neuromimetic

Neuromimetic processor board beats supercomputers at their own game

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Neuromorphic chips were first developed by Carver Mead at Caltech back in the late ’80s. He made many of the most significant advances to date in analog VLSI, and also later developed a low-power silicon retina. One of his students, Kwabena Boahen, continued work on the silicon retina and was able to mimic many features of real retinas including luminance adaptation and contrast gain control. Neuromorphic computing designs have yet to compete with traditional computing architectures, which continue to impress. For instance, IBM announced this past November that its Blue Gene/Q Sequoia supercomputer could clock 16 quadrillion calculations per second, and could crudely simulate more than 530 billion neurons. What they did not advertise though, is that to do this, Blue Gene consumes nearly 8 megawatts, enough to power 160,000 homes. Boahen has now developed a new computing platform he calls Neurogrid, that runs around 100,000 times more efficiently. Each Neurogrid board, running at 5 watts, can simulate detailed neuronal activity of one million neurons — and it can now do it in real time. (via Neuromimetic processor board beats supercomputers at their own game | ExtremeTech)