nedhepburn

This one time I painted a living room with a girl.

This was a handful of years back. It was about eight months before the huge, flame-out of a breakup. That day, though? That day we painted the living room? It was pretty uneventful. We painted my parents living room for $50 between us and a pizza. That was it. I think we watched Anchorman or something after that.

But it still holds as on of the most indelible memories I have. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not still in love, it happened, it was good, it ended, and we’ve both moved on. But I’ll never forget that day. Because it’s never, in the long run, about the grand gestures. You can fly across the world and show up on her doorstep with a rose in your teeth and a ring in a little velvet box but I can guarantee you that - more often than not - she’s going to remember the time you built the birdhouse in the back yard, or what have you, a whole lot more.

Life wasn’t meant to be taken in large movements. The next day will inevitably arrive, you’ll sleep, and the moment will have passed. But when you have a hundred thousand small moments, you can step back and appreciate the picture a lot more than metaphorically blowing your load on some grand moment that, in all honesty, look, you’re not Bruce Fucking Springsteen, you’re not going to be able to blow everyone’s mind every single night. You’re not Romeo and/or Juliet. There’s no reason to drink the poison together in some flame-out gesture. So that leaves us with the small stuff. It’s all about the detail.

That’s what love is. Attention to detail.

And the moment will end. And then things will get boring. And it might get a little quiet. And it might all end horribly. And you might hate each other at the end. And you might walk away from each other one day and never speak again. But that’s just how it goes.

But she’ll remember the time you held the door open for her on your first date.
She’ll remember the time you laughed at her impression of the landlady.
She’ll remember the time you stayed up all night that first time.
She’ll remember the small things a lot longer than the big ones.

But everything ends. And I’ll tell you why you have to make the small things, the small moments count so much more:

One day, probably a while longer from now, when old age takes ahold of someone, she might just only remember your smile. Everything you ever did together, every second, every moment, every beat, every morning spent in bed, every evening spent together on the sofa, all of that - gone. Everything you ever did will be reduced to the head of a pin. She won’t remember your name. She’ll just remember your smile, and she’ll smile. She won’t know why. It’s a base, gut reaction. But she’ll smile, uncontrollably, and it will come from somewhere so deep as to know that you touched her on a primal, honest, and true level that no scientist, scholar, or savant could ever begin to explain. There is no more. There is nothing else. There is just this: She’ll remember your smile, and she’ll smile.

And you know what? That’s all that really matters in the end.

- Ned Hepburn

Meetings are strange. Two adults sitting and talking about a thing. One thing. For a while. That isn’t how people actually talk in real life. People bubble and veer off in real life and go all over the place. Having a sit-down talk about something deathly serious – people could potentially lose their fucking jobs over this – lives could be changed here – is an acquired skill. Its a difficult thing. Some people are born to meet. To others, it will forever be like rollerblading verbally.
—  Ned Hepburn

anonymous asked:

What is your favorite blog on tumblr?

I may not be able to pick a favorite blog, but this list of people you should follow comes pretty damn close.

Ned Hepburn. A man who posts this on the same blog where he posts this is bound to have his own take on life, one that I hope I can appreciate. His blog inspires me, and sometimes I don’t even know why.

Josh Is Hollywood. Josh seems to be running a social experiment on us all. His take on everything is his niche in the tumblr community, and often it can be quite entertaining to read either his opinion, or the reactions towards his opinion.

Yummei. She has got to be one of my favorite digital artists. If a quick look at her blog doesn’t convince you, this will. She has done other, more extensive projects, but this one is a quick preview of what she is capable of. [Which is a lot.]

Sir Mitchell. I can’t say it better than he does. “I am artist Mike Mitchell and these are some of my creations, as well as random things from the internet that I find interesting/hilarious/stupid.”

SfeMonster. Sfe draws too, but what interests me is sfe’s original characters, particularly this guy. Also, sfe’s interesting and relevant commentary on gender pronouns, which can be found here.

And then, of course, nerdfighter or not, Hank Green and his brother John are always good follows for their holistic view of the world and what we should do about it.

And that’s about it. Of course I would always recommend my friends’ tumblrs, but you should ask them first. Hope this helps !

The State Of The Union (of blogs)

Ned Hepburn made a pretty good point in this blog post where he described blogging now as “crowd management.” To paraphrase, he said that making media while knowing how the reader is going to consume that media is “boring." 

Not that I’m jumping to his side like some overly eager fanboy or anything, but I’m jumping to his side like some overly eager fanboy who sincerely agrees.

Yesterday, I realized that I’d been on Tumblr for four years. I’ve run the gamut of blogger archetypes: Passionate yet incoherent, long-winded and dull, sassy, sporadic, a complete waste of time, brilliant. (That last one might just be me.) But it’s certainly changed, and no longer do I feel the same vibe that I felt when I signed up as an impressionable eighteen-year-old looking for a community of free-wheeling creators.

Very rarely around here will you find individuals who are completely original. Sure, they’ll reblog and rehash old content, but they’ll give it their own flair. They’ll give their take on it. And along with that reblogged content, they’ll throw in some wonderful pieces of their own, whether it’s fact or fiction, poetry, prose, or pictured. I followed some of these people way back. I still follow them today. And I’m still looking.

But still, we’re all the exception now. I won’t complain that a GIF of a cat or a picture of Sherlock with some quote in Futura will get more notes than — say — a beautiful piece of prose, or a song composed by an unknown who might one day become famous. I think it’s unfair to judge bloggers based on the reach of their posts, and immature to complain about it. I find it interesting, though, that the divides between cliques around here have grown wider, so that if you’re not "in” with the Whovians, or “in” with the 14-18 demographic, you’re not “in” with Tumblr.

And when you’re not “in” with Tumblr — or perhaps “in” with the same crowd as someone else — there’s bound to be conflict. Suddenly your work becomes scrutinized by everyone who’s not you. In that way, the Internet becomes like real life, in that you can’t expect to say something without ten other people giving you some sort of shit for it (with the occasional word of praise.)

Where am I going with this? I suppose what I’m saying is this: If you are holding yourself back from posting anything on the Internet, saying anything in the world, doing anything at all, even, don’t. If you feel like it needs to be said, say it. If they restrain you for saying it, it’s too late! You’ve said it, and it’s out there, and nothing can shove those words back into your mouth.

Fuck the audience. Fuck crowd management. The crowd will manage themselves, and if it ends up that they all massacre each other in a bloody slaughter, then at least you’ll come out of it alive. I know that you will.

And therefore: Piss.

I love you. <3 XOXOXO

7

Did I do this right? I didn’t even kern and I gave it all the right tags! EDIT: I also forgot “IF YOU DON’T REBLOG THIS YOU CLEARLY DON’T HAVE A HEART” and “REBLOGGING ONLY TAKES ONE MINUTE KS? EACH REBLOG ENTERS YOU TO WIN AN AWESOME IPAD AND MACBOOKPRO! OMGZ”

nedhepburn:

CLEVER THINKING: Help pass Warren Buffett’s idea to stop the budget deficit.

“I could end the deficit in 5 minutes,” Warren told CNBC. “You just pass a law that says that anytime there is a deficit of more than 3% of GDP, all sitting members of Congress are ineligible for re-election. The 26th amendment (granting the right to vote for 18 year-olds) took only 3 months & 8 days to be ratified! Why? Simple! The people demanded it. That was in 1971…before computers, e-mail, cell phones, etc. Of the 27 amendments to
the Constitution, seven took 1 year or less to become the law of the land…all because of public pressure.

Warren Buffet is asking each addressee to forward the following message to a minimum of twenty people on their address list; in turn ask each of those to do likewise. In three days, most people in The United States of America will have the message. This is one idea that really should be passed around.


Congressional Reform Act of 2011

  1.  No Tenure / No Pension. A Congressman collects a salary while in office and receives no pay when they are out of office.
  2. Congress (past, present & future) participates in Social Security. All funds in the Congressional retirement fund move to the Social Security system immediately. All future funds flow into the Social Security system, and Congress participates with the American people. It may not be used for any other purpose.
  3. Congress can purchase their own retirement plan, just as all Americans do.
  4. Congress will no longer vote themselves a pay raise. Congressional pay will rise by the lower of CPI or 3%.
  5. Congress loses their current health care system and participates in the same health care system as the American people.
  6. Congress must equally abide by all laws they impose on the American people.
  7. All contracts with past and present Congressmen are void effective 1/1/12. The American people did not make this contract with Congressmen. Congressmen made all these contracts for themselves. Serving in Congress is an honor, not a career. The Founding Fathers envisioned citizen legislators, so ours should serve their term’s), then go home and back to work.

If each person contacts a minimum of twenty people then it will only take
three days for most people (in the U.S.) to receive the message. Maybe it is
time.

 

This one time I painted a living room with a girl. This was a handful of years back. It was about eight months before the huge, flame-out of a breakup. That day, though? That day we painted the living room? It was pretty uneventful. We painted my parents living room for $50 between us and a pizza. That was it. I think we watched Anchorman or something after that. But it still holds as on of the most indelible memories I have. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not still in love, it happened, it was good, it ended, and we’ve both moved on. But I’ll never forget that day. Because it’s never, in the long run, about the grand gestures. You can fly across the world and show up on her doorstep with a rose in your teeth and a ring in a little velvet box but I can guarantee you that - more often than not - she’s going to remember the time you built the birdhouse in the back yard, or what have you, a whole lot more. Life wasn’t meant to be taken in large movements. The next day will inevitably arrive, you’ll sleep, and the moment will have passed. But when you have a hundred thousand small moments, you can step back and appreciate the picture a lot more than metaphorically blowing your load on some grand moment that, in all honesty, look, you’re not Bruce Fucking Springsteen, you’re not going to be able to blow everyone’s mind every single night. You’re not Romeo and/or Juliet. There’s no reason to drink the poison together in some flame-out gesture. So that leaves us with the small stuff. It’s all about the detail. That’s what love is. Attention to detail. And the moment will end. And then things will get boring. And it might get a little quiet. And it might all end horribly. And you might hate eachother at the end. And you might walk away from eachother one day and never speak again. But that’s just how it goes. But she’ll remember the time you held the door open for her on your first date. She’ll remember the time you laughed at her impression of the landlady. She’ll remember the time you stayed up all night that first time. She’ll remember the small things a lot longer than the big ones. But everything ends. And I’ll tell you why you have to make the small things, the small moments count so much more: One day, probably a while longer from now, when old age takes ahold of someone, she might just only remember your smile. Everything you ever did together, every second, every moment, every beat, every morning spent in bed, every evening spent together on the sofa, all of that - gone. Everything you ever did will be reduced to the head of a pin. She won’t remember your name. She’ll just remember your smile, and she’ll smile. She won’t know why. It’s a base, gut reaction. But she’ll smile, uncontrollably, and it will come from somewhere so deep as to know that you touched her on a primal, honest, and true level that no scientist, scholar, or savant could ever begin to explain. There is no more. There is nothing else. There is just this: She’ll remember your smile, and she’ll smile. And you know what? That’s all that really matters in the end.