neil-boyd

In virtually every nation-state men compromise more than 90% of those found guilty of murder. The primary methods used to kill differ, however. In Canada about 30% or more of all homicides are committed with firearms and another 30% or so with knives; a further 20% are the consequence of beatings; and a final 10% are strangulations and suffocations. In the United States a little more than 60% of homicides are committed with firearms, and the remaining deaths come from a mix of knifings, beatings, strangulations, and suffocations; as in Canada, knifings and beatings are more common than strangulations and suffocations.
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Boyd, Neil. “The Beast Within: Why Men Are Violent.” Greystone Books; Douglas & McIntye Publishing Group. (p. 71)

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im at the library and there was a little section on feminism so naturally i got excited and looked through it and this book was on display i’m????? its literally just a man whining and crying about ~*~ evil feminists~*~ BETRAYING the fight for sexual equality gross

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Neil Boyd Shoots Smithfield's Chicken 'N Barbecue

Raleigh, North Carolina-based advertising and editorial portrait, food, product and architecture photographer Neil Boyd comes to PhotoServe this month with some fabulous looking barbecue food imagery. Boyd recently did a four-day shoot for the large chain Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Barbecue. (Continue Reading)

New Mexico Police Officers to Stand Trial for Murder of Homeless Man

New Mexico Police Officers to Stand Trial for Murder of Homeless Man

Albuquerque police officer Dominique Perez, left, and former Albuquerque Detective Keith Sandy stand up in court at a preliminary hearing in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 3. They are facing murder charges for the death of James Boyd, who was shot during a standoff in March 2014 in the foothills of the Sandia Mountains. (PHOTO CREDIT: Russell Contreras/AP) A New Mexico judge on Tuesday ordered…

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Evolutionary psychologists and biologists argue that male violence is like the dark moth or the peacock’s tail. In the absence of social constraints, violent men are more likely to impregnate women than non-violent men are, more likely to reproduce, and thus more likely to ensure the survival of violence as a social strategy within the species.
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Boyd, Neil. “The Beast Within: Why Men Are Violent.” Greystone Books; Douglas & McIntye Publishing Group. (p. 48)

Archaeological evidence tells us that male Homo sapiens have always been violent; the written record of the past five thousand years confirms this consistent pattern of behavior. From the archaeological record of nomadic peoples to the written records of the Sumerians of Mesopotamia, Athenian Greece, the Roman Empire, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, up to the global empires and the world wars of the recent past, male violence has been a ubiquitous underpinning of political and social organization.
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Boyd, Neil. “The Beast Within: Why Men Are Violent.” Greystone Books; Douglas & McIntye Publishing Group. (p. 40)

The Romans, who established at least a rudimentary form of democracy, permitted fathers to exile, torture, and kill their children. Edward Gibbon reports in ‘The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire’ that men were never punished and were sometimes praised for such killings.
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Boyd, Neil. “The Beast Within: Why Men Are Violent.” Greystone Books; Douglas & McIntye Publishing Group. (p. 42)

As societies have become larger and more complex, the extent of male violence has concomitantly increased. The simplest form of living arrangement, which began in our evolutionary past, was the band of primates…Violence among kin was relatively common, and it still is among gorillas, chimpanzees, and orangutans that live in the world…The human band expanded and evolved into the tribe when a hospitable climate, farming, and the herding of animals made fixed settlements possible…The tribe gradually evolved into what anthropologists and others have termed a chiefdom, a collection of thousands of individuals, often ruled by a hereditary chief with centralized political power. …In many parts of the world, the chiefdom and the early state society have typically evolved into the most common of our current forms of political organization, the modern state.
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Boyd, Neil. “The Beast Within: Why Men Are Violent.” Greystone Books; Douglas & McIntye Publishing Group. (p. 40 - 42)