native,

Judge ruling means Urban Outfitters could pay Navajo Nation millions

Philadelphia-based retailer Urban Outfitters could potentially have to pay millions of dollars for using the word “Navajo” in its products.

A federal judge in Arizona ruled last week that the Navajo Nation did not delay the filing of its trademark infringement lawsuit against Urban Outfitters – a tactic the retail giant claimed had occurred since the tribe first took legal action in 2012, or about 11 years after the company began using “Navajo” to describe its products, according to the Albuquerque Journal.

The tribe has not named a specific dollar amount that it seeks in damages, however it could soar into the millions if a court rules in their favor.

On some claims, the tribe wants all the profits generated from the Navajo-themed sales. On others, it wants $1,000 per day per item, or three times the profit generated by marketing and retail of products using the name. Lindsay DeMoss, one of a handful of attorneys listed for Urban Outfitters, declined to comment. The company had said in court documents that granting the tribe a monetary windfall for a situation it created with unexplained silence “would be inequitable and unjust.”

The Navajo Nation has spent nearly four years in a legal battle with Urban Outfitters for alleged trademark infringement, violations of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, and other allegations.

Source

15 things JK Rowling could include to treat Native people and culture respectfully:

1.       Don’t make the centerpiece of the story about a boarding school. If you’re white you probably don’t know this but, boarding schools were used to genocide Natives for centuries.

2.       Bother to do some research on the cultures you’re trying to write about. Natives are not simple. They are complex and deep. In some ways much more so than the European colonizers.

3.       Natives had the most advanced and sophisticated government structures in the world at the time. International war laws, reverse hierarchical federalized democracies, independent economic entities, the clan systems, the most expansive road and trade networks in the world, the list goes on just do some reading.

4.       Don’t diminish or dismiss the natives as backward or simple in the fiction either. JKR decided that natives don’t use wands for magic and stuff because they don’t do specific or focused magic, that’s racist nonsense.

5.       Natives would do some wild shit like Onondaga fire magic or Aztec surgical stuff. There were Mixtec oracles and mystics who cut the flesh from their face and replaced it with gems, that shit is metal.

6.       The wand thing could be replaced with turquoise gem totems, or obsidian magic knives or some shit like that. Taking the tools away from them is dehumanizing imagery.

7.       Don’t mess around with pipes or anything like that. You’re white JKR, you’re white.

8.       If you have a character run away into the woods in Massachusetts, she is gonna run right into Native cities. Don’t pretend that America is this open uninhabited nature reserve. That wasn’t true and it is racist.

9.       Don’t pretend that American societies are going to be as backward and prejudiced as other places. Most American languages didn’t have gendered pronouns. American cultures did not have the institutional patriarchal bullshit or homophobia. We would probably be pretty accepting of people that could do magic.

10.   There should be magical clans… that sounds dope.

11.   There should be magical schools already and there could be a really cool plot about protecting them from the Spanish and the English.

12.   They should not be schools as much as campus communities, workshops instead of classes. The predecessors to the Cherokee would create communities and give them a purpose, which was a practice common throughout North America. There would be a half-dozen schools the size of massive cities centered around dope pyramids like Cahokia.

13.   Magic using medicine men would come to villages to teach the citizens that couldn’t leave or something like that.

14.   Instead of skinwalkers which are too specific and appropriationy, try something like the Witiko, which is about cannibalism and evil deeds freezing your heart or something (fluctuates according to region). Could very easily be related to evil magic users.

15.   The basic thing I think is to do some research and maybe ask some natives before you try shit like this.

To be clear for some white people who think I’m being sensitive or something. First off, fuck you, the second thing is JK Rowling is trying to make a shit ton of money with this. And she will so she should at least not contribute to the immolation and genocide of Native peoples at the same time.

Because I never see these

Native Girls are beautiful.
Native Boys are beautiful.
First Nations Girls are beautiful.
First Nations Boys are beautiful.
Indigenous Girls are beautiful.
Indigenous Boys are beautiful.
You’re beautiful if you have dark skin.
You’re beautiful if you have light skin.
You’re beautiful if you’re in between.
You’re beautiful.

this is for the native girls who were adopted. this is for the native girls who live on a reservation. this is for the lesbian native girls. this is for the trans native girls. this is for the light-skinned native girls. this is for the dark-skinned native girls. this is for the native girls who will never know they’re identity. this is for the native girls who can’t speak their native language. this is for the native girls that do speak their native language. this is for the fat native girls. this is for the skinny native girls. this is for the native girls who are uncomfortable in their own body & skin. this is for the native girls who are confident in their own body & skin. this is for the native girls who have health issues. this is for the native girls who have a mental illness. this is for the native girls who are bad at school. this is for all native girls. you matter & you deserve better.

10

Girls Show What Beauty Looks Like When It’s Not Appropriated

I am African American. The reason I wear my hair in an Afro is because I think it expresses exactly who I am, where I come from, and the people who have paved the way for me. I found it very difficult to be myself because there are a lot of stereotypes and misconceptions about black people and black hair. We shouldn’t have to question wearing our natural hair to a job interview; I wish people just understood how strong and beautiful it is. 

4

Tennessee Congressional Candidate Has A Dream To ‘Make America White Again

Rick Tyler, a local businessman running in the heavily Republican district, has drawn sharp criticism for a pair of inflammatory signs near Highway 411 in Polk County: One that says “Make America White Again,” and another that invokes Martin Luther King Jr. and reads “I Have a Dream” over an image of the Capitol surrounded by Confederate flags.   

It was intended to elicit the idea in people’s minds of … what ‘Make America White Again’ could possibly mean. My quick response to that is the ‘Leave It to Beaver,’ ‘Ozzie and Harriet,’ ‘Mayberry’ America that I grew up in was a better America,

Tyler said, claiming that time had no “break-ins” or “Muslim sleeper cells,” had less immigration by people of color — and was so safe you could leave your doors unlocked.

“He wants to go back to the 1950s where whites are in control and blacks ‘know their place. He’s about as racist as you can get, from what I can tell.

Topher Kersting said [running as an independent] 


WTF?! Go back to what else? Jim Crow? The “good old days” when if a black person looked sideways at a white person, they were lynched? Separate but equal? 

If you aren’t offended by this message, you are what’s wrong with this country. #Hate it!

5

Hundreds of protesters from three tribes and their allies stopped construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline for the second day in a row Wednesday, but law enforcement and private security are now preparing to amp up their presence. Morton County deployed police, highway patrol and G4S personnel to dispel the gathering, reportedly bringing tear gas because of rumors that the protests were violent.

The $3.8 billion-project will funnel 500,000 barrels of crude per day from North Dakota to Illinois later this year. Members of the Sioux tribe have argued the pipeline will pollute drinking water as it crosses the Missouri and Little Missouri rivers and will disturb sacred sites.

The rivers are a water source for thousands of residents from the reservation and millions more downstream.

“Our Mother Earth is sacred. All things evolve and work together. To poison the water, is to poison the substance of life. Everything that moves must have water. How can we talk about and knowingly poison water?”

“You give them an inch, they take a mile,” 

Olowan Sara Martinez of the American Indian Movement

Many of the protesters have broadcast their messages on social media in an open call to other tribes to join in. “It’s in our history. We don’t wanna give them an inch. We don’t wanna give them a mile.”


Thank you for standing up, it’s not easy to fight big oil. #Love it! Sacred sights, clean water as it’s all life mean nothing to these cold blooded oil barons.