nevada test

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Which airframe carries more aesthetic appeal? Personally I prefer Old School.

[1] An F-15 fighter jet, assigned to the 433rd Weapons Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kevin Tanenbaum, 10 JUL 2017.)

[2] F-22 Raptors and an F-15 fighter jets, assigned to the 433rd Weapons Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryn Murphy, 10 JUL 2017.)

[3] An F-35 Lightning II fighter jet, assigned to the 6th Weapons Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kevin Tanenbaum, 10 JUL 2017.)

The United States Air Force Weapons School, held at Nevada Test and Training Range, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, teaches graduate-level instructor courses that provide the world’s most advanced training in weapons and tactics employment to officers of the combat air forces and mobility air forces.

Radiation in the real Mojave Wasteland

Before I get into the details you should know that the majority of the radiation that fell across the Mojave is gone by now. However that does not mean there are not still pockets of it left and of course uranium mines and so on. 

Post WWII the US wanted to test as many bombs as possible to see what the effects were in all sorts of conditions, depths, heights and so on. At the time the most sparsely populated place in the US was in Southern Nevada. This was when Las Vegas was just beginning to come into it’s own and I-15 to Los Angeles had not even been constructed yet.

Here is a map of the Nevada Test Range

And here is what the most heavily cratered part of it looks like

The majority of those detonations were underground however the site had been used for above ground and aerial detonation also. 

All of the material blasted into the atmosphere had to go somewhere and one of the biggest air currents in the area goes from the ocean through Los Angeles and into central Utah. It covers the majority of the Mojave desert and of course that material was blown directly into it. 

Here is a map of the three heaviest effected regions in the states of Nevada, Utah and Arizona

My Grandfather was living in St George Utah at the time having retired from the Army post WWII and he, with his wife and five kids were all subjected to the fallout from Nuclear blasts in Nevada. My mother and uncles did not develop problems from it but my Grandmother had lung cancer in her later years and my Grandfather had a variety of health problems from a weak immune system in his 50′s until his death in his 80′s. What they experienced was a very real concern that many people in the area experienced and it was not until the late 1980′s that a real solid investigation on the effects of being down wind of the blasts had. 

The Radioactive Fallout lost the majority of its Radioactivity within a few years but there are hot spots dotting the Mojave where sediment has collected since the testing being washed down river or through floods and they measure a higher radiation than normal. None of them are particularly lethal, you’d have to spend a few months on them to get a high enough dose to matter but it is a concern for the smaller species in the area that do have to deal with it. 

The other problem we face out here are the hundreds of Uranium Mines all over the desert. I’ve talked a lot about them before but many of these mines had no regulation on them and people just dug wherever they could and contaminated the surrounding area. Uranium itself does not have too much Radioactivity unless you detonate it and those fine fallout particles settle however it’s a heavy metal and will leech into the soil and water table like mercury will. I was poisoned by Uranium when I inhaled a lot of fine ore dust over the period of a few hours as I napped on a fine tailings pile of sand. I had to be treated with Iodine and have my system flushed and it took a bit before I was back to normal. I had a representative from Utah’s Mining Regulation tell me that for every known Uranium mine there are probably two they don’t know about. The ones that are particularly dangerous have been sealed off like the one in the photo below. 

It’s just a fact of life out here in the Mojave. The mutation rate from what I have seen is no higher than normal. We do get mutations in animals every so often but you get that all across the US.

So when people say I am only playing at Fallout and I’m obsessed with it they don’t really get that I actually live it. I live in the most heavily nuclear bombed area in the world. At one point just about everyone living down here in the 50′s was exposed to high levels of fallout. I’ve been exposed to Uranium. I also scrap, scavenge, spelunk, hunt, trap and survive off the land. I was doing this long before the Fallout games even existed and They just over exaggerated a part of my life. New Vegas in particular since it takes place in my home region. 

Sometimes reality is just as messed up as fiction. 

‘Rope tricks’ are seen in this image of a nuclear explosion taken less than one millisecond after detonation. During operation Tumbler-Snapper in 1952, this nuclear test device was suspended 300 feet above the Nevada desert floor, and anchored by mooring cables. As the ball of plasma expanded, the radiating energy superheated and vaporized the cables just ahead of the fireball, resulting in the ‘spike’ effects. (Dept of Defense image via The Atlantic)

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Atomic Annie — The M65 Atomic Cannon,

Designed in 1949 by the American Engineer Robert Schwarz, the M65 “Atomic Annie” was inspired by German railway guns used during World War II.  The M65 however, was designed to deliver a nuclear payload to its target.  The gun and carriage itself weighed around 85 tons, was manned by a crew of 5-7, and was transported by two specially designed towing tractors.  At 280mm in caliber and capable of firing a projectile over 20 miles, the gun was certainly powerful enough as a conventional weapon, but the Atomic Annie was certainly no conventional weapon.  In 1953 it was tested for the first time at the Nevada Test Site, where it fired a 15 kiloton nuclear warhead, creating a blast similar in size to the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  

After the successful test, 20 M65 cannons were produced for the US Army and deployed in Europe and Korea.  They were almost always in constant motion so the Soviets never knew where they were and could not target them.  While an interesting weapon, the Atomic Annie suffered from limited range, especially after the development of ballistic missiles which could strike a target from thousands of miles away.  The last M65 Atomic Cannon was retired in 1963.  Today only 8 survive, and are displayed in museums across the country.

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Heaven Or Las Vegas

July 7, 2017

Gridding Las Vegas with orgonite has proven to be an even larger job than we thought. Portland, Oregon has now been dethroned as the city with the most cell towers we’ve ever seen. It just did not let up here for a second. We were constantly pulling over and making u-turns to bust towers. The land is already scorched and destroyed beyond belief, and the amount of towers ensures that it stays that way, until now.

This was our first step into the territory and today we conservatively busted 150 cell towers. The energetic impact could be felt more than seen at first. The skies were transmuting from the time we awoke even before we distributed anything. But as we went, the oppressive atmosphere actually lightened up. How do we know it’s working energetically? We feel better. It’s not something that can always be measured. If we can’t trust our own bodies and minds, who can we trust? Those who are not attuned to their own body’s energy, often are upset by the idea that orgone energy cannot be measured with an instrument. If you live without wireless technology and have a lot of orgonite around you, you’ll quickly gain the ability to feel what we feel every day.

The work was enough to attract four black helicopters, which were flying together in a large circle near where we were working in the late afternoon. It was slightly unnerving, but there wasn’t anything they could do except psych us out. At the end of the daylight, we completed our mission of gifting and blessing the Vanguard on Fremont Street, where Luis Campos was killed with one punch, completely unprovoked, by a mind controlled psychopath back in April. He was the husband of a friend we’ve known for years, who is left a widow with their two little children. When we arrived at the Vanguard, we saw several building top cell tower arrays beaming right at it. Immediately after the gifting, the black helicopters were back, and this time they flew one after another over us. At this point, it was getting dark and we were glad to call it a day.

The energy in Las Vegas is absolutely unbearable. I don’t know how human beings live here. It is pure death. The fact that anyone survives here is testament to the strength of the human organism. I feel that the nuclear blasts at the Nevada test site just decades ago have left their mark on this place, and with scorching temperatures that don’t even cool off at night, there is definitely a lot of healing that will need to be done in this wasteland. It remains a mystery how anyone can partake of entertainment and material delights here when the very environment around them is deteriorating beyond recognition. This was once a green land, with trees larger than we can imagine. One day it will be green again, and the parasites will no longer be able to harvest the negative energy of oppressed human beings.

The day ended as it always does, with spiraling vortexes of orgone energy, pristine, unpolluted skies, and pure white orgonite clouds. If this can happen in Las Vegas, then the entire Earth can be restored.

@korolevx

That’s not larping, that’s literal.  I live in a place that still has pockets of radioactivity from fallout. 

https://mojave-wasteland-official.tumblr.com/post/162717820204/radiation-in-the-real-mojave-wasteland

https://mojave-wasteland-official.tumblr.com/post/163193813504/the-mojave-movie-that-killed-john-wayne-with

My grandparents and parents were exposed to nuclear fallout from the Nevada test site. I was exposed to Uranium from a mine.