nerve regeneration

Things they don’t tell you about top surgery

- Talk to the surgeon about the size you want your new areolas/nipples (don’t be afraid to ask)

- Numbness. No one talks about this for guys who are about to have surgery. You’re going to be numb all in your chest area, especially where the incisions were. They cut nerves as they pass along your chest, and it can take up to a year to regenerate those nerves. Still, feels super foreign for the first two weeks

- Make your bed into a pillow chair, body pillow, two on each side, and two for your head. 

- Sleep alone. I tried to sleep with my girlfriend and it was miserable. You really do need the entire bed for yourself

- Go on Groupon, & get yourself a 10 foot lightning cable iPhone charger, BEST THING EVER, can reach from wherever you are

- Don’t take a week off from work, take two. You will regret the one week, and love the extra time

- When they say “don’t move too much, even after the first week”. LISTEN. I moved way too much and got so sore super quickly. 

- Drink lots of water & eat if your taking the pain medication, otherwise your stomach feels super funky.

- Get stool softeners, & don’t be afraid to take those babies. Don’t wait a week to poop. you’ll surely regret it. 

- The drains are scary & they may hurt while draining or rewrapping your dressings, but once they come out, the second they do, its no more pain, its crazy. 

i hope this helps someone, because i wish i knew all of this when i was having mine a month ago. Looking back its like everyone forgets all the real negatives, its a great experience, & i healed very well & quick compared to most, but the first few days are crazy. They hurt, suck but it gets better. 

  • Patroclus: Worsening pain could actually be a good thing, it means the nerves might be regenerating
  • Achilles: Could be good could be bad thanks for the differential... are there any other options?
  • Patroclus: Have you ever considered a career path as a motivational speaker?
  • Patroclus: Why don't you check out some rehab?
  • Achilles: I did the rehab thing
  • Patroclus: One session... And you didn't even finish that session
  • Achilles: The guy wanted me to visualize the healing. I can do that at home.
Science in Naruto
  • Eye and arm transplants - nerve regeneration - Madara, Obito, Danzo
  • Reconnecting limbs and severed torsos
  • The statistic for a person’s chances of surviving the curse seal is 1/10. This was determined after a grand total of ten people were administered with the seal.
  • Shizune transmutated Neji’s hair into tissue for his vital organs.
  • Kabuto blending a mixture to inject into himself.
  • Through his various experiments, Orochimaru lost his human body and became something that resembles the morphing of several white snakes. He has gained resistance to many poisons and amazing healing abilities. He lost his limbs.
  • Sasori is a human puppet with only a live beating heart. The heart is needed to produce chakra. Why does he not require any other organs? How does his heart gain nutrients to sustain itself and continue producing chakra?
  • Zaku was able to use his arms despite having pipes running through them.
  • Kushina, Minato and Tsunade can manage movement with their spines severed
  • Kushina and Minato are able to speak despite a large portion of their torso being destroyed.
  • Blood loss means little. The five Kages were severely injured. 
  • Iryo ninjutsu heals wounds and is later able to provide the user with chakra,

How the Brain Avoids Blurry Vision

by Lisa Marie Potter, Inside Science

Thank goodness for autostabilization, the digital camera feature that compensates for movement to achieve that crystal-clear, spontaneous selfie. But even more importantly in daily life, our eyes have an ancient form of autostabilization that prevents the world from blurring by. Skinny nerve cells called axons connecting the eye and the brain trigger tiny eye movements that stabilize our field of vision.

For the first time, scientists have identified the molecules that make sure these axons are wired to the exact regions of the brain. The findings could help us understand eye movement disorders and could one day help regenerate damaged nerve cells to restore sight.

Two complementary studies published May 7 in Neuron focused on nerve cells that correct for slow movements in specific directions: One paper focused on the horizontal direction and the other on the vertical direction.

Keep reading

Discovery may help nerve regeneration in spinal injury

Scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Glasgow have uncovered a possible new method of enhancing nerve repair in the treatment of spinal cord injuries.

It is known that scar tissue, which forms following spinal cord injury, creates an impenetrable barrier to nerve regeneration, leading to the irreversible paralysis associated with spinal injuries. Scientists at Liverpool and Glasgow have discovered that long-chain sugars, called heparan sulfates, play a significant role in the process of scar formation in cell models in the laboratory.

Research findings have the potential to contribute to new strategies for manipulating the scarring process induced in spinal cord injury and improving the effectiveness of cell transplantation therapies in patients with this type of injury.

Scarring occurs due to the activation, change in shape, and stiffness of cells, called astrocytes, which are the major nerve support cells in the spinal cord. One possible way to repair nerve damage is transplantation of support cells from peripheral nerves, called Schwann cells. The team, however, found that these cells secrete heparan sulfate sugars, which promote scarring reactions and could reduce the effectiveness of nerve repair.

Scientists showed that these sugars can over-activate protein growth factors that promote astrocyte scarring. Significantly, however, they found this over-activation could be inhibited by chemically modified heparins made in the laboratory. These compounds could prevent the scarring reaction of astrocyte cells, opening up new opportunities for treatment of damaged nerve cells.

Professor Jerry Turnbull, from the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Integrative Biology, said: “Spinal injury is a devastating condition and can result in paralysis for life. The sugars we are investigating are produced by nearly every cell in the body, and are similar to the blood thinning drug heparin.

"We found that some sugar types promote scarring reaction, but remarkably other types, which can be chemically produced in the laboratory by modifying heparin, can prevent this in our cell models.

"Studies in animal cells are now needed, but the exciting thing about this work is that it could, in the future, provide a way of developing treatments for improving nerve repair in patients, using the body’s own Schwann cells, supplemented with specific sugars.”

Professor Sue Barnett, from the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, said: “We had already shown that Schwann cells, identified as having the potential to promote nerve regrowth, induced scarring in spinal cord injury. Now that we know that they secrete these complex sugars, which lead to scarring, we have the opportunity to intervene in this process, and promote central nervous system repair.”

Study sheds light on role of exercise and androgens such as testosterone on nerve damage repair

A study by researchers from Emory University and Indiana University found that the beneficial effects daily exercise can have on the regeneration of nerves also require androgens such as testosterone in both males and females. It is the first report of both androgen-dependence of exercise on nerve regeneration and of an androgenic effect of exercise in females.

“The findings will provide a basis for the development of future treatment strategies for patients suffering peripheral nerve injuries,” said Dale Sengelaub, professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at IU. “And they underscore the need to tailor those treatments differently for men and women.”

The researchers discussed the study on Monday at the Neuroscience 2012 scientific meeting in New Orleans.

Injuries to peripheral nerves are common. Hundreds of thousands of Americans are victims of traumatic injuries each year, and non-traumatic injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are found in even higher numbers. The researchers previously showed that two weeks of moderate daily exercise substantially improves regeneration of cut nerves and leads to functional recovery in mice, though different types of exercise are required to produce the effect in males and females. They now report that these beneficial effects of exercise require androgens such as testosterone in both males and females.

In the study they conducted, they exercised three groups of male and female mice. Nerves of the three groups were cut and surgically repaired. Once group received the drug flutamide, which blocks the androgen receptor. A second group received a placebo treatment. The third group was unexercised. Regenerating nerve fibers in the placebo group grew to more than twice the length of those in unexercised mice in both males and females. In flutamide-treated mice, the effects of exercise were blocked completely in both sexes.

The Society of Neuroscience is promoting the study (“Enhancement of peripheral axon regeneration by exercise requires androgen receptor signaling in both male and female mice”) to media covering the conference as a “Hot Topic.”