need to replace

anonymous asked:

any skin care tips/products?

  • drink at least 1.5 - 2 litres of water a day
  • use rosewater as a toner. it has so many benefits.  
  • wash your pillowcases regularly to prevent break outs.
  • do NOT use coconut oil as a moisturiser; it’s comedogenic, which means it clogs pores.
  • always apply sunscreen to your face (even if you’re brown) as it lessens the chance of sunspots and deepening already existing pigmentation. 
  • lush ultrabalm is a really good multi-use product! you can use it to heal tattoos, as a lipbalm or to ease dry elbows. i like to apply it to my eyebrows for a naturally done-ish eyebrow look when i’m not wearing makeup. 
  • always double cleanse at night; one time to remove any excess makeup and residue and another time to deep cleanse.
  • exfoliate. i recommend a chemical exfoliation! you can do these at home with dr. dennis gross alpha beta peel ($$) or even the pixi glow tonic to-go exfoliating toner pads.
  • the makeup eraser is a great makeup remover, also eco-friendly. just use water! (although you still need to cleanse afterwards and not ideal for travelling). 
  • DON’T put your face directly towards the shower head when showering, esp if you have sensitive skin. It can irritate capillaries.
  • if you’re looking for a good skincare tool, use a konjac sponge! keep in mind they need to be replaced regularly.
  • wash your makeup brushes regularly! i recommend at least spraying them with brush cleaner after every use. especially with your foundation brushes, as foundation gets caked in and is much harder to get out when you’re washing it!
  • use oils. even if you’re oily. but figure out you skin type first!
  • once you have, check out this article by byrdie for a guide to skincare for every skin type.
  • don’t put these things on your face.
  • invest in your skincare, or if you can’t, at least go for a more natural alternative. some semi-affordable skincare brands i love are pixi, the ordinary and sukin. 
  • use a face mask once a week! i recommend a dry clay mask (one you have to mix with water to activate) because it contains less to no preservatives and is often much more better your skin.
  • charcoal is a great ingredient found in skincare that can help draw out bacteria, dirt etc from your skin. 
Important things I learnt at my PhD induction
  • It is not a failure to complete a PhD and then leave academia. It isn’t a failure to complete one thing that usually leads to something specific, and to say that you actually don’t want to continue down that common path. Success comes with completing the thing you set out to do, or tacking it to the best of your ability. What you do after that is entirely up to you, and it doesn’t have to be the proscribed outcome.
  • You don’t have to justify your field of study, your choice of topic, or even your choice to embark upon a PhD, to anyone but yourself. If your friends and family are confused or disapproving of your decision, you don’t need to accept their attitude. If they tell you that you should be working full time instead, or doing a different topic, or whatever, you can tell them that they’re wrong. You are doing this for you. As long as you want to be doing this, you should do it. 
  • Your PhD is not your life. You should take holidays and regular breaks, just as if you were working full time. Burnout is real. Work as much as you can be productive, and no more. There’s nothing to be gained by working 11 hours a day, 6 days a week, if 3 hours each day are spent singularly wishing you weren’t working.
  • You should be here. You got a place on a PhD programme because they want to work with you, and they want to support your project and put it out into the world with you. Impostor syndrome is a real thing, but it is not reflective of your ability.
  • Theoretical Physics is important, because exactly what is a liquid anyway, and why did you throw away half my makeup bag at security, Luton Airport? Can you define a liquid? Because you should publish a paper on that, as the first person ever to completely and wholly define a liquid, and buy me a new set of makeup. – an agitated Philosophy professor
A Survival Guide To Recycling in Germany

One of the most immediate culture shocks of traveling to Germany, especially if you grew up in the United States, is Germany’s seeming obsession with recycling. Whereas in the U.S. you are lucky if you can locate a recycling bin in public areas like parks or street corners, you’ll have the opposite problem in Germany, where you’ll find a sometimes confusing plethora of multi-colored bins. If you have been in this situation, looking around desperately to strangers or waiting to see what items other drop in each bin, we feel you. YOU are not alone. Even Germans sometimes question which bin is appropriate for which items.

Due to this common culture shock and the often harsh punishment one receives for a wrong move, we thought we’d give you the lowdown on German recycling.

Step 1: Prevent creating waste in the first place

Germany has created and continues to develop a culture of minimal waste. This is true for projects big and small: here are a few examples of major reducers of waste.

Bag fee: Germany combats the environmental threat of excessive plastic bag-use by adding a small fee onto bags at stores. Even though it’s small, the fee has further motivated people to bring their own reusable bags or carts to stores. Some stores now don’t offer plastic bags at all–opting instead to offer paper bags for those who need them.

Lack of excess packaging: Say tschüss to those individually wrapped fruit packages or items wrapped individually in plastic, then wrapped collectively in plastic.

Quality over quantity: According to a 2016 report by Germany Trade and Invest, Germans are well researched and particular consumers. They are much more risk averse and likely to return items that don’t meet their expectations. This makes things like quality labels or reviews really important and generally lends towards a population that has fewer, but higher quality possessions that don’t need constant replacement.

Step 2: Pfand

Imagine if, for every bottle–plastic or glass, you bought, you had to pay extra for it. The deal in Germany is that you pay more initially but then receive that surcharge back when you give the bottles back for recycling. So, just like when you weekly take the garbage out in the States, in Germany it is a regular habit to return your bin of recycling to super markets where you will find a machine like this:

This machine scans the bar code of your items, and prints a receipt for you to redeem at the register. Basically, if you don’t recycle your eligible items for Pfand, you are losing money.

As a tourist, you have potentially experienced Pfand in a different way. At Christmas markets, stands will charge you extra for the mug that hot drinks are served in. You can choose to keep the mug as a memento, or to return it for Pfand.

You may have also been asked for your empty bottle in public by someone collecting them to return. This is potentially convenient for you, earns them a little money by returning them AND it is good for the earth. Triple whammy! There are even entire non-profits that fund themselves by collecting Pfand at events or concerts.

Step 3: Choose your bin

This part sounds really uncomplicated from an American perspective. Trash or recycling…right?

After giving back bottles for Pfand, Germans sort trash typically by paper, plastic, bio/organic, glass, and other. Though details are dependent on town or region, a general breakdown goes like this:

Paper= blue bins. This bin is for cardboard, newspapers, magazines, waste paper, paper bags, etc, etc.

Plastic = Yellow bins. This is for plastic such as body wash, shampoo, sunscreen, laundry detergent, and juice bottles

Glass= Glass is sorted by color. There are different slots for depositing green, brown and clear glass. In this bin you should be putting any kind of jars (mustard, jam, yogurt, etc), oil bottles, wine bottles or the like.

Bio (organic) = green bins. This is for food waste like egg shells, banana peel, or scraps of food you didn’t eat.

Other = black bins. You choose your size and you’re charged accordingly. They send you a sticker each year to show that you’ve paid for it. Residual waste is garbage that neither includes pollutants nor reusable components. For example ash, dust bag, cigarette ends, rubber, toiletries, and diapers are thrown into the black bin.

Step 4: Enjoy a cleaner earth!

Though the effect of one person caring about the environment is small, the collective effort of a nation makes a dent. Germany leads the European nations in recycling, with around 70 percent of the waste the country generates successfully recovered and reused each year.

Recycling is only one part of Germany’s environmental efforts. Find more about national and local environmental initiatives here: http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/usa/en/07-Econ-Energy-Innovation/01-Energy-Climate-Env/Energy-Climate-Env.html

  • team rocket: let's steal some pokemon
  • team aqua/magma: hey man waking up a giant pokemon to destroy the world sounds nice do u prefer drowning or burning
  • team galactic: this world is impure and needs to be replaced with a perfect one but somehow we're gonna screw up and open a portal to a weird ass dimension
  • team plasma: humans are awful and we should liberate the pokemon oh wait just kidding we're just gonna steal them
  • team flare: this world is ugly af lets make it pretty but by being evil
  • team skull: yOOOOOOOOO ITS YA BOIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

full offence anyone saying that the possibility of cutting li shang out the live-action remake of mulan is okay because “mulan” is about her saving china and being a model female protagonist not about her and shang can come and fight me because asian men are just as important as asian women being represented in the media??? there are children who grew up with li shang as their oNLY representation!! li shang was the son of a captain who wanted to make his father proud, wanted to protect his country and lead a good army for the emperor, and in the end, went against the law to save mulan’s life for his and helped her when she came to the capital to defeat the huns like you’re sitting here and saying that it’s 100% okay to cut that narrative away??? “mulan” wasn’t just about mulan saving china, it was about her rising to the ranks in her army through preservance and struggles, it was about mulan changing the minds around her to shape people that ended up respecting her through and through, as both a man and a woman, and if you take away li shang you’re taking away an integral part of mulan so fuck you, disney, if you go through with this, fuck you.