native-american-nations

What I think Tommy Oliver will be like in the sequel.

Tommy will be a female, Native American/First Nation

…and will be a bit of a jerk.

Now, before you get pissed off at me, hear me out.

Usually, Tommy is depicted as constantly switching sides and being a badass loner sort of character, so I think to update the character, she will sort of be more violent and aggressive to separate her from the others. She’s the only one of them who doesn’t want to change her personality.

After she somehow finds the green power coin, she joins the team and helps them fight off some baddies. She will completely be in love with her powers and go crazy with them, maybe getting a bit out of control. The others begin to get annoyed by her, Trini especially, so they try to find her and talk to her at her house. 

They walk over but before they can walk inside the house, they hear Tommy shouting with her parents, getting into an argument that eventually gets..violent.

It will be revealed that she’s going through some tough sh#t at home and the reason she acts like a jerk is because she wants control of her own life and fighting and bullying is the only way to get control.

The others sympathize with her, especially Trini, and don’t bring it up, acting nicer to her and bonding to her. However, Rita somehow returns or some other villain appears and tempts Tommy to join the dark side. Tommy doesn’t trust the villain but somehow, another confrontation with the Rangers (maybe Tommy accidently nearly kills one of their parents during a fight scene) turns her to the dark side.

In the final act, she’s fighting the Rangers but eventually comes back to their side and defeats the villain in a giant freaking Dragon zord.

And the movie will end with her finally getting along with the group.

@ white people who think wearing eagle feather headdresses is just a costume and doesn’t offend natives, I was at a powwow yesterday and one of the dancer’s who was a war veteran accidentally dropped an eagle feather while dancing and we had to stop the entire powwow, the head man and some other elders had to stop and pray over the feather before picking it up. The guy who dropped the father gave a speech, while almost in tears, about how sorry he was to have dropped the feather and how it represented the choices he had to make in combat and the lives of people that were taken, and he ended up passing the feather on to another young dancer instead of keeping it because he felt so ashamed. This is how much eagle feathers mean to a lot of our nations, and that’s how important it is to native veterans. Wearing eagle feathers as a costume or without having to go through combat is disgusting and you ARE offending our traditions and values. Stop. You cannot understand the importance of our customs and you do not deserve to wear eagle feathers.

Because I never see these

Native Girls are beautiful.
Native Boys are beautiful.
First Nations Girls are beautiful.
First Nations Boys are beautiful.
Indigenous Girls are beautiful.
Indigenous Boys are beautiful.
Aboriginal Girls are beautiful.
Aboriginal Boys are beautiful.
Inuit Girls are beautiful.
Inuit Boys are beautiful.
Métis Girls are beautiful.
Métis Boys are beautiful.
Aleut Girls are beautiful.
Aleut Boys are beautiful.
Afro-Indigenous Girls are beautiful.
Afro-Indigenous Boys are beautiful.
Mi'kmaq girls are beautiful.
Mi'kmaq boys are beautiful.
Two-Spirit Girls are beautiful.
Two-Spirit Boys are beautiful.
You’re beautiful if you have dark skin.
You’re beautiful if you have light skin.
You’re beautiful if you’re in between.
You’re beautiful if you’re mixed.
You’re beautiful if you’re neither gender.
You’re beautiful if you’re both genders.
You’re beautiful.


(Aboriginal, Inuit, and Métis lines added by @phaedragona. Two-Spirit lines added by many people. Afro-Indigenous and Mixed lines added by @condorofrph. Aleut lines added by anonymous. Mi'kmaq lines added by @kennachaos . If there’s anyone I’ve left out, feel free to add on to it and/or message me and I’ll change the original post.

reuters.com
Canada oil pipeline spills 200,000 liters on aboriginal land

A pipeline in the western Canadian province of Saskatchewan has leaked 200,000 liters (52,834 gallons) of oil in an aboriginal community, the provincial government said on Monday.

The government was notified late in the afternoon on Friday, and 170,000 liters have since been recovered, said Doug McKnight, assistant deputy minister in the Ministry of the Economy, which regulates pipelines in Saskatchewan.

Oil pipelines are viewed by the oil-rich provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan as a critical lifeline to move crude to the coast, but they have drawn fierce opposition from environmental and indigenous groups.

The spill came seven months after another major incident in Saskatchewan, in which a Husky Energy Inc pipeline leaked 225,000 liters into a major river and cut off the drinking water supply for two cities.

It was not immediately clear how the current incident happened or which company owns the underground pipeline that leaked the oil.

McKnight said Tundra Energy Marketing Inc, which has a line adjacent to the spill, is leading cleanup efforts.

“There are a number of pipes in the area,” he told reporters in Regina. “Until we excavate it, we won’t know with 100-percent certainty which pipe.”

Tundra, a privately held unit of Canadian grain trading and energy conglomerate James Richardson and Sons Ltd, released a statement saying it is cooperating with all levels of government and will ensure “the affected land is restored appropriately.”

The incident happened in the lands of the Ocean Man First Nation 140 km (87 miles) southeast of the provincial capital of Regina, according to the province.

McKnight said the spill has been contained in the low-lying area in which it was discovered. Ocean Man Chief Connie Big Eagle said the spill was 15 meters (50 feet) in diameter on Friday.

Ocean Man has 540 residents, one-third of whom live on the reserve, Big Eagle said.

She said an area resident who had smelled the scent of oil for a week located the spill and alerted her on Friday. The chief said there are no homes near the spill but it is about 400 meters (1,320 feet) from the local cemetery.

“We have got to make sure that Tundra has done everything that they can to get our land back to the way it was. That can take years,” she said. “They have assured me that they follow up and they don’t leave … until we are satisfied.”

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NYC Prayer March for #StandingRock: Indigenous people and allies gathered in front of the National Museum of the American Indian in downtown Manhattan to show their support and solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Nation. #NoDAPL #StandwithStandingRock #NativeLivesMatter 

Support Native Americans

•support dark skinned natives
•support light skinned natives
•support white passing natives
•support natives whose first languages are their tribal languages
•support natives who cannot speak their tribal language
•support native children who have to teach themselves about their tribal culture
•support natives living on reservations
•support native kids who get asked if their parents live on a reservation
•support native kids who are taught to be embarrassed and ashamed of their heritage
•support métis people who might not know their heritage
•support métis people who aren’t native passing
•support native people who stick to traditional hair and dress styles
•support natives who practice their tribal religion
•support natives who follow mainstream fashion
•support natives who are told they’re “too Indian”
•support natives who are told they’re “not Indian enough”

•but above all, listen to what we have to say about our cultures, our histories, our future, our issues and our people.

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NYC Prayer March for #StandingRock: Indigenous people and allies marched throughout the streets of Manhattan to show their support and solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Nation. #NoDAPL #StandwithStandingRock #NativeLivesMatter 

PEOPLE HAVE NO OBLIGATION TO SHARE THEIR CULTURE WITH YOU.

Just something to keep in mind before you get on your little soap box about how ‘blending cultures will end racism!’ or whatever nonsense you want to use to speak over actual PoC so you can wear bindis or warbonnets or wear blackface.

Unless they welcome you into their culture, you are NOT welcomed into that culture. You don’t get to go into someone else’s home and start calling the shots.

Bird mask of the Tsimshian people, used in initiation ceremonies.  Artist unknown; 19th century.  Collected in Nisga’a territory at the mouth of the Nass River, British Columbia, Canada; now in the Louvre.

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Seven years ago, the Navajo tribal council in southeastern Utah started mapping the secret sites where medicine men and women forage for healing plants and Native people source wild foods. They wanted to make a case for protecting the landscape known as Bears Ears, a place sacred not only to their tribe but to many other tribes in the region, going back thousands of years. In one of his final acts in office, President Obama late last month created the 1.35 million-acre Bears Ears National Monument, a move that proponents say will safeguard the area’s ecology and guarantee food sovereignty for the region’s Native Americans.

“Up to 20,000 Natives of various tribes live within 45 minutes of Bears Ears, including 10,000 Navajos that live just across the border in Arizona,” says Gavin Noyes, director of the Utah Diné Bikéyah, the Navajo nonprofit that developed the initial draft of the monument proposal in 2013. “It’s one of the wildest, most intact landscapes in Utah.”

About 16,000 people live in San Juan County, where Bears Ears is located. Roughly half are Navajo, and many in the tribe lack running water and electricity, says Noyes. But the land still provides.

Bears Ears Monument Is A Win For Tribal Food Sovereignty. Will Trump Undo It?

Photos: Josh Ewing/Courtesy of Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition

this is for the native girls who were adopted. this is for the native girls who live on a reservation. this is for the lesbian native girls. this is for the trans native girls. this is for the light-skinned native girls. this is for the dark-skinned native girls. this is for the native girls who will never know they’re identity. this is for the native girls who can’t speak their native language. this is for the native girls that do speak their native language. this is for the fat native girls. this is for the skinny native girls. this is for the native girls who are uncomfortable in their own body & skin. this is for the native girls who are confident in their own body & skin. this is for the native girls who have health issues. this is for the native girls who have a mental illness. this is for the native girls who are bad at school. this is for all native girls. you matter & you deserve better.

youtube

HEY EVERYONE

WATCH THIS GREAT DOCUMENTARY ABOUT CHEROKEE

LANGUAGE REVITALIZATION IS SUPER COOL

IT’S ONLY AN HOUR IT’S COMPLETELY FREE IT WON AN EMMY YOU’RE GONNA LOVE IT

Official description:

First Language - The Race to Save Cherokee chronicles the efforts of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to preserve and revitalize the Cherokee Language. The native languages of North American indigenous peoples are a vessel of subtle knowledge, folkways, and psychology at the heart of Native identity. Most indigenous languages of North America are critically endangered and many are already extinct. Cherokee is an Iroquoian language with an estimated 12,000 speakers living mainly in Oklahoma and North Carolina.

First Language is a production of the The Language and Life Project at NC State University, produced by Danica Cullinan, Neal Hutcheson, and Walt Wolfram. The film is made available in celebration of Native American Heritage month and will remain online for high-definition, ad-free viewing. The Language and Life Project is a non-profit, public education initiative founded by Walt Wolfram in the 1990s, with an ongoing mission to celebrate and promote an understanding of linguistic and cultural diversity.

Keep reading

These are the 37 banks that are funding and supporting DAPL.

Women’s March is calling for people to cancel their accounts and credit lines with these creditors in opposition to their support of harming, oppressing, and stealing from Native Americans.

DAPL BANKS:

Wells Fargo

Citibank (CitiGroup)

JPMorgan Chase

PNC Bank

Goldman Sachs

Morgan Stanley

HSBC Bank

Bank of America

Deutsche Bank

BNP Paribas

SunTrust

The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ

Mizuho Bank

TD Securities

Credit Agricole

Intesa SanPaolo

ING Bank

Natixis

BayernLB

BBVA Securities

DNB Capital

ICBC London

SMBC Nikko Securities

Societe Generale

Royal Bank of Scotland
ABN Amro Capital

Bank of Nova Scotia (Scotiabank)

Citizens Bank

Comerica Bank

U.S. Bank

Barclays

Compass Bank

Credit Suisse

DNB Capital/ASA

Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

Royal Bank of Canada

UBS

At a quick glance, you might miss the ancient cliff dwellings that blend effortlessly into the sheltered alcove of the canyon wall at Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. These elaborate stone communities contained as many as 150 rooms, some of which still feature smoke-blackened walls and ceilings from fires that burned during cold winter months. The park protects nearly 5,000 archeological sites, inspiring visitors to imagine what life was like over 700 years ago. Photo courtesy of Chris Wheeler.

Another Native-led pipeline battle bubbles up in New Jersey. (From Grist)

The Ramapough Lunaape Nation has spurred the charge against the proposed 178-mile Pilgrim pipeline, which would transport Bakken crude oil from Albany, New York, to New Jersey’s Linden Harbor. The pipeline would cut through forests and a critical drinking water reservoir.

Last week, the town of Mahwah, New Jersey, issued summonses against the Ramapough Lunaape for establishing a campground and protest signs without permits — even though they’re on tribal land.

Unlike the federally recognized Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the Ramapough Lunaape Nation is only recognized by New Jersey and New York. The federal government isn’t bound by the same obligations to non-recognized tribes, meaning this fight is more complicated than the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance.

In 1993, the nation’s bid for federal recognition crumbled — thanks in part to Donald Trump, who campaigned against the Ramapough Lunaape to stamp out potential casino competition in Atlantic City.

This isn’t the nation’s first brush with environmental racism by a long shot. In the mid-20th century, Ford Motor Company dumped thousands of tons of toxic paint sludge on Ramapough ancestral land — the same land Pilgrim could trespass. The area became a Superfund site after years of soaring cases of cancer and birth defects within the community.

Getting really sick of white people like Bill Maher telling their white friends and fans shit like “Real Indians aren’t even offended by mascots!” 

First of all, who the fuck are you? 

Second of all, this just REEKS of manipulative bullshit. Like I hear things like this and it just translates to, “You don’t want to be one of THOSE Indians that are offended, right? YOU’RE not angry or overly sensitive or PC, are you? You’re one of the cool ones, right?” 

White people need to learn to step the fuck off.