you away from your phone. I find Forest works well for me. If you’re really struggling with the internet, put your computer away and go analog: do your work long hand.

5. Take Breaks and Stay Hydrated. As I mentioned before, sometimes when we feel tired, we’re really just thirsty. Also, some people find they work best in 90 minute sprints, while others work best with shorter periods of focus broken up with short breaks (See: Pomodoros).

I hope this helps. Good luck out there!