need to craft

hmm, i’m kinda in the mood to write starters?? i’m taking a break from working on a bio for my new muse to go play gw2.

but when i get back, if anyone wants a starter, i’d love to write one for you.

the muses i’m feeling right now are yuri, akane, erika, tenth or eighth elder, and some soul weapons. so please reply to this post with which one ya wanna interact with?

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp Tips!

-SAVE YOUR LEAF TICKETS. These are extremely valuable and the hardest currency to get more of. Don’t waste them early on small projects that take minutes; some projects take days and some items are leaf ticket exclusive. Trust me, you can wait the few minutes in the beginning.

-Honey and fish nets aren’t really worth their price. If you look in an area multiple times (leave and come back) you’ll eventually find what you’re looking for. Honey and fish nets are also sometimes given to you as a log-in bonus and that’s really the best way to use them.

-Calling cards and request tickets are extremely useful; they let you do more requests and earn more materials and build affection with the villager you choose.

-If you shake fruit trees and leave the fruit on the ground, the tree can grow more while you leave the extras for when you need them to save on inventory space. They won’t spoil!

-Shaking trees that don’t grow fruit sometimes drops bells!

-Ask your friends to help you in the quarry, don’t use leaf tickets. It’s not worth it. Helping friends get into the quarry (the orange shovel icon next to them, helping is a button tap) earns you bells, so help each other!

-Bells are fairly easy to come by, but don’t waste them all either. I like to keep about 5,000 at all times in case.

-You unlock more villagers as you level up! Currently there are 40 villagers, with more to be added with future updates.

-Villagers affection level is locked at 7 by default, but building amenities that fit the theme they like will increase their max affection up to level 20, at which point you’ll earn their photo.

-Do all of your villagers requests to earn the supplies you need to craft new objects. Each villager gives out different materials, so help all of them to get what you need!

-Talk to your campsite villagers often, they have gifts for you!

-Don’t put rare items in your market box- they’re the least likely to sell. Sell extra regular items instead.

-Don’t worry about your loan from OK Motors too much. The upgrades don’t add huge amounts of space, so take your time.

-Remember this is a mobile game, and it’s not meant to be played 24/7. This is an app, and it’s not supposed to be played like a regular animal crossing game (playing for longer periods of time). Check in a few times a day and have fun!

Ideas for non-combat encounters/events

For when you want some variety for your tabletop RPG.  These events will also give your players a chance to use character skills they don’t often have opportunities for.

  • Natural Disaster - Have the town the PCs are in catch on fire and see what they do!  Do they cut their losses and run?  Do they heroically try to save trapped townspeople?  What do they do about the aftermath?  Natural disasters are an interesting challenge because there can be lots of danger and drama without necessarily having a villain.  It may also get your PCs to use skills they don’t commonly have a chance to.  You could also try floods, earthquakes, raging storms while at sea, etc.
  • Powerful Fortress - Put one of your party’s goals in a location where they won’t be able to prevail through combat alone (Example: a fortress where they are vastly outnumbered).  Your players will have to rely on either stealth or guile (or both) to accomplish their goal.  The pacing of such events can be frustrating to some players, but few sessions are as rewarding as a creatively executed heist or infiltration.
  • Dangerous Crossing - Give them a dangerous physical obstacle to overcome.  A canyon, or a raging river, or quicksand or an old battleground littered with traps and mines.
  • Festival - Have the PCs encounter a festival or tournament!  With lots of contests! This could be a good opportunity for them to build their fame and fortune (especially if you allow gambling).  Some of my favorite sessions have involved festivals.
  • Entertainment - Put the PCs in a situation where they have to entertain someone.  What do they come up with?
  • Letter - Have one of the PCs receive a letter, either from an NPC they’ve dealt with before or from someone involved with their backstory.  This is a good way to make the consequences of their actions seem more real.  You can also use it to introduce new plotlines/sidequests.
  • Crafting Challenge - Put the PCs in a situation where they need to craft something in order to accomplish their goal.  Maybe they need to make something in order to fix a mechanism?  Or in order to satisfy some local gift-giving custom?  Or they need a forgery?  Maybe as part of an exchange for something else they need?
  • Lost and Found - Have your PCs discover someone or something that is clearly lost.  Maybe they find an infant in the wilderness.  Or a key with a strange inscription, or some kind of talisman.  Throw in a clue or two to present your players with a tantalizing mystery.  
  • Inhospitable Wilderness - Have the PCs go somewhere it’s an effort just to survive.  A barren desert, a treacherous swamp with poison gasses, a forest so dense the ground never sees the sun, or even the bottom of the ocean.  Test their endurance and survival skills!
  • Dinner Party - Have the PCs be summoned to a formal event!  Test them on the battlegrounds of social grace and etiquette!  Even better if it’s in a dangerous environment or an alien culture.
  • Thief - Have something important stolen from the PCs.  See how they handle it.
  • Needle in a Haystack - Give the PCs something very difficult to find.  Like a single specific housecat in a sprawling metropolis, or a legendary weapon of which there are many fakes/copies.  

Really, if you need any more inspiration, look at your player’s character sheets and see if they’ve invested any points in a skill they haven’t gotten to use much.  Then invent a challenge they could feasibly use that skill for.  If you can’t think of a situation that could be helped by an Appraise, Craft: Calligraphy or Handle Animal check, you need to practice your own creative problem solving skills!

Witch Tips for City Witches

City Witch Tips for all of my fellow witches stuck in apartments, dorms or other city areas.

  • If you can’t burn incense you can make your own sprayable incense by mixing alcohol (usually vodka or rubbing) with essential oils and a bit of oil, spray in the air to act like incense
  • If you are unable to go outside for whatever reason to get rain water (in my case just no where to collect it safely), fill a jar or glass with regular water and keep it near a cracked window to charge it with the wind, sound and scent of the rain outside. Same goes for storm water
  • Trapped in city and unable to get ocean water? Sea salt mixed with rain/storm water can be an excellent substitute
  • To continue on with water substitutes, if you can’t collect snow crushed ice from your fridge will suffice
  • Low key warding/protection you can use: spray moon water, salt water or sprayable incense about your apartment or dorm, place sigils under doormats, furniture, inside cupboards, etc; place crystals about hidden or out in the open, sweep and dust out the door or towards windows
  • If you need melted wax to seal a jar or for any other magical purpose, but can’t burn candles, by a wax melter and melt that wax and imagine the light from the burner acting like a flame (plus they are rather cheap, I got mine for 25 bucks)
  • Need stars in your craft but too much light pollution? Glow in the dark stars on your ceiling or wall can work just as well for visualization. Print out pictures of your favorite constellations or planets and place them up on your walls or on your altar. Live video feed of the night sky can also be easily found on the internet
  • Bath magic is amazing for low-key ‘in the woods’ witches. Use teas, milk, oils, herbs, bath bombs, bubble baths, salts, etc that relate to your intent. It is also a good place to meditate if you have roommates or family around that would disturb you otherwise
  • If you do for whatever reason need to burn a candle, birthday candles are small, melt fast, and don’t create a lot of smoke or smokey scent
  • Sigils are another great low-key form of magic. To boost them up, use color magic related to the color you draw them in, write them using quills made of feathers related to your intent, use colored paper, rub a drop of essential oil on them, charge them with crystals or in your windowsill
  • You don’t have to burn sigils to activate them, which is hardly an option when you are in a dorm or apartment. Other options are: Shredding them, erasing them, soaking them in a bath or shower, using body heat or your own pulse, etc
  • Miss having the outdoors and plants around? Windowsill gardens can really help. Small plants you can consider keeping in your windowsill or counter-tops: succulents, cacti, bamboo, lemongrass, basic, rosemary, mint, rosemary, mosses, aloe, snake plant, pothos (and other vines), carrots, beets, shallots, lettuce, spinach, garlic, chives, parsley, oregano, thyme, and marigold
  • Open your window to let the wind and air from outside to help energize you and clear out negative energies inside
  • Fun places to put sigils: under furniture, carved into soap, onto shampoo/conditioner bottles, on your make up, inside phone cases, in shoes, under bandages, sewn into pillow cases and blankets, behind pictures in frames, underside of nail polish, carved into wax squares for your wax melter, keys and keychains, behind mirrors or in medicine cabinets, on bookmarks, on or in binders and pencil cases, on medicine bottles, and water bottles/travel mugs
  • Easy to make and dispose of poppets: carrot sticks (one of my personal favorites), apples or other fruit, clothe, paper, popsicle sticks, paper towels/napkins, toilet paper rolls, eggs, celery stocks, and cotton balls
  • The internet is an amazing thing. Need some sounds to help you focus or meditate? Easily look up the sounds of rain, storms, wind, ocean waves, jungles, forests, etc
  • Christmas lights are fun and great way to use discrete witchcraft. Select ones in the colors you wish for them to bring ie green for growth, yellow for inspiration, white for protection, purple for psychic abilities, etc. 
  • Some everyday things you can use for discrete witchcraft that don’t cost much at all or that you most likely already have: water, table salt, black pepper, paper, crayons/pencils/pens/markers, vinegar, milk, tea, highlighters, make up and beauty supplies, shampoo and conditioner, rubber bands, paperclips, thumbtacks, computer/phone/tablet, music/music player, playing cards, dice, air freshener, perfumes, toothpaste, rice, flour, sugar, honey, and all kitchen herbs and seasonings.
  • Can’t afford gemstones or crystals on college budget? Crackle and dyed quartz you can find super cheap at craftstores and online. I bought a whole bag for 4 bucks. Use them based on their colors and shapes. Can’t afford that but still want to use rocks in your craft? Find some rocks you like outside, again use their colors and shapes to determine their correspondences. Want to use them for a specific purpose? Paint sigils on them in the color that corresponds with what you want! Charge them in your windowsill or with your own energy and intent. There you go!
  • Pocket mirrors are cheap, easy to carry around and great for glamours and on the go magic. 
  • Seriously though, glamour spells are going to be a good option for you. use your make up, skin products, hair care products, brushes/combs, perfume, mirrors, toothbrush/toothepaste and intent. Good to do while you are getting ready for your day
  • Dream magic is another friend of the city witch! Use crystals, sigils, herbs, etc near your bed before you go to sleep, drink some chamomile, get yourself a dream journal (mine is literally a notebook with construction paper on it), keep it and a pen near you. In the morning write down your dreams, your thoughts, how you feel (tired, refreshed, groggy, etc), and interpret them. 
  • Can’t afford tarot cards? Print out some, you can usually find them online and they won’t last as long as a real deck but it is a good temporary solution. Want a Ouija board but can’t keep one or need it to be easily hidden? Print one out, draw on one on paper or cardboard, fold it up and store it once you are done. Want a pendulum but can’t afford one? Use your favorite necklace, bracelet or keychain!
  • Tea and coffee magic is great, make your own tea blends with the herbs you like. Or just buy simple green or black tea and add sugar, milk, etc depending on your intentions
  • As I said before, crock pot magic. The Modern Cauldron: brew and cook all day with it, fill your apartment with the scent of the herbs and food to fill it with the energies they correspond with and you get a delicious meal to come home to! Most dorms allow them. Rice cookers also work well.
  • Can’t afford fresh food? Have to survive on ramen, canned soup, and microwaved meals? That is okay! They even correspond with things! Tomato soup for love, beauty and passion. Beef ramen noodles for strength, courage and longevity. Microwave mac n cheese for beauty and feminity. Look at their ingredients and what they correspond with. Sure its not as glamorous as a making a huge made by scratch traditional meal but its kitchen magic none the less. Stir it with your intent while you cook. It isn’t fancy but it works just as well!
  • Use a notebook or binder for a nice grimoire, decorate it as much as you want on the inside. Print out pictures of nature, animals, planets, stars, places, crystals, etc that you cant’ access/afford and use them in your craft. Spell books and grimoires are powerful tools
  • Don’t have a wand? Use a wooden spoon. Tie a colored string or ribbon to it to correspond with what energy you want it to have and move and flick it as you would a wand. 
  • Knitting, crocheting, and knot magic is very apartment friendly. As well as sewing and embroidering plus it is super calming.
  • Glitter, sequins, and beads are great in witchcraft! Use their colors to determine their correspondences. Put them in spell jars, sachets, bottles, etc. Glitter tip: if you spill any don’t fret, get some packing tape, wrap it around your hand with the sticky part outwards and dab at that glitter spill. You will literally pick up all of the glitter in seconds!
  • Enchant and charge your pots, pans, skillets, and other cookware to make every meal magical
  • Make moonwater in your windowsills. Use it for cleansing, beauty, divination, clarity, protection and purification
  • Take walks. Even if it is a city there is still nature about. Pigeons flying about, potted flowers outside of stores, grass growing in front lawns, etc. Enjoy yourself, even if it is not some wild, vast forest you can still connect with your local nature.
  • Pick up litter or garbage you see outside, being in the city we all see it. The natural world around you will appreciate you helping out. Bring a bag with you when you take your walks or travel and fill it with wrappers you see on the ground.

I hope this was helpful to all of my fellow city and dorm witches!

3

Sandylion Spongebob stickers🦀🐠

Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully - in Ten Minutes

by Stephen King
(reprinted in Sylvia K. Burack, ed. The Writer’s Handbook. Boston, MA: Writer, Inc., 1988: 3-9)

I. The First Introduction

THAT’S RIGHT. I know it sounds like an ad for some sleazy writers’ school, but I really am going to tell you everything you need to pursue a successful and financially rewarding career writing fiction, and I really am going to do it in ten minutes, which is exactly how long it took me to learn.  It will actually take you twenty minutes or so to read this essay, however, because I have to tell you a story, and then I have to write a second introduction.  But these, I argue, should not count in the ten minutes.



II. The Story, or, How Stephen King Learned to Write

When I was a sophomore in high school, I did a sophomoric thing which got me in a pot of fairly hot water, as sophomoric didoes often do.  I wrote and published a small satiric newspaper called The Village Vomit.  In this little paper I lampooned a number of teachers at Lisbon (Maine) High School, where I was under instruction.  These were not very gentle lampoons; they ranged from the scatological to the downright cruel

Eventually, a copy of this little newspaper found its way into the hands of a faculty member, and since I had been unwise enough to put my name on it (a fault, some critics argue, of which I have still not been entirely cured), I was brought into the office. The sophisticated satirist had by that time reverted to what he really was: a fourteen-year-old kid who was shaking in his boots and wondering if he was going to get a suspension … what we called “a three-day vacation” in those dim days of 1964.

I wasn’t suspended. I was forced to make a number of apologies - they were warranted, but they still tasted like dog-dirt in my mouth - and spent a week in detention hall. And the guidance counselor arranged what he no doubt thought of as a more constructive channel for my talents. This was a job - contingent upon the editor’s approval - writing sports for the Lisbon Enterprise, a twelve-page weekly of the sort with which any small-town resident will be familiar. This editor was the man who taught me everything I know about writing in ten minutes. His name was John Gould - not the famed New England humorist or the novelist who wrote The Greenleaf Fires, but a relative of both, I believe.

He told me he needed a sports writer and we could “try each other out” if I wanted.

I told him I knew more about advanced algebra than I did sports.

Gould nodded and said, “You’ll learn.”

I said I would at least try to learn. Gould gave me a huge roll of yellow paper and promised me a wage of 1/2¢ per word. The first two pieces I wrote had to do with a high school basketball game in which a member of my school team broke the Lisbon High scoring record. One of these pieces was straight reportage. The second was a feature article.

I brought them to Gould the day after the game, so he’d have them for the paper, which came out Fridays. He read the straight piece, made two minor corrections, and spiked it. Then he started in on the feature piece with a large black pen and taught me all I ever needed to know about my craft. I wish I still had the piece - it deserves to be framed, editorial corrections and all - but I can remember pretty well how it looked when he had finished with it. Here’s an example:

(note: this is before the edit marks indicated on King’s original copy)

Last night, in the well-loved gymnasium of Lisbon High School, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom, known as “Bullet” Bob for both his size and accuracy, scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his knight-like quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon thinclads since 1953….

(after edit marks)

Last night, in the Lisbon High School gymnasium, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon’s basketball team since 1953….

When Gould finished marking up my copy in the manner I have indicated above, he looked up and must have seen something on my face. I think he must have thought it was horror, but it was not: it was revelation.

“I only took out the bad parts, you know,” he said. “Most of it’s pretty good.”

“I know,” I said, meaning both things: yes, most of it was good, and yes, he had only taken out the bad parts. “I won’t do it again.”

“If that’s true,” he said, “you’ll never have to work again. You can do this for a living.” Then he threw back his head and laughed.

And he was right; I am doing this for a living, and as long as I can keep on, I don’t expect ever to have to work again.



III. The Second Introduction

All of what follows has been said before. If you are interested enough in writing to be a purchaser of this magazine, you will have either heard or read all (or almost all) of it before. Thousands of writing courses are taught across the United States each year; seminars are convened; guest lecturers talk, then answer questions, then drink as many gin and tonics as their expense-fees will allow, and it all boils down to what follows.

I am going to tell you these things again because often people will only listen - really listen - to someone who makes a lot of money doing the thing he’s talking about. This is sad but true. And I told you the story above not to make myself sound like a character out of a Horatio Alger novel but to make a point: I saw, I listened, and I learned. Until that day in John Gould’s little office, I had been writing first drafts of stories which might run 2,500 words. The second drafts were apt to run 3,300 words. Following that day, my 2,500-word first drafts became 2,200-word second drafts. And two years after that, I sold the first one.

So here it is, with all the bark stripped off. It’ll take ten minutes to read, and you can apply it right away…if you listen.



IV. Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully

1.  BE TALENTED
This, of course, is the killer.  What is talent?  I can hear someone shouting, and here we are, ready to get into a discussion right up there with “what is the meaning of life?” for weighty pronouncements and total uselessness.  For the purposes of the beginning writer, talent may as well be defined as eventual success - publication and money.  If you wrote something for which someone sent you a check, if you cashed the check and it didn’t bounce, and if you then paid the light bill with the money, I consider you talented.

Now some of you are really hollering.  Some of you are calling me one crass money-fixated creep.  And some of you are calling me bad names.  Are you calling Harold Robbins talented?  someone in one of the Great English Departments of America is screeching.  V.C. Andrews?  Theodore Dreiser?  Or what about you, you dyslexic moron?

Nonsense.  Worse than nonsense, off the subject.  We’re not talking about good or bad here.  I’m interested in telling you how to get your stuff published, not in critical judgments of who’s good or bad.  As a rule the critical judgments come after the check’s been spent, anyway.  I have my own opinions, but most times I keep them to myself.  People who are published steadily and are paid for what they are writing may be either saints or trollops, but they are clearly reaching a great many someones who want what they have.  Ergo, they are communicating.  Ergo, they are talented.  The biggest part of writing successfully is being talented, and in the context of marketing, the only bad writer is one who doesn’t get paid.  If you’re not talented, you won’t succeed.  And if you’re not succeeding, you should know when to quit.

When is that?  I don’t know.  It’s different for each writer.  Not after six rejection slips, certainly, nor after sixty.  But after six hundred?  Maybe.  After six thousand?  My friend, after six thousand pinks, it’s time you tried painting or computer programming.

Further, almost every aspiring writer knows when he is getting warmer - you start getting little jotted notes on your rejection slips, or personal letters…maybe a commiserating phone call.  It’s lonely out there in the cold, but there are encouraging voices…unless there is nothing in your words which warrants encouragement.  I think you owe it to yourself to skip as much of the self-illusion as possible.  If your eyes are open, you’ll know which way to go…or when to turn back.

2.  BE NEAT
Type.  Double-space.  Use a nice heavy white paper, never that erasable onion-skin stuff.  If you’ve marked up your manuscript a lot, do another draft.

3.  BE SELF-CRITICAL
If you haven’t marked up your manuscript a lot, you did a lazy job.  Only God gets things right the first time.  Don’t be a slob.

4.  REMOVE EVERY EXTRANEOUS WORD
You want to get up on a soapbox and preach?  Fine.  Get one and try your local park.  You want to write for money?  Get to the point.  And if you remove all the excess garbage and discover you can’t find the point, tear up what you wrote and start all over again…or try something new.

5.  NEVER LOOK AT A REFERENCE BOOK WHILE DOING A FIRST DRAFT You want to write a story?  Fine.  Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus.  Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket.  The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time.  Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word.  There are no exceptions to this rule.  You think you might have misspelled a word?  O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer’s trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later.  Why not?  Did you think it was going to go somewhere?  And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don’t have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland?  You can check it…but laterWhen you sit down to write, write.  Don’t do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

6.  KNOW THE MARKETS
Only a dimwit would send a story about giant vampire bats surrounding a high school to McCall’s.  Only a dimwit would send a tender story about a mother and daughter making up their differences on Christmas Eve to Playboy…but people do it all the time.  I’m not exaggerating; I have seen such stories in the slush piles of the actual magazines.  If you write a good story, why send it out in an ignorant fashion?  Would you send your kid out in a snowstorm dressed in Bermuda shorts and a tank top?  If you like science fiction, read the magazines.  If you want to write confession stories, read the magazines.  And so on.  It isn’t just a matter of knowing what’s right for the present story; you can begin to catch on, after awhile, to overall rhythms, editorial likes and dislikes, a magazine’s entire slant.  Sometimes your reading can influence the next story, and create a sale.

7.  WRITE TO ENTERTAIN
Does this mean you can’t write “serious fiction”?  It does not.  Somewhere along the line pernicious critics have invested the American reading and writing public with the idea that entertaining fiction and serious ideas do not overlap.  This would have surprised Charles Dickens, not to mention Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, and hundreds of others.  But your serious ideas must always serve your story, not the other way around.  I repeat: if you want to preach, get a soapbox.

8.  ASK YOURSELF FREQUENTLY, AM I HAVING FUN?”
The answer needn’t always be yes.  But if it’s always no, it’s time for a new project or a new career.

9.  HOW TO EVALUATE CRITICISM
Show your piece to a number of people - ten, let us say.  Listen carefully to what they tell you.  Smile and nod a lot.  Then review what was said very carefully.  If your critics are all telling you the same thing about some facet of your story - a plot twist that doesn’t work, a character who rings false, stilted narrative, or half a dozen other possibles - change that facet.  It doesn’t matter if you really liked that twist of that character; if a lot of people are telling you something is wrong with you piece, it is.  If seven or eight of them are hitting on that same thing, I’d still suggest changing it.  But if everyone - or even most everyone - is criticizing something different, you can safely disregard what all of them say.

10.  OBSERVE ALL RULES FOR PROPER SUBMISSION
Return postage, self-addressed envelope, all of that.

11.  AN AGENT?  FORGET IT.  FOR NOW
Agents get 10% of monies earned by their clients.  10% of nothing is nothing.  Agents also have to pay the rent.  Beginning writers do not contribute to that or any other necessity of life.  Flog your stories around yourself.  If you’ve done a novel, send around query letters to publishers, one by one, and follow up with sample chapters and/or the manuscript complete.  And remember Stephen King’s First Rule of Writers and Agents, learned by bitter personal experience: You don’t need one until you’re making enough for someone to steal…and if you’re making that much, you’ll be able to take your pick of good agents.

12.  IF IT’S BAD, KILL IT
When it comes to people, mercy killing is against the law.  When it comes to fiction, it is the law.



That’s everything you need to know.  And if you listened, you can write everything and anything you want.  Now I believe I will wish you a pleasant day and sign off.

My ten minutes are up.

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Here it is at last! The Gates of Moria, completely finished.

Most of this is stem stitch, with split stitch for the details in the middle and tiny backstitch for the writing. It took about 25 hours (in between a lot of procrastinating and several other projects). A not-insignificant amount of that time was spent pulling out stitches and redoing them until I was happy with the way a line looked. Of course, I still look at this and see things that could be improved, but I’m happy with it as it is.

I was originally planning to frame this in a slightly smaller hoop and just leave out the very bottom, but that hoop was too small and would’ve cut off too much. Of course, that meant I had a bit more work to do than I originally thought

I left out the English translation at the bottom because I don’t think it’d look that good, and anyway I’ve had more than enough writing to do on this piece already. I promise I’m not going to complain about that anymore, I did enough of that in previous posts.

This is the companion to my White Tree and One Ring hoops, though I’ve done other Middle Earth pieces as well. I, uh, really like Tolkien, you guys.

Making Fabric Poppets

I want to teach you all how I make my fabric poppets, and how you can make your own too. Here is my post detailing all of what I do to make my adorable plush fabric poppets.

I also sell them if making them yourself is too much fuss for any reason. Here are details.

——Supplies——

- Fabric of your choice- My fabric of choice is fleece. The fabric should be a color you can match with your intent, personality, etc.

- Person-shaped pattern to trace- You can use a gingerbread man cookie cutter to make your paper pattern, free hand, or if you like you can use mine which I will gladly sell you a copy of- message me for details.

- Needle and thread- You can use different thread colors for different intentions.

- Stuffing and any extras- herbs, objects, etc.

- A marker of a similar but darker color than the fabric

- Scissors


-Step 1-

Lay out your fabric. Lay down the poppet pattern on the fabric. I prefer to weight them down with rocks so they don’t shift. (You can of course choose rocks that match your intent.)

-Step 1.5-

I then trace the patter with a maker that is of a similar color to the fabric, but off enough that I can see it. Don’t worry about being super clean with your lines because they will be hidden in the inside seams.

-Step 2-

Next, to sew the pieces together. Place them together so that the side with the marker line faces out.

Then, grab your needle and thread. Thread your needle.

Be sure to have a piece of thread to work with that is about as long as your arm. This should be enough for the whole poppet, but make sure to have more on hand just in case.

-Step 3-

Start your sewing in the place where the opening will end later. I typically choose the “armpit” of the poppet because then the opening gives me great access to all of its insides for later.

I use a kind of slip stitch for sewing. Really any stitch will do, but I will show you mine. I put the needle all the way through both pieces of fabric to make a loop, and before tightening I stick the needle through the loop, then tighten. This makes a kind of knot that is durable and nice looking. Here’s a picture:

Aside- Why I hand sew- I find the process of hand sewing to be not only relaxing but also more magical. I can focus on my intentions while I sew, and with each stitch I’m fastening my energy into it. This is by no means the only way you can sew them together, but it is my personal preferred way.

 Continue sewing around to join the two pieces of fabric. **Remember to leave a 1.5in opening! Also leave your thread attached!** This is the only way to turn it inside out and hide the seams.

- Step 4-

Turn it inside-out. Reach inside and grab the top of the poppet’s head and pull it through the hole like shown. You may need to poke around a bit to make sure everything is fully turned right-side-out.

-Step 5- Once right-side-out, your poppet is ready for stuffing. Start with the appendages first, that way you can make sure they are well-fluffed. After that, if you want add in balls of stuffing in the places of major organs to make it more human. (A ball for a brain, a ball for a stomach, that kind of thing)

If you like, add in herbs or objects for your intent, or keys to link the poppet with the person that you’re targeting. Consider positions of the objects and herbs inside the poppet and the significance. I added rose petals in the head and heart of this one, and mint and rosemary in the stomach. That gives it some symbolism, and what witch doesn’t enjoy symbolism?

-Step 6- When it is stuffed to satisfaction, sew up the opening with the same stitch we sewed with before flipping it. This leaves a rough edge, and I actually like it that way. It makes it easier to cut open the stitching if you ever wanted to for any reason. I can’t be the only person that’s wanted to rip someone’s stuffing out (there’s a curse idea) so I hope you find it useful too.

Do a couple more stitches to assure your thread isn’t going anywhere and then cut it off.

Ta-da! A perfect poppet for all of your witchcraft needs.

Happy crafting! 

 - Max the Death Witch

10
“to be a witch” falsehoods

there are a lot of misconceptions going around lately on what someone needs to be a witch, i just want to clear some up. 

you do not need:

fancy tools - or any tools at all, really. all you need is yourself and your intent. sure, tools that fit your aesthetic are nice, but you don’t need them. if you have the ability to buy and you want to, there’s no stopping you, but please don’t feel like you have to go out and buy yourself an etsy broom or a cauldron. and don’t stress yourself out over making one either! they are but trappings.

appearance - in witchy aesthetic photos, it’s usually a slim, white girl with long hair. and that lack of a more diverse representation can give the impression that you need to look and be a certain way, but please know it is untrue. it does not matter what your race, weight, hair, or anything looks like. 

aesthetic - you don’t need to dress “like a witch”. a witch can look like anything. if you want to indulge in the black cat, black clothes look, fine, but you don’t need to confine yourself to it if it’s not your thing, you can look like whatever you want to. 

gender - there are some in the community that will fight tooth and nail to make it seem you have to be a cis female to call yourself a witch. don’t listen to those terfs. anyone can be a witch, regardless of gender. male, non-binary, agender, trans, demi, etc. 

black cat - you don’t need a black cat. you don’t need to have a familiar either. those are unique relations that should not be forced to happen

dark, mystical attitude - you don’t need to suddenly start talking like chaucer or put effort into having an air of mystery. you don’t need to be holier than thou, or act like you know it all. witchcraft is a journey that takes time to learn. 

cursing - no, you don’t need to curse. but you don’t need to shame someone for cursing either.

on a spiritual path - witchcraft does not have to be spiritual! you can practice magic without having to worry about being “spiritual enough”, because each craft is unique and deeply personal, you don’t need to force it to be something that you’re not invested in.

religious -  there are many witches that wonder where the power comes from if they don’t call upon a god. the power can come from you. you do not need to devote yourself to a god 

wiccan - wicca is not the only way to do witchcraft, it is only one way of practicing magic. there are many people who think the only way to do witchcraft is to be wiccan, but they are misinformed. if you do not want to work with wiccan influences or traditions, you do not have to. 

initiated - some practices, some traditions, initiation is needed. however, to be a witch in general, you don’t need to go through any ritual to prove yourself one. be wary of those who insist you do, they are often trying to take advantage of new witches. 

straight/cis - some traditions you’ll encounter have homophobic roots/influences. while it is discouraging, you dont have to listen to those, or you can work with others to rework phobic traditions

a “natural” witch -  some people will claim to have “witch’s blood” or “the flame”, meaning witchcraft has been in their families for generations. this does not make them superior or more of a witch than you. anyone who wants to be a witch can, no matter their birth circumstances. 

labelled - a lot of witches label their craft, “herb witch”, “space witch”, “storm witch” etc. you can be as many as you want, or none if it pleases you. you do not need to label your craft however. some people can’t put their craft in a box.

td;lr, you do need:

  • to want to be a witch
  • your intent
  • that’s it! happy casting!
  • <p> <b>Friend:</b> Oh you're a witch? Cool, what do you do?<p/><b>Me:</b> Mostly stare at my lunar calendar, leave bottles of water outside at night and light stuff on fire. Oh and I have cupboards of tea and a whole closet for spices and five kinds of salt.<p/><b>Friend:</b> And this...helps you be a witch?<p/><b>Me:</b> Yes and no.<p/></p>
Tips for the Secret Witch

For all the witches who need to keep their Craft under wraps. Whether it is because of a lack of space, sharing your space with religious roommates (or simply people who don’t “get” witchcraft), or if you just would like your privacy, this list can help you out.

Originally posted by shayspieterse

Altars

- Keep all your ritual tools in a plain box (like a shoe box) that can be easily tucked under your bed or in your closet and away from prying eyes.

- You can draw out an altar in a sketchbook. You can also add pictures printed from online or from magazines.

- Using glass jar candles can help make any magical space look mundane, and they come in a large variety of scents too (and people will always know what to get you when holidays roll around!).

- If you want to make an altar for a deity, but can’t make it too obvious, put a jar candle next to a trinket or picture associated with that deity. For example, a rose candle next to a sea shell for Aphrodite.

Magick

- Use colors matching your intent. This can mean you wear a red shirt, or carry a blue pen, or carry a green handbag. 

- Enchant your jewelry. You can make a bracelet for protection, earrings for love, a necklace for luck, etc.

- Enchant your makeup, lotion or hair products. You can also use your face cleanser as a magical cleanser as well.

- Sigils. Sigils are simple symbols with intent put into them. They can be easily mistaken for simple doodles or intricate designs.

Crystals, Herbs and Incense

- If you are planning on having herbs in your room/space, you may wish to keep them in mason jars rather than plastic baggies. Many ignorant people assume that any herb in a baggy is marijuana. I’ve had someone mistake chamomile for marijuana before…

- Drinking tea is an innocent way to incorporate herbs into any practice. Teas come in all sorts of blends and flavors (they also usually come in fancy tins that you can save!). If you have a well known fondness for tea, if you start to buy herbs to mix your own blends, most wouldn’t blink an eye.

- Gardening or house plants. This is an easy way to incorporate herbs and plants without drawing attention.

- Crystals are very pretty. Crystal and rock collecting is also a very common hobby. 

- If you don’t have access to incense, use jar candles, wax melts (with the warmers) or any type of open-and-leave-it air fresheners.

Witchy Tools 

- To make an easy pendulum, loop a piece of cord or string through a ring. The weight of the ring will act just like a pendulum. You can also use an old necklace or bracelet depending on the length of the chain.

- Playing cards instead of Tarot cards. If you have trouble remembering the cards, doodle little symbols on each card that help you remember. You can also use trading game cards (like Pokemon or Yu-Gi-Oh!) if the pictures help you more.

Grimoires and Witchy Books

- Depending on your living situation, a plain notebook may not deter nosey people from snooping. If you need an alternative, pick up an old book from a thrift shop to write notes in. You can add notes in the margins, write over the print with markers, or glue in your own pages. This way your grimoire can sit on your bookshelf and look completely innocent.

- Note taking apps. I recommend Tumblr for a secret witch, mainly because you can have a witchy side blog to hold all your notes and no one will know. However, there are also a lot of note-taking apps (like OneNote) that let you create various “notebooks” and sections.

- Planner notebooks or binders. Most planners have some sort of personal inserts that can be made that you can write witchy notes. It’s also a super easy way to keep track of moon cycles and sabbats. This also allows you to get super creative.