neo nouveau

I like solarpunk because it’s hopeful. I like solarpunk because it’s optimistic. I like solarpunk because it’s inclusive. I like solarpunk because in a world full of bad news and pessimism and corrupt systems, it suggests that maybe - if we work together, if we organise and cooperate and support one another - we can build something better than we have now. We can turn aside the broken machine that’s been dragging us inexorably towards the brink for our entire lives. We can do things, we can change things, we can have a voice. Solarpunk’s idealism is a feature, not a flaw.

I want us to start living a more solarpunk life right now. We don’t have to wait for artificial intelligence or nanotechnology or cold fusion or FTL travel. We can use what we have in this moment, even if it’s just our wits and resolve, to move in a better direction. Put solar panels on your roof. Collect rainwater. Volunteer. Make your own compost. Plant flowers for bees. Talk to your neighbours. Grow your own food. Do something.

It doesn’t matter if people are attracted to solarpunk by the aesthetics or the fashions - it’s a gateway, and it encourages exploration, investigation, imagination. Someone starts out being intrigued by elegant neo-nouveau clothing and architecture, and from there they can find out about solar power, about guerilla gardening, about permaculture and sustainable living, about activism and collectivism.

I want people to tell solarpunk stories. I want people to imagine solarpunk societies and systems and strategies. I want people to think, “How could I make this more solarpunk?”. I want solarpunk to become mainstream, because the more people we have thinking about these beautiful solar-powered utopias - and about how to get there from here - the better chance we have of walking that path before it’s too late.