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They shall not pass! Stop the White Man March in Liverpool | Facebook
National Action, alongside other neo-nazi groups throughout the UK and Europe, will be marching this August in Liverpool.

On Saturday 15th August, neo-Nazis will attempt to march through Liverpool. The so-called “White Man March” - this time on its second outing - is organised primarily by members of neo-Nazi youth group National Action. It is supported by neo-Nazi groups from across Europe.

In March this year, the first “White Man March” took place in Newcastle. Around 100 neo-Nazis marched through the city before burning gay, communist and Israeli flags, screaming “Hitler was right” and sieg-heiling at counter-protestors. Although small compared to other far right protests, this was the largest and most explicit neo-Nazi march to take place in the UK since the eighties.

These events have been organised by people from an alliance of neo-Nazi groups. In Newcastle National Action were joined on the streets by the British Movement, Creativity Alliance, Misanthropic Division and National Rebirth of Poland. We expect the EDL splinter group North West Infidels to join this march. They have been responsible for attacks on picket lines, anti-fascists and Irish republican marches in Liverpool.

National Action members openly praise Hitler, trade anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and talk about their genocidal fantasies. Liverpool resident and National Action member Garron Helm was jailed for sending anti-Semitic abuse to MP Luciana Berger.

While some far-right groups have tried to moderate their public face, National Action revel in their blatant Nazism. These groups are growing as other parts of the far right collapse. Although they are nearly all tiny by themselves, the numbers they can bring out for the “White Man March” are worrying.

Liverpool, as a city with a proud left-wing tradition, has been chosen to demonstrate the “strength” of the neo-Nazi movement. We expect to see more than the 100 they brought to Newcastle and if we want to stop their growth they must be opposed. In 2013 we saw 5000 people march against fascist Nick Griffin and we need to draw on the city’s anti-fascist roots when the “White Man March” comes to town.

History has shown that Nazis need to be confronted head on, so they don’t have the space to spread their racist bile and grow in size and confidence. Given the chance, they will attack workers’ organisations, ethnic minorities, LGBT people and anyone else they perceive as their enemy. We are calling on anti-fascists across the North West to stand with the people of Liverpool in opposing these Nazi thugs.

They shall not pass!

PSA FOR PEOPLE IN THE NORTH WEST OF ENGLAND

Listen up all my non-white, Jewish/Muslim/non-christian friends! And most probably lgbt+ amigos!

THERE IS A NEO-NAZI MARCH BEING PLANNED ON 15TH AUGUST IN LIVERPOOL.

Currently there is a petition to get it stopped, I’m on mobile rn but when I get onto my laptop I will link you to it.

If, in the event that it can’t be stopped, please please please be careful! We know how violent this kind of vermin can get so if you cannae avoid Liverpool at all that day, please take all precautions to keep yourself safe. The police will be there to keep them in line but I know from experience these guys swarm in massive groups and also turn up drunk/drinking. It’s not uncommon for them to attack policemen/police animals and anyone they perceive to be a ‘white traitor’ or someone who doesn’t fit in with their ideals.

Love you all and stay safe xxx


EDIT: Here’s the link to the petition https://www.change.org/p/chief-constable-sir-jon-murphy-of-merseyside-police-exercise-his-powers-under-section-14-of-the-public-order-act-1986-to-restrict-the-planned-neo-nazi-demonstration-in-liverpool-on-15-august-2015?recruiter=136853865&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink

radicalrevolutionarysocialist asked:

Hey comrade, congrats on your success in Melbourne against the fascists! Sorry to hear that the pigs (cops) unleashed the pepper spray again :/

yeah, hardly surprising they’d go to that length to ensure the nazis had a pleasant march around the city though. i heard you outnumbered hem in adelaide as well! brilliant effort!!

“You’re fired” is likely what Donald Trump will say to the “young intern” who tweeted this faux pas

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s campaign says “the intern did it” — it being the Tuesday tweet of a steely-eyed Trump faded into the background of an American flag alongside equally faded $100 bills and marching Nazi reenactors all #makingAmericagreatagain.

The silhouetted Nazis were pointed out by John Schindler on Twitter, who said he was “100% certain Waffen-SS ID on the Trump pic.” The Hill noted that Schindler was a former professor at the Naval War College and retired intelligence official.

The Hill wrote that other historians confirmed Schindler’s suspicion.

Some extra leg work on this done elsewhere revealed the stock photo source of the marching Nazis.

Found @realDonaldTrump’s german soldier stock image here (searched “world war II soldiers”) http://t.co/GKkcNTUKpm http://pic.twitter.com/ysWGeePZIr

— Reed F. Richardson (@reedfrich) July 14, 2015

The original tweet has since been deleted, but has been screenshotted.

Twitter/@realDonaldTrump

Confirming this as a faux pas, the tweet was deleted from the account an hour later and the Trump campaign attributed the mistake to a “young intern” who may hear the words “you’re fired” in the coming days.

Trump campaign responds: An intern did it. http://pic.twitter.com/oZBJAtwffl

— Eric Geller (@ericgeller) July 14, 2015

(H/T Mother Jones)



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I really am not a pacifist

I mean…I think war is horrible, and I spent much of my childhood reading about WWII.

But maybe that’s part of it, because I just can’t see meeting the Nazis with marches and sticking flowers in their guns. Not that they’d probably let you get close enough to stick a flower in their gun without killing you.

I guess I think violence is okay for self-defense. Sometimes you’re up against other humans who give you no choice, who will kill you if you don’t kill them.

I don’t feel like it’s the moral reasoning part of my brain saying that it’s okay to pick up a gun and some friends and go defend yourselves against violent attack. It’s the evolved to survive part of my brain saying that. 

And sometimes the more primitive parts of your brain are worth listening to, I think. The moral reasoning part of my brain says “Yeah, I think I agree with Lizard Brain here, because if you can stop people who are bent on massive destruction and death by shooting them, shoot them.”

Of course the moral reasoning also puts limits on that, like it has to be a direct threat and you have to actually be shooting at the people who are into genocide and oppression. My moral reasoning is not at all cool with things like the War on Terror - i.e. killing lots of innocent people who pose no threat. No ‘breaking a few eggs to make an omelet” here. 

But things like the Libyan revolution (which I still support, and I need to go check on the Libyans I follow on Twitter and see how they’re doing now and what their thoughts on the current situation there are) and these Kurdish women I’ve been reblogging, and the armed resistance in Nazi occupied countries in WWII - I can support those things morally.

Why Republicans are talking about the Holocaust and Joseph McCarthy

If it seems like the Republican presidential candidates are getting a little more outlandish in recent days, there’s a very good reason: Their first debate is less than two weeks away, and not everyone will make the cut.

Only the candidates polling in the top 10 will win a coveted spot on the stage. And even for those who seem like safe bets to earn a spot, pumping up poll numbers is a good way to define and strengthen their position heading into the August 6 Fox debate in Cleveland.

That helps explain why Rick Perry spent an entire speech likening Donald Trump to cancer and Joseph McCarthy, Ted Cruz called Mitch McConnell a liar on the Senate floor, and Mike Huckabee, who has lost ground in the polls, compared President Barack Obama to a Nazi who would “march [Israelis] to the door of the oven” because he and other world leaders struck a nuclear deal with Iran.

“The unprecedented politics of a crowded, competitive field bottle-necked in an unworkable but critical juncture compels such a strategic imperative,” said Mary Matalin, who was a top adviser to President George H. W. Bush but has not endorsed any of the GOP candidates for 2016. “It is necessary but will prove to be insufficient.”

They all have to find a way to stay in the game, whether it’s pure name recognition or zeroing in on small pockets of support in ways that could be problematic for them later in the primary season or in a general election.

The Perry approach

Rick Perry’s is the most ingenious of the mad-as-hell plays. If Trump is going to be divisive — and much of the Republican Party finds him repugnant — there may be a way to build a constituency by being the most vehement Trump-basher. That’s not easy to do. South Carolina Sen. Lindsay Graham called Trump a “jackass” after Trump said he wasn’t impressed by John McCain getting captured during the Vietnam War. But Perry found a way.

“Donald Trump’s candidacy is a cancer on conservatism, and it must be clearly diagnosed, excised, and discarded,” Perry said last week. In the same speech, he invoked the famous shaming of McCarthy, the anti-Communist witch hunter of the Red Scare 1950s, by Army General Counsel Joseph Welch.

When a candidate under the Republican banner would abandon the tradition of magnanimous leadership of the presidency, when he would seek to demonize millions of citizens, when he would stoop to attack POWs for being captured, I can only ask as Senator Welch did of Senator McCarthy: ‘Have you no sense of decency, sir?’

Here’s why Perry’s approach is so smart: He’s not saying anything that would disqualify him from serious consideration for the presidency. Right now, he’s ranked 11th in the RealClearPolitics average of national polls at 2 percent. Perhaps he’ll get that late-poll bump that ensures he gets a chance to redeem himself from his 2012 debate performance.

Huckabee and the Holocaust

Over the weekend, Mike Huckabee broke the iron rule of winning debates: He compared something to the Holocaust. When you bring up Hitler or the Nazis, you lose. But, as my colleague Max Fisher brilliantly points out, there are two pretty definable constituencies for his position.

The first, in an irony that should be troubling to anyone who doesn’t think the destruction of Israel and the obliteration of the Jewish people are Obama’s goals, is pro-Israel Jewish hard-liners. The Israeli government has invoked the Holocaust to describe the deal, which proponents believe will protect Israel from the prospect of an Iranian bomb. Even if you believe Obama is naive and walking into a trap, his actions are a far cry from Hitler’s methodical attempt to exterminate the Jewish people.

The second is Huckabee’s traditional base of evangelical Christians, many of whom are as strident about Israel as hawkish Jews.

Huckabee is likely to get a ticket to the debate. But he’s lost ground in polls since Trump’s entry. He was pretty consistently in the low double digits in May and now finds himself with a RealClearPolitics average of 6 percent. Given his Holocaust remarks, it seems likely that he’ll get a chance to make his case on Israel at the first debate and perhaps improve his standing.

Cruz’s brand management

Cruz is turning a potential liability into a fight that could strengthen his standing with Republican activists.

Senate action on a highway bill last week represented a real threat to Cruz’s brand — not because of the base legislation, but because McConnell set the table to use it as a vehicle for reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank, which backs loans and loan guarantees to help foreign purchasers buy American goods. Cruz has been a leading critic of the bank, which is a pet issue for many economic conservatives.

To keep his brand intact, Cruz had to explain why the bank reauthorization slipped past him. His charge: McConnell lied.

What we just saw today was an absolute demonstration that not only what he told every Republican senator, but what he told the press over and over and over again, was a simple lie. … We know now that when the majority leader looks us in the eyes and makes an explicit commitment, that he is willing to say things that he knows are false. That has consequences for how this body operates.

Cruz is facing a serious backlash from fellow senators for abrogating the decorum of the Senate and for generally being a pain their necks. But that actually turns the Ex-Im Bank into a win-win for Cruz: He gets more attention for wanting to kill it, and he can present himself, yet again, as an outsider at war with the GOP establishment in Washington. Given that he’s sitting deep in the pack of presidential hopefuls, he could use a burst of enthusiasm from activists.

More from vox.com:

youtube

(via Genius sousaphone player gives marching neo-Nazis their own goofy soundtrack)


i laugh so hard at this i think i’m gonna die

New Post has been published on Claire Magazine

Published On Claire Magazine @ - http://blog.clairepeetz.com/groups-clash-during-confederate-flag-rallies-in-south-carolina/

Groups Clash During Confederate Flag Rallies in South Carolina

COLUMBIA, S.C. (Reuters) – At least five people were arrested on Saturday as white-supremacist and African-American groups clashed outside the South Carolina state house, where the Confederate battle flag was removed last week after a half-century, authorities said.

Beginning at noon, a Florida-based group called Black Educators for Justice demonstrated on the north side of the capitol. Tensions rose quickly when a column of about 50 white supremacists, many carrying Confederate flags and one a Nazi flag, marched toward the south steps of the capitol at 3:15 p.m.

Lines of state police separated them from a large crowd that jeered and booed. When the group reached the state house lawn, a scuffle broke out, and police moved in quickly to keep the fight from spreading.

While no further violence broke out, the atmosphere, on a day when temperatures neared 100 degrees, remained tense. Several times, police had to separate people shouting obscenities at one another.

Ambulances took seven people to hospitals, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement that provided no information on the severity of the injuries. No police officers were hurt, it said.

Racial and cultural tensions have peaked in South Carolina since the shootings last month of nine African-Americans in a historic Charleston church. Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white man charged in the killings, appeared to have been heavily influenced by such symbols as the Confederate battle flag.

Before the rally, a North Carolina-based chapter of the Ku Klux Klan announced that it would demonstrate outside the capitol. But the group that occupied the south side steps, shouting “white power,” carried the banner of a Detroit-based group called the National Socialist Movement Party, which the Southern Poverty Law Center says is “the largest and most prominent neo-Nazi group in the United States.”

The crowd reached about 2,000 people at its peak, said Lieutenant Kelley Hughes of the state Department of Public Safety. Hughes said in late afternoon that authorities were still compiling information about the arrests, charges and injuries.

The Confederate battle flag has been a flashpoint for racial tensions for decades. Its supporters say it is a symbol of Southern heritage, while opponents argue the banner represents slavery and racism. This month, the state legislature voted to remove the flag from the State House grounds, where it had flown since 1961.

In Richmond, Virginia, more than 100 members of Confederate heritage groups converged on the state capitol grounds to blast efforts to remove the Confederate battle flag out of what they say is “political correctness.”

“We’re sick and tired of the PC attacks to eradicate our heritage,” said Susan Hathaway, a founder of the Virginia Flaggers, a group known for erecting massive Confederate flags on Interstate highways in Virginia.

The flag’s meaning was a main topic of conversation—and argument—during the Columbia rallies as well.

Ray Johnson, a 55-year-old white man, waved the Confederate flag during the Black Educators rally and found himself in a heated discussion with Mike Scarborough, a 37-year-old black man.

“It’s a tribute to the people, women, children and animals who died for that cause, whether that cause was right or wrong. And I’ve already told you I think it was wrong,” Johnson told Scarborough.

Afterward, Scarborough said he thinks Johnson is sincere but misguided. “My point to him was, it’s not like you’re carrying photos of the soldiers who died or of a cemetery. You have a symbol of the whole system,” Scarborough said. “You can’t separate the two.”

Via:: http://www.newsweek.com/groups-clash-confederate-flag-rallies-355213

Http//blog.clairepeetz.com

Flag dispute triggers clash at South Carolina capitol

By Greg Lacour COLUMBIA, S.C. (Reuters) - At least five people were arrested on Saturday as white-supremacist and African-American groups clashed outside the South Carolina State House, where the Confederate battle flag was removed last week after a half-century, authorities said. Tensions rose quickly when a column of about 50 white supremacists, many carrying Confederate flags and one a Nazi flag, marched toward the south steps of the capitol at 3:15 p.m. Lines of state police separated them from a large crowd that jeered and booed. When the group reached the State House lawn, a scuffle broke out, and police moved in quickly to keep the fight from spreading. http://dlvr.it/BZ9dsC

By Greg Lacour COLUMBIA, S.C. (Reuters) - At least five people were arrested on Saturday as white-supremacist and African-American groups clashed outside the South Carolina State House, where the Confederate battle flag was removed last week after a half-century, authorities said. Tensions rose quickly when a column of about 50 white supremacists, many carrying Confederate flags and one a Nazi flag, marched toward the south steps of the capitol at 3:15 p.m. Lines of state police separated them from a large crowd that jeered and booed. When the group reached the State House lawn, a scuffle broke out, and police moved in quickly to keep the fight from spreading.

Flag dispute triggers clash at South Carolina capitol

By Greg Lacour

COLUMBIA, S.C. (Reuters) - At least five people were arrested on Saturday as white-supremacist and African-American groups clashed outside the South Carolina State House, where the Confederate battle flag was removed last week after a half-century, authorities said.

Beginning at noon, a Florida-based group called Black Educators for Justice demonstrated on the north side of the capitol. Tensions rose quickly when a column of about 50 white supremacists, many carrying Confederate flags and one a Nazi flag, marched toward the south steps of the capitol at 3:15 p.m.

Lines of state police separated them from a large crowd that jeered and booed. When the group reached the State House lawn, a scuffle broke out, and police moved in quickly to keep the fight from spreading.

While no further violence broke out, the atmosphere, on a day when temperatures neared 100 degrees, remained tense. Several times, police had to separate people shouting obscenities at one another.

Ambulances took seven people to hospitals, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement that provided no information on the severity of the injuries. No police officers were hurt, it said.

Racial and cultural tensions have peaked in South Carolina since the shootings last month of nine African-Americans in a historic Charleston church. Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white man charged in the killings, appeared to have been heavily influenced by such symbols as the Confederate battle flag.

Before the rally, a North Carolina-based chapter of the Ku Klux Klan announced that it would demonstrate outside the capitol. But the group that occupied the south side steps, shouting “white power,” carried the banner of a Detroit-based group called the National Socialist Movement Party, which the Southern Poverty Law Center says is “the largest and most prominent neo-Nazi group in the United States.”

The crowd reached about 2,000 people at its peak, said Lieutenant Kelley Hughes of the state Department of Public Safety. Hughes said in late afternoon that authorities were still compiling information about the arrests, charges and injuries.

The Confederate battle flag has been a flashpoint for racial tensions for decades. Its supporters say it is a symbol of Southern heritage, while opponents argue the banner represents slavery and racism. This month, the state legislature voted to remove the flag from the State House grounds, where it had flown since 1961.

In Richmond, Virginia, more than 100 members of Confederate heritage groups converged on the state capitol grounds to blast efforts to remove the Confederate battle flag out of what they say is “political correctness.”

“We’re sick and tired of the PC attacks to eradicate our heritage,” said Susan Hathaway, a founder of the Virginia Flaggers, a group known for erecting massive Confederate flags on Interstate highways in Virginia.

The flag’s meaning was a main topic of conversation - and argument - during the Columbia rallies as well.

Ray Johnson, a 55-year-old white man, waved the Confederate flag during the Black Educators rally and found himself in a heated discussion with Mike Scarborough, a 37-year-old black man.

“It’s a tribute to the people, women, children and animals who died for that cause, whether that cause was right or wrong. And I’ve already told you I think it was wrong,” Johnson told Scarborough.

Afterward, Scarborough said he thinks Johnson is sincere but misguided. “My point to him was, it’s not like you’re carrying photos of the soldiers who died or of a cemetery. You have a symbol of the whole system,” Scarborough said. “You can’t separate the two.”

(Additional reporting by Gary Robertson in Richmond, Virginia; Editing by Frank McGurty and Jonathan Oatis)