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Mo'ne Davis’ Chevy Ad Will Leave You With A Lump In Your Throat

Is there anything Mo'ne Davis can’t do?

After wowing the world with her arm and becoming the first female pitcher ever to win a game at the Little League World Series, the 13-year-old Philadelphian is now starring in an ad for Chevrolet.

Watch the full commercial and learn more about the incredible Davis here. 

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More girls should join boys’ teams so it could be a tradition and it wouldn’t be so special.” - 13-year-old Mo’Ne Davis, the 18th girl to play in the Little League World Series in its 68-year history, the FIRST girl to throw a Little League World Series SHUTOUT. Her fastball? 70 MILES PER HOUR. #throwlikeagirl #BlackGirlsROCK

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Thirteen-year old baseball phenom Mo’ne Davis has launched a sneaker line to help impoverished girls

“I never thought at the age of 13 I’d be a role model, but having young girls look up to me is pretty cool,” Mo’Ne said in a news release. “If I can inspire them to reach their goals, that would be even cooler. Designing shoes with M4D3 (Make a Difference Everyday) is exciting, and I wanted them to support Because I Am a Girl to help girls and give them a chance at a better future.” 

The sneakers are priced at $75.

Mo’ne, who is the first female pitcher to win a Little League World Series game, also inked a book and movie deal. The money from the book will be used to rebuild the 17th and Fitzwater field in Philly where she was discovered and still plays with her baseball team, the Anderson Monarchs. As for the movie, “It’s pretty much just like the book. It’s about my journey.” 

Go head girl!

Black girls’ sexual burden: Why Mo’ne Davis was really called a “slut”

“Just as I was harassed at 8 years old, baseball wunderkind Mo'ne Davis is a target of sexual shaming. Here’s why.

Mo’ne Davis is a Black girl wunderkind. At age 13, she has pitched a shutout at the Little League World Series, becoming the first girl ever to do so, and she has been on the cover of Sports Illustrated. Disney is now planning to do a movie about her called, “Throw Like Mo.”

I’m not ashamed to admit that I still watch the Disney Channel, and I will certainly be tuning in. But everyone isn’t as excited as I am to see a Black girl on the come up. Last week, Joey Casselberry, a sophomore baseball player from Bloomsburg University in Pennsylvania, called Mo’ne a “slut” in response to the news about the movie. He was subsequently expelled from the team.

In response, Davis has forgiven him and she and her coach have asked that he be reinstated. About Casselberry, Davis released a statement, which said:

Everyone makes mistakes and everyone deserves a second chance. I know he didn’t mean it in that type of way, and I know a lot of people get tired of like seeing me on TV but just think about what you’re doing before you actually do it. I know right now he’s really hurt and I know how hard he worked just to get where he is right now.

Her level of empathy is remarkable but not particularly surprising. Black girls learn almost from the womb to empathize with others, even when those others have committed deep injustices toward us.  Perhaps it is the unparalleled level of our suffering that makes us always look with empathy upon others.

But I am troubled. It is absolutely wonderful that Davis has this kind of care and concern and a heart so huge that she can forgive a nearly adult person for insulting her. It goes without saying that she’s a better person than Casselberry.

But she should not have to be. For starters, he meant what he said. One doesn’t slip up and mistakenly call a young teen girl a slut. Second, it bothers me that she sounds almost apologetic about how much others have to see her on television. Girls in our culture are taught that they should never take up too much space, that they should be seen (and look real pretty), but not heard. And Black girls in our culture are damn near invisible, whether in regards to their triumphs or their struggles.

Lest we think this inappropriate sexual shaming of Black girls is an isolated incident, let us not forget that in 2013, The Onion “jokingly” referred to then 9-year old actress Quvenzhané Wallis, as a “c*nt” in reference to her Oscar nomination that year for Beasts of the Southern Wild.

Such language is nothing short of vile and reprehensible. And it raises the question of why young white people have such a prurient fascination with young Black girls? Mo’ne Davis is 13. Quevenzhané Wallis is 11. One is a baseball player. The other is an actress. Why are they being characterized in sexual terms at any level?

The fact that Black girl artists and athletes are understood only in terms of a sexuality that they may not even have begun to articulate for themselves should concern us. That their sexuality is already being publicly circumscribed by white men (and the anonymous Onion tweeter) in dirty and shameful terms is appalling.

That invisibility of Black girl pain costs us our self-confidence, our emotional wellness, our livelihoods and sometimes our lives. And that is not a win. Mo’ne Davis deserves our love, our support, and our advocacy. Sexist and racist behavior is for losers. And we need to call it out, denounce it, dismantle it, and make space for Black girls to win.”

Read the full piece here <– IMPORTANT PIECE ALERT - READ THIS! 

Photo by Scott Roth/Invision/AP 

Mo'ne Davis leads her team to the Little League World Series

Davis will be the first American girl to play in Williamsport since 2004. She downplayed her personal accomplishment, but her pitching performance on national television showed that gender is no barrier.

“More girls should join boys’ teams so it could be a tradition and it wouldn’t be so special,” she said.

Photo: Philadelphia Inquirer

Thirteen-year-old sensation Mo'ne Davis, who plays for Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, has become the first Little Leaguer to grace the national cover of Sports Illustrated. The 5-foot-4 inch, 111-pound eighth grader is not only taking the Little League World Series by storm, but also she has captured the nation’s attention. 

SI STAFF: More information on Mo'ne Davis cover 
GALLERY: View all of SI’s 2014 Covers

 

Mamie (Peanut) Johnson, the only female pitcher in the history of the Negro Leagues, watches Mo’ne Davis hurl shutout in opener of Little League World Series

Johnson couldn’t miss seeing the debut of a kid who is believed to be the first African-American girl to play in the 75 years of youth baseball’s most storied tournament.

Let’s hear it for happy tears.