new generation of fans

4

생일축하해, 넘나 이쁜 애기 혀누야!! 너 항상 웃으면 좋겠다.ㅠㅠ

Happy birthday, very lovely baby Hyunu!! I hope you can always smile. sobs

4

“It’s not the Luke from the original trilogy. It’s the Luke from the new generation.”

SW fans act like you have to demonize a filmmaker for their interpretation of a story. Rian Johnson inherited J.J. Abram’s idea of Luke exiling himself on an island. He did his best to explain why Luke disappeared. If you disagree with what he came up with like Mark Hamill did, then that’s fine and you’re entitled to your opinion. But there’s a way to be a decent human being about it like Mark is capable of doing unlike some of y'all online.

*feels* 
I thought about, how the generation would handle their newborns and couldn’t stop thinking about ‘daddy’ Kakashi helping everyone out, because…..I mean he literally grew up everyone… so he know what to do >///< (and because I miss Kakashi in the new manga *cry*)

*Thank you technology*

Oh and Hinata is on a ‘girls night’ *cough* so she isn’t there to help :P

Gorillaz.

“They say necessity is the mother of invention, but what about television? For this was the unlikely genesis for Gorillaz, the World’s Most Succesful Virtual Band.

Hewlett explains: ‘Damon and I were living together in a flat on Westbourne Grove (in London), and he bought one of the first plasma screens. It was one of those massive ones where we could watch ten channels at the same time, which we did on a big leather couch.’  The pair lost hours watching MTV in particular, which induced in them a growing frustration at what they saw as vertiginous decline in pop culture at the time.  ‘It wasn’t the videos as such, it was the bands. They were so phony and manufactured and they were so clearly playing up to it. It was almost as if in order to be a sellable commodity you had to adapt a character also. Which is fine, but why can’t they do it well? The Monkees were a manufactured band, but they were brilliant. So my question to Damon was, If it’s manufactured, why can’t people do it properly?’

And with that question hanging in the air, the duo set to work. Albarn created the music- a superb collision of musical styles which ram raided the very best chapters of the Pop Encyclopaedia, from reggae to country to psychedelia and dub. And Hewlett designed the band, a quartet of characters with outrageous back stories and outsized personalities to boot.

2D was the charismatic but vacuous frontman and keyboardist, constantly locking horns with the contemptuous bassist Murdoc Niccals. Ten year old Noodle was on guitars, and Russel Hobbs was on drums and percussion, while also possessed of the ability to channel the souls of dead rappers from a fictional hip-hop canon. Together they looked like the coolest group that (n)ever lived, making music and hanging out at the legendary HQ Kong Towers.

The characters were impeccable and the concept immaculate but, crucially, unlike other virtual pop bands such as The Archies, Gorillaz had the killer tunes to match, and soon enough this theoretical band became a very real worldwide success. Heralded by the hits ‘Clint Eastwood’ and ‘19-2000′, the eponymous debut album shot to number 3 in the UK charts, selling over five million copies worldwide. It was outdone, however, by it’s successor Demon Days, which topped the UK charts on release and ended up going platinum five times over; the third album, Plastic Beach, entered the charts at number 2. And then there was also a fourth album, The Fall, released as a free download on the Gorillaz website to fans in the Sub Division fan club. The band broke records in the US, Europe, Australia and beyond, spawned toys and clothing lines, netted Brit and MTV Awards and even, for Hewlett, a Designer of the Year Award from London’s Design Museum in 2006.

With Gorillaz, Albarn and Hewlett didn’t so much push the boundaries of what a band could be as redefine the musical landscape entirely. There is no doubt that the pair more than accomplished what they set out to do- which was to bring about a massive paradigm shift in pop music, and make it cool, credible and relevant for a new generation of impressionable young music fans.

‘That’s why we brought people like Del the Funky Homosapien, Lou Reed, Mos Def and Shaun Ryder on board… When kids like something they tend to immerse themselves in that whole world, so why not make it really cool? I like the thought of a teenager listening to Demon Days and maybe discovering Dennis Hopper and then years later, going on to track down his films. Because that’s what kids do, isn’t it?’” 


- Jamie Hewlett Artbook.

this is why hiveswap excites me

When hussie actually fuckin gives it to us, all the big gamers will do lets plays and people will watch and want to go play and you cant fully understand the game and the references in it without reading homestuck first so those people will go and read homestuck. It will become popular again. there will be a whole new generation of fans. theyll go lurk on youtube and find all the broadway karkat songs and we’ll have hundreds of newbies screaming the lyrics to karkalicious at cons. theyll go make their own cosplays and maybe now we can have more than 50 homestuck cosplayers at con meetups. theyll all go through the bucket joke phase. theyll start saying gog and jegus. theyll all swoon and drool over karkat and have fights about whether gamzee and eridan were bad characters or not. theyll all go look for faygo and tab in their local stores. we’ll have a whole new generation of homestucks doing what we used to do and im so excited for the wave of nostalgia for the 2012 homestucks who went through the first wave of it

but what excites me the most is that there will be even more new homestuck artists, fansongs, cosplayers, inside jokes, and more. there will be MORE. ntm theres gonna be new stuff relating to hiveswap too, so twice the new content from fans!! idk this stuff just really excites me because i came in late, april 2015. i missed the time when homestuck was popular. now ill finally get to experience it and it makes me so happy

hiveswap will be the homestuck fandoms resurrection i can feel it. itll be alive and well again :D

3

Want to introduce your young children to The X-Files? Look no further than The X-Files: Earth Children Are Weird, releasing on August 29 via Quirk Books. EW revealed the images above.

Illustrated by Kim Smith (Home Alone: The Classic Illustrated Storybook), the 40-page picture book is a perfect bedtime story for kids ages 4-8.

One the most beloved TV shows of all time is now a sweet, silly, sci-fi bedtime story! In The X Files: Earth Children Are Weird, best pals Dana (Scully) and Fox (Mulder) have pitched a tent in the backyard for a sleepover. But the night is full of strange sounds, lights, and shadows. Surely there’s a rational, scientific explanation for everything… or is there? With beautiful illustrations of pint-sized Dana and Fox, this humorous and not-scary-at-all story will introduce the cult TV show to an entire new generation of fans.

Confirmed majetes: TMNT 2012 will end later this year with season 5

The kid network will be rebooting its current CG “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” series as a 2D animated series with the title “Rise of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” (working title) ,  26 episodes of the 2D reboot to air starting in fall 2018.

“The Turtles is a property that has reinvention in its DNA, which keeps it fresh and relevant to every new generation while satisfying the demand from its adult fans,” said Cyma Zarghami, president, Nickelodeon Group. “’Turtles’ has been an incredibly important franchise for us since we reignited it five years ago, and we’re excited for the new series to take the characters in a different direction with more humor, a younger and lighter feel and all-new dimensions to explore.”

The new 2D series is co-executive produced by Andy Suriano (character designer for the critically acclaimed Adult Swim series “Samurai Jack”) and Ant Ward (supervising producer, current “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”) at Nickelodeon in Burbank, Calif.

https://www.yahoo.com/tv/teenage-mutant-ninja-turtles-cg-animated-series-gets-220000134.html

https://twitter.com/nickandmore/status/837423182051229696

http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/teenage-mutant-ninja-turtles-reboot-2d-1202000951/

senior groups rant

I feel like we really need to talk about this bcuz i see a lot of new fans disrespecting senior groups.All of the 3rd generation groups look up and admire 1st and 2nd generation groups.You hear a lot of idols say “i wanted to become singer when i saw xx on stage” and those are their senior groups.Senior groups made kpop what it is now thansk to their hardwork and talent,if it wasnt for them we wouldnt probably even discover kpop bcuz there’d be no hallyu wave and a lot of our faves wouldnt even choose idol career if it wasnt for them.Thats why senior groups deserve all the respect.They also went through a lot of hardships since kpop wasnt so big then.Groups like Bigbang,Wonder Girls,TVXQ and SUJU were breadwinners of their company and they made their companys the top 3 they are now.They all achieved so much and made it possible for new idols to debut safely. Senior groups built kpop with their sweat and tears,they are the reason we are all here now stanning our faves and we all should be thankful for them and respect them for all their hardwork and talent.Our faves respect them so we should respect them too,even if you dont like them or their music at least acknowledge them for everything they have done.

hiveswap discourse

honestly?? I can’t wait for a new generation of homestuck fans!! yeah, maybe they’ll be immature or ‘cringy’, maybe they’ll be over-the-top excited and not talk about anything other than homestuck for days. it’s OK for them to enjoy it just like we did

there’s still a lot of us here!! there’s already a community to take them in - cosplay mentors to remind them to seal their paint, people willing to talk to them about their theories and help them out with confusing plot stuff. we’ll read their fanfictions and draw their OCs, and they’ll appreciate all the stuff that came before them, too. imagine all the new talent they’ll bring in!!

most of all, we won’t be shitty to these kids. we have the power to make this a really great experience for them!! and honestly, new faces and a new energy to the community is always welcome. hiveswap possibly drawing in a new audience, a new era of homestuck?? I love it!!!!!!

youtube

remember dirty eyed girls?!

Examples of Dead Fandoms, Part Two

Go here to read part one.

Let me reiterate something I said before: I actually don’t want to be right about any of these fandoms being dead. It always makes me sad when people lose passion for something, and something worthwhile goes unread or unseen.


The Pulp Heroes (the Shadow, Doc Savage, etc.)

The Shadow was the first and most famous of the larger than life magazine heroes, mostly published by Street & Smith, who came out during the Great Depression. They weren’t superheroes, exactly…but they were too uncanny, too bigger than life, their adventures too bizarre and fantastical, to be typical adventurers or detective heroes in the usual sense…they were in the same ballpark as Tarzan or Zorro, a kind of “transitional fossil” between grounded detective and adventure characters, and the later far out superheroes. 

I realized the reach these novels had in their own time when I heard this amazing story about none other than jazz great Thelonious Monk: he was obsessed with Doc Savage magazine. When he performed, the jazz man sometimes had a Doc Savage magazine rolled up in his coat. I have a hard time imagining that!

The reason the pulp heroes went away and stopped having pop cultural cache is simple: the audience for it went away. You have to remember that pulp hero stories were always a composite genre, meant to appeal to two audiences simultaneously: kids, who loved action and fantasy and heroism, and working class men, who also love action, but who also loved lurid mystery and gore. To appeal to working class men, there were always way more hints of blood, gunplay, dread/terror, and sex, but because kids also read these, it was all very subdued. If you realize that pulp heroes were meant to appeal to these two very different audiences with conflicting desires, the question isn’t why the pulp heroes went away, but rather, why they lasted as long as they did. 

What took the kid audience away from the hero pulps could be summarized in two words: superhero comics. Sales on pulps fell every year when they had to compete with comics, and the history of the pulp heroes in the 1940s is defined by their reaction to the challenge of comics, a little like the history of movies when they had to compete with television. 

There were three big reactions to comics in the 1940s from the pulp magazines: 

  1. They dissed comics. This reminds me of the 50s movies that called television “the idiot’s lantern.” The best example of this I can find is the Doc Savage mystery, The Whisker of Hercules. By all accounts, Doc Savage author Lester Dent hated, hated, hated comic superheroes, particularly Superman, who exaggerated the traits of his own heroes beyond what he felt an audience would believe. Whisker of Hercules is a novel where Doc finds criminals who who take a potion that turns them into Superman, gives them superstrength, the ability to leap tall buildings in a single bound, and the ability to move at superspeed, but in the end, they are ultimately bested by Doc Savage, who outsmarts them and reveals the Whisker of Hercules ages them to death. Lester Dent, you see, felt superhero comics were a passing fad without staying power.
  2. They created characters that were both in pulp magazines and in comics as well. An example of this would be Ka-Zar and Sheena, who was in both comics and pulp magazines simultaneously. Today, we’d call them “multimedia properties.”
  3. They created far-out pulp heroes that were aimed at a kid audience to lure kids back to magazines. The best example of this is Edmond Hamilton’s Captain Future, which was a pulp hero who was extremely kid-friendly, with robot sidekicks and a cute mouse pet, and a base on the Moon. 

While the kids who read pulp heroes were lured away by comics, the working class men were pulled away by a new invention: the “men’s adventure” paperback novel, which could have explicit sex and violence. James Bond (Casino Royale was first published in 1954) was more typical of the paperback heroes, as was gun-toting Mack Bolan the Executioner, a special forces guy who came back from Vietnam to find his family killed by the mafia, and who declares war on the mob with his special forces training and arsenal of firearms (he also directly inspired a certain Marvel Comics character you might be familiar with). 

Just like almost all pop music is either Beatles or Stones inspired, nearly all men’s adventure heroes are some variation of either James Bond or Mack Bolan. This leads us to today, where men’s adventure novels are either porn, or gun porn. If you’ve read this blog long enough, you can probably guess which one I like better.

Here’s another thing to consider when wondering why the pulp heroes went away. The Shadow, Doc Savage, the Spider, are really only a few years older than the superheroes. They were not separated by a geologic age, the way many histories lead you to believe: they came out in the same decade as each other. Doc Savage came out in 1933, and Superman came out in 1938, which is not really that much time difference at all. The difference may be that there is a publishing company (DC Comics) that views Superman and Batman as essential to their identity and that keeps them alive for that reason, whereas no company does that for the pulp characters. In fact, there was even some dispute early this century as to whether the Street & Smith characters fell into the public domain. 


Original Battlestar Galactica

I used to post old cosplay pics, and my gosh, were there ever a lot of OBSG images. The actor who played Boomer was a regular at early science fiction conventions (there was a time when it was considered unusual for celebrities to visit conventions), and when a new BSG show was announced in 2003 (believe it or not, there was once a time that a hard reboot of an old scifi property was rare), it led to one of the all-time biggest nerdrages in nerd history.

I hesitate to say this, but part of the reason that Star Trek and the Next Generation are discovered decades later by new fans is because they really are good shows, and OBSG is…well, it’s a challenge for a new person, with fresh eyes, to see just what got everyone so excited in 1978. The reason why BSG was a big deal is clear: most people who are fans of it are fans because they watched the show when they were children, so it’s imprinted in their minds (rather like 90s kids and “Saved by the Bell” or “Power Rangers”). OSBG fandom isn’t growing for the same reason that “Saved by the Bell” fans aren’t growing: it’s a product of hormones and nostalgia, you “had to be there” to get it. 

To me, this explains perfectly why people went ballistic when a BSG reboot was announced back in the stone age, 2002. For one, the concept of a reboot was so new that I remember I heard people wonder if this means their favorite characters from the original were dead now. More importantly, though, this is a fandom with a few core people who remember BSG from when they were kids, and therefore have strong feelings about why it works and doesn’t work. 


Prince Valiant

Here’s a test to determine if a fandom is dead: if a movie adaptation royally screws everything about it up, would people get angry and yelly and passionate? Remember how people got death threats over the M. Knight Shyamalan Last Airbender? Well, in the case of Prince Valiant, I don’t think anybody would actually care. This is surprising, because for years, when people thought of comics, they thought of Prince Valiant: he was emblematic of an entire medium. Years before the prestige of Maus, Persepolis, and the “graphic novel,” it was the one comic that was classy, that adults were alright reading. 

Why is it no longer popular? Well, copy and paste everything I said on Dick Tracy about newspaper comics here. But also, if you ever run into someone who really loved Prince Valiant back in the day, ask them why they liked it. The answer should be incredibly telling. Most likely, they’ll tell you they loved the beautiful art, that they loved the great style of Hal Foster’s godlike pen. They loved the sweep of the story and the epic feel. 

Here’s what they won’t say if you ask them: they probably won’t say they liked the characters. (I can’t think of one adjective to describe Prince Valiant’s personality - he totally fails the RedLetterMedia test). They won’t remember any moment that made them cry or made them feel a rush of triumph.

I swear, it is not my intention to be a hater and drink some haterade. That’s really not in my nature, because I am a positive person. The whole point of this blog is for me to share cool old stuff I love - negativity has no place here. But there’s a dishonesty, a willful obtuseness, in trying to understand why Prince Valiant stopped being a phenomenon, and not realizing that Prince Valiant is beautiful looking, but it doesn’t give us the things about stories that “stick to our ribs” and make it stand the test of time: great characters and memorable, earned moments. Praising a comic for having beautiful art is like praising a movie for the great special effects. You don’t want the one thing people to remember about your hero to be a haircut. 


John Carter of Mars

The fandom for John Carter of Mars is a little like Barsoom itself without the Atmosphere Factory and water pumped from the depths of Omean: dead.

To the modern eye, one of the weirdest parts of Carl Sagan’s Cosmos series is the 3 minute digression in the episode on Mars where Sagan starts talking about how he was the hugest John Carter of Mars fanboy ever, and how he dreamed of rescuing beautiful women in gallant swordfights on thoatback, with his fanboy narration intercut with shots of Frazetta and Michael Whelan cover art. This really happened. And this was typical of the kind of passion that John Carter of Mars inspired that you don’t see much of today. It’s so easy to blame the tanking of the movie adaptation, but the movie failing was a symptom, not a cause, of the fact there was no hungry audience to receive it.

Sagan was a huge John Carter fan: his car had a “BARSOOM” vanity license plate, and he wasn’t alone: without hesitation, I would say that Edgar Rice Burroughs was the most important and influential scifi writer of the first few decades of the 20th Century, so important that everyone defined themselves as either Burroughs-like (Leigh Brackett, for instance) or rejected the tropes ERB created (see: Stanley G. Weinbaum). John Carter of Mars didn’t inspire Star Wars. Instead, he inspired the things that inspired Star Wars (e.g. Flash Gordon). Edgar Rice Burroughs, not Faulkner, not Hemmingway, was the best selling novelist of the 1920s. 

Remember the last time I did this, and I was sincerely baffled why the Tripods novels have not had a revival? Well, when I got to John Carter of Mars, the answer came to me: the reason is that this work was so influential, so ubiquitous, that it has been strip-mined of creative power by imitators to the point that very little about it seems original anymore. Tripods, if it came out now, would just look like a Hunger Games rip-off despite the fact that if anything, it’s the other way around. The problem with John Carter of Mars is exactly the same: remember how the response to the trailer to the film adaptation was that this was Avatar Goes to Attack of the Clones? When, actually, Avatar and others got a lot from the Barsoom books. In other words, because John Carter was influential enough to create cliches, paradoxically, it is now seen as cliche.


Highlander

The Ghostbusters reboot had a big, big problem: it’s a remake of a movie that’s an untouchable classic, like Back to the Future. Any remake would inevitably be compared to the original and suffer in the comparison. Well, here’s one movie you could probably remake with a gender swap hero: Highlander. It’s not Back to the Future, Jaws, or Terminator; this isn’t a movie people can quote every line from. People know of Highlander, sure…people know things like the Queen song, “there can be only one,” electric swordfighting, etc, but people don’t actually care that much. People won’t go ballistic. Highlander is a remaker’s dream: it has enough name recognition to get sold and made, but it doesn’t have a legion of nitpicking nerd fans to second guess everything and treat the original like gospel.

Highlander used to be kind of a big deal: it had not one but two tv shows, and it had three movie sequels. Just like “Wild Wild West” was steampunk a couple decades before that term existed, Highlander was “urban fantasy” before that term existed. Because of the themes of urban fantasy and tragic romance, it always had a strong female fandom, and there’s no understanding Highlander without understanding that it was kind of the Supernatural of its day: theoretically, with its swordfighting and cool powers, it was trying to appeal to boys…but ended up building up a way bigger female audience instead. 

Posterity is really never kind to any fantasy property who’s audience is primarily women. Who, today, talks a lot about Gargoyles or Beauty and the Beast, for example, to pick two properties that used to have a strong fandom? The last one (B&B) is pretty amazing because it was created by two people immensely relevant to the zeitgeist of today: Ron Perlman (the Beast himself), and the show’s head writer and producer, a fellow by the name of George R.R. Martin. It could be just plain chauvinism over a “girl thing.” I don’t deny that plays a role, more likely, it could just be that scifi fans are immensely nerdy in a way fantasy fans aren’t, so they keep alive their favorite scifi artifacts. That, I think, is why we’re still talking about Terminator and not Highlander: Tolkien fans who write in Dwarf runes are a freakish exception. In general, fantasy fans are way less hardcore than scifi fans.


Magnus, Robot Fighter

Ever talk to any old gay nerds? They will usually tell you they realized they were hella gay because of three men: Robert Conrad in “Wild Wild West,” Ultra Boy from Legion of Super-Heroes, and Magnus, Robot Fighter.

Russ Manning’s Magnus, Robot Fighter may be one of the great subterranean sources of pop culture. Matt Groening admits that the aesthetics of this comic inspired a lot of Futurama. Magnus, Robot Fighter was such a nostalgia totem in the minds of the Baby Boom generation, on the level of the Mars Attacks! cards, that George Lucas, who was always very hands-off with supplementary material, personally requested Russ Manning come out of retirement to do the Star Wars daily comics.

Magnus, Robot Fighter is an interesting example of how comics only have cache and longevity long-term if they can successfully convert into other media formats. Comics are important, but comics are ephemeral. Superman is the king of comic characters, sure, but most people know about him because he made the leap from comics to radio, screen, and television. 

Magnus is all the more heartbreaking because he almost made the jump to a medium with durability - video games. Under circumstances too complex to relate here, Acclaim bought out all the Gold Key comic characters, and Magnus was generally considered to be the crown jewel of the lot. Because Magnus was too important an IP to screw up, and the development team was so inexperienced, Acclaim instead decided to make their first Gold Key game adaptation one of the minor guys, so if they blew it, no biggie: Turok, Dinosaur Hunter. The rest is history: Acclaim was so busy making sequels to the surprise hit Turok, Dinosaur Hunter they never got around to giving Magnus, Robot Fighter a game.

Part three is coming, so stay tuned. Believe it or not, I actually have a fandom from the past ten years on here! Can you think of any dead fandoms?

I hate to see kpop fans calling some groups flops for not doing well in charts or not selling many albums or for not being super popular. They are still a group that have fans. And unlike some new generation kpop fans, not every fandom or group only cares about numbers or how well they do. Sometimes it’s just about bringing out good music or meeting your fans/idol. You’re not more of a fan for stanning a popular group, and your group is not better just because they do better. Not everything is always about success. Sometimes it’s just about the feelings.

witchoil  asked:

sending this as an ask so that you can reply at your leisure, but i'm really curious about how you feel about/take the line, "and I will not be the last of the Jedi." either from a storytelling/analytical perspective or even personal preference. to put it mildly, I struggle with it because it seems to undercut the otherwise coherent thematic reevaluation that happens in the third act of TLJ. less mildly, it makes me want to smack my face into the nearest flat surface.

I actually really loved that line. (The Last Jedi spoilers)

(as you already know, and forgive me for talking out loud to order my thoughts) the whole movie, director and Star Wars fan since childhood Rian Johnson is asking the audience really grossly meta questions about Star Wars as a collective intergenerational cultural experience. He’s asking the audience whether Star Wars has inveterate, unmovable qualities that it MUST have to BE Star Wars, asking the audience what their nostalgia means to them, asking the audience if Star Wars can be dynamic, or if their nostalgia makes it impossible to both enjoy Star Wars and be surprised by it. 

Rian Johnson is asking us if we’d be ok if we wanted to watch a movie that was more than just a rehash of the old, if this time the characters didn’t have their hands chopped off in the second movie, if the characters didn’t turn out to be secretly related, if there was no legacy, if it was more than just a collection of movie references to the original trilogy. He’s asking if our experience would be ruined if Luke Skywalker was a dynamic character and not a myth from the 70’s. Woud it be ruined if Star Wars didn’t have a lightsaber fight? (The Last Jedi does not  actually have a lightsaber-on-lightsaber fight - no two lightsabers physically strike each other in this movie!). Would Star Wars be ruined if Star Wars didn’t have any Jedi? Does Star Wars need the Force? What makes Star Wars work?

Ben Solo/Kylo Ren takes the metatextual stance of just throwing everything we know about Star Wars away. “Let the past die. Kill it if you have to. That’s the only way to become what you are meant to be. It’s time to let old things die. Snoke, Skywalker. The Sith, the Jedi, the Rebels… Let it all die.” Let our preconceptions about Star Wars die, let nostalgia and old ties die. out with the old, in with the new. A story must have surprises.

By the end of the movie, we see Ben Solo brought to his knees by nostalgia/realizing that nostalgia and the ties that bind him (and the audience to the Star Wars series) are important. “[Luke Skywalker and Han Solo] will always be with you,” he’s told. So, Ben’s burn-it-all-down answer is not exactly what Rian is looking for or entirely agrees with. A story must have connection, and nostalgia is one of the biggest selling points to Star Wars.

Specifically about the flawed concept of the Jedi and whether it belongs in Star Wars, we get Rian’s answer through the interactions between Rey, Luke and Yoda.

Keep reading