native habitat

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Jaguarundi

The jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi) or eyra cat is a small wild cat native to southern North America and South America. The jaguarundi has short legs, an elongated body, and a long tail. It has a total length of 21 to 30 inches with the tail taking 12-to-24 inches of that length, and weighs 7.7 to 20.1 pounds. The coat can be either blackish to brownish-grey (grey phase) or foxy red to chestnut (red phase); individuals of both phases can be born in the same litter. The two color phases were once thought to represent two distinct species: the grey one called jaguarundi, and the red one called eyra. The jaguarundi is closely related to the much larger and heavier cougar, having a similar genetic structure and chromosome count. 

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The world’s population of giraffes continues to decline at an alarming rate, with just under 100,000 individuals left in their native habitats. That is a decrease of nearly 40% over the last 20 years. These findings led the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to change giraffes’ status last year to Vulnerable, on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. For #WorldGiraffeDay, consider joining the fight to End Extinction. Let’s turn things around. (source)

axolotls are weird

  • the entire pet trade of axolotls comes from 6 sent to france decades ago
  • it’s a neotenic salamander and nobody knows why they don’t turn into normal salamanders naturally
  • you can give em an iodine shot and they’ll become salamanders
  • their native habitat is basically exactly where mexico city is right now, so they’re almost certainly extinct in the wild
  • but they are very smiley and don’t let that get them down!! 
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Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)

The spotted lanternfly is a planthopper native to China, India, and Vietnam. Although it has two pairs of wings, it jumps more than it flies. Its host plants are grapes, pines, stone fruits, and Malus spp. In its native habitat it is kept in check by natural predators or pathogens. It was accidentally introduced in Korea in 2006 and is since considered a pest. In September 2014, it was first spotted in the U.S..

photo credits: Sam Droege

pretty-love-ly  asked:

Isn't supporting bee keepers by buying honey kind of a good thing? Like its a double edged sword bc we shouldn't use animals as food and all but right now with the changing climate and GMO crops and colony collapse disorder it's killing off bees and we desperately need them, so isn't it a good thing that bee keepers are keeping bees alive?

Hi there pretty-love-ly!

We’ve been tricked into believing that honey is simply a byproduct of the essential pollination provided by farmed honeybees. Did you know though that the honeybee’s wild counterparts (such as bumblebees, carpenter and digger bees) are much better pollinators? They are also less likely than farmed honeybees to be affected by mites and Africanized bees. The issue is that these native bees can hibernate for up to 11 months out of the year and do not live in large colonies. Thus, they do not produce massive amounts of honey for a  $157 million dollar a year industry.

Honey and the Different Types of Bees

Honey bees: Honey bees make a large quantity of honey (possible due to the size of colonies – that is, many worker bees collecting nectar). Honey consists of nectar combined with a ‘bee enzyme’ that goes through a process of concentration in the honeycomb before it is capped by the bees.

Bumblebees: Bumblebees, in one sense, make a form of honey, which they collect in nectar pots to be eaten by the colony, including the newly hatched worker females. However, the process of concentrating, capping, and the making of honey combs does not happen in bumblebee colonies, nor is nectar stored over winter, since only the queen survives and hibernates, whilst the rest of the colony do not.

Solitary bees: Solitary bees do not make honeycombs. They construct egg cells which they provision with a ball of nectar and pollen that will be consumed by the new larvae.

Honey bees will pollinate many plant species that are not native to their natural habitat but are often inefficient pollinators of such plants.

The crops that can be only pollinated by honey bees are:

• Guar Bean
• Quince
• Lemon
• Lime
• Karite
• Tamarind

The crops that are pollinated by bees, in general, are:

• Apples
• Mangos
• Rambutan
• Kiwi Fruit
• Plums
• Peaches
• Nectarines
• Guava
• Rose Hips
• Pomegranites
• Pears
• Black and Red Currants
• Alfalfa
• Okra
• Strawberries
• Onions
• Cashews
• Cactus
• Prickly Pear
• Apricots
• Allspice
• Avocados
• Passion Fruit
• Lima Beans
• Kidney Beans
• Adzuki Beans
• Green Beans
• Orchid Plants
• Custard Apples
• Cherries
• Celery
• Coffee
• Walnut
• Cotton
• Lychee
• Flax
• Acerola – used in Vitamin C supplements
• Macadamia Nuts
• Sunflower Oil
• Goa beans
• Lemons
• Buckwheat
• Figs
• Fennel
• Limes
• Quince
• Carrots
• Persimmons
• Palm Oil
• Loquat
• Durian
• Cucumber
• Hazelnut
• Cantaloupe
• Tangelos
• Coriander
• Caraway
• Chestnut
• Watermelon
• Star Apples
• Coconut
• Tangerines
• Boysenberries
• Starfruit
• Brazil Nuts
• Beets
• Mustard Seed
• Rapeseed
• Broccoli
• Cauliflower
• Cabbage
• Brussels Sprouts
• Bok Choy (Chinese Cabbage)
• Turnips
• Congo Beans
• Sword beans
• Chili peppers, red peppers, bell peppers, green peppers
• Papaya
• Safflower
• Sesame
• Eggplant
• Raspberries
• Elderberries
• Blackberries
• Clover
• Tamarind
• Cocoa
• Black Eyed Peas
• Vanilla
• Cranberries
• Tomatoes
• Grapes

Check this chart to see which type of bees can pollinate those crops.

While you may spread a heaping tablespoon of honey on your morning toast without thinking, creating each drop is no small feat. To make one pound of honey, a colony must visit over two million flowers, flying over 55,000 miles, at up to 15 miles per hour to do so. During a bee’s lifetime, she will only make approximately one teaspoon of honey, which is essential to the hive for times when nectar is scarce, such as during winter. At times, there may be an excess in the hive, but this amount is difficult to determine and large-scale beekeepers often remove all or most of it and replace it with a sugar or corn syrup substitute. Can you imagine someone removing all the fruit juice from your house and replacing it with fruit-flavored soda? It may still give you energy, but eventually, it will probably make you sick.

BEES DIE FOR YOUR HONEY

Another thing to think about while you sit by your beeswax candle and contemplate the lives of these little fellows is that bees must consume approximately eight pounds of honey to produce each pound of wax! And the more we take from them (bee pollen, royal jelly, propolis) the harder these creatures must work and the more bees are needed, which isn’t good news for a population that is dwindling.

When you see a jar of honey, you may think of the sweet cartoon hives depicted in childhood stories such as Winnie the Pooh. But most hives are now confined to large boxes (a completely foreign shape to bees) that are jostled and shipped around the country to pollinate crops and produce honey. This is stressful and confusing to the bees’ natural navigation systems. Along the way, bees are lost and killed, and may spread diseases from one infected hive to another. The practice of bee farming often limits the bees’ diet to monoculture crops, introduces large amounts of pesticides into their systems and causes the farmed bees to crowd out the native wild pollinators that may have been otherwise present. Beekeepers (even small-scale backyard beekeepers) will also kill the queens if they feel the hive is in danger of swarming (fleeing their file cabinet shaped homes) or drones* that they deem unnecessary to honey production. * The drones’ main function is to fertilize the queen when needed.

We have got to the point where we mass exploit honeybees as pollinators to fix a problem that should be fixed from the roots and not partially.

“At certain times of the year, three or four trucks carrying beehives rumble along Highway 20 every week. Their destination: California, where the bees are required for pollination services. During my time in California researching dairy farms, I learned about an extraordinary consequence of intensive farming taken to extremes: industrialized pollination - a business that is rapidly expanding as the natural bee population collapses. In certain parts of the world, as a result of industrial farming, there are no longer enough bees to pollinate the crops. Farmers are forced to hire or rent them in”
— Farmagedon. The True Cost of Cheap Meat

The Case of the Disappearing Bees

The question of what will happen if bees disappear may not be far from being answered. Over the past couple of years, stories about bees disappearing and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) have been popping up in the The New York Times, Star Tribune, Huffington Post, PBS, Discovery News and more. If nothing else wakes us up, perhaps the fact that the disappearance of bees has become front page news will. Scientists are rushing to discover what’s causing this problem before it’s too late and before we lose the important environmental link created by bees.

Thus far, there are three main theories/contributing factors:

  • Pesticides

Pennsylvania State University published a study in 2010 that found “unprecedented levels” of pesticides in honeybees and hives in the United States. (If it’s in the bees and hives, what do you think is in your honey?) Some of these chemicals are killing bees, and guess what? The EPA knows about it.

“The EPA identifies two specific neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and clothianidin, as highly toxic to bees. Both chemicals cause symptoms in bees such as memory loss, navigation disruption, paralysis, and death.

Both chemicals have been linked to dramatic honeybee deaths and subsequent suspensions of their use in France and Germany. Several European countries have already suspended them. Last year Slovenia and Italy also suspended their use for what they consider a significant risk to honeybee populations.”

– Mother Earth News

This is old news; this story came out in 2009. But has anything changed here? Not as far as I can tell.

  • Mites and Viruses

With weakened immune systems (stress, inferior food sources, pesticides etc.) bees have become more susceptible to viruses, fungal infections, and mites. Many of these invasive bugs are spread as hives are moved around the country or transferred from country to country.

While there are a number of treatments on the market for the mites, viruses, fungus and other pests that are attacking our colonies, none have solved the problem completely. These treatments can also introduce antibiotics, pesticides and other chemicals into the hives in an attempt to prevent or heal the infection. If these chemicals (often on strips) are not removed from the hive after they lose potency, they can, in fact, help the viruses or mites become resistant to treatment in the future.

  • Cell phones

This is one of the newest theories on CCD and may need further testing.

“According to a Swiss researcher who recently published a paper on the subject, the electromagnetic waves from mobile phones have a significant impact on the behavior of honeybees and could potentially be harming honeybees around the world.”

“To test the relationship between honeybees and buzzing cell phones, he placed phones inside bee hives and then monitored the bees’ reaction. He found that in the presence of actively communicating cellphones (those not in standby mode), bees produced the sounds known as “worker piping,” which tends to indicate disturbance in a bee colony.”

– ABC News

Cell phones, pesticides and viruses aside, commercial bee farming – whether organic (where bee deaths are fewer, but still occur) or conventional – does not provide bees with the opportunity to live out their normal life cycle. No matter how small the animal, farming is farming. Whether you choose to buy backyard honey or a large brand, eating honey and using other bee products encourages using bees for profit.

If you truly want to save bees as a whole and not only honey bees because is much more convenient.. then support bee sanctuaries, boycott the agribusiness and its use of chemicals everywhere. Here I leave some ideas and ways to help bees.

  • Sanctuaries
  1. Spikenard Farm  Honeybee Sanctuary | • Virginia, USA •
  2. New York Bee Sanctuary | • New York, USA •
  3. Native Bee Sanctuary | • Australia •
  4. Artemis Smiles - Honey Bee Sanctuary | • Hawaii, USA •
  5. Urban Evergreen Bee Sanctuary | • Washington, USA •
  6. The Honeybee Helpers | • North West, Ireland •
  7. Bee Sanctuary - The Bee School | • North Carolina, USA •
  8. Bellingen Bee Sanctuary | • Australia •
  9. Morgan Freeman Converted His 124 Acre Ranch Into A Bee Sanctuary To Help Save The Bees
  • Plant your garden with bee-friendly plants

In areas of the country where there are few agricultural crops, honeybees rely upon garden flowers to ensure they have a diverse diet and to provide nectar and pollen. Encourage honeybees to visit your garden by planting single flowering plants and vegetables. Go for all the allium family, all the mints, all beans except French beans and flowering herbs. Bees like daisy-shaped flowers - asters and sunflowers, also tall plants like hollyhocks, larkspur and foxgloves. Bees need a lot of pollen and trees are a good source of food. Willows and lime trees are exceptionally good.

  • Encourage local authorities to use bee-friendly plants in public spaces

Some of the country’s best gardens and open spaces are managed by local authorities. Recently these authorities have recognised the value of planning gardens, roundabouts and other areas with flowers that attract bees. Encourage your authority to improve the area you live in by adventurous planting schemes. These can often be maintained by local residents if the authority feels they do not have sufficient resources.

  • Weeds can be a good thing

Contrary to popular belief, a lawn full of clover and dandelions is not just a good thing—it’s a great thing! A haven for honeybees (and other native pollinators too). Don’t be so nervous about letting your lawn live a little. Wildflowers, many of which we might classify as weeds, are some of the most important food sources for native North American bees. If some of these are “weeds” you chose to get rid of (say you want to pull out that blackberry bush that’s taking over), let it bloom first for the bees and then before it goes to seed, pull it out or trim it back!

  • Don’t use chemicals or pesticides to treat your lawn or garden

Yes, they make your lawn look pristine and pretty, but they’re actually doing the opposite to the life in your biosphere. The chemicals and pest treatments you put on your lawn and garden can cause damage to the honeybees systems. These treatments are especially damaging if applied while the flowers are in bloom as they will get into the pollen and nectar and be taken back to the bee hive where they also get into the honey—which in turn means they can get into us. Pesticides, specifically neo-nicotinoid varieties have been one of the major culprits in Colony Collapse Disorder.

  • Bees are thirsty. Put a small basin of fresh water outside your home

You may not have known this one—but it’s easy and it’s true! If you have a lot of bees starting to come to your new garden of native plants, wildflowers, and flowering herbs, put a little water basin out (a bird bath with some stones in it for them to crawl on does a nice trick). They will appreciate it!

  • Let dandelions and clover grow in your yard.

Dandelions and clover are two of the bees’ favorite foods – they provide tons of nourishment and pollen for our pollinators to make honey and to feed their young (look at this bee frolicking in a dandelion below – like a pig in shit!) And these flowers could not be any easier to grow – all you have to do is not do anything.

I highly recommend also taking a look at this article too as honey is tested on animals, yes, as it says and the article explains honey is tested on dogs, cats, goats, rabbits, mice, rats…

As you can see, there is much more than saying “let’s help the bees by eating honey, vegans are dumb, they need to eat honey because what they eat relies on it”... We can save the bees without taking away the honey they produce, that’s a fact.

Honey is meant as a health food; a healthy food for bees. The more we interfere with their natural processes, both by relying on farmed bees as pollinators (rather than other native wild bees, insects or animals) and to feed our desires for “sweets,” the close we’re coming to agricultural disaster.

Sources

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Ball python natural habitat experience, straight from a trapper/exporter in Ghana

I have a friend who has been living in Ghana for a few months and befriended some snake people involved in catching wild ball pythons, among other native snake species! Exciting stuff, he got deets on where ball pythons are found, straight from the trapper/exporter (named Gyasi) himself… I told him to ask for more exact percentages on where they’re mostly found in Africa:

55% in “the bush” near ponds
25% under rocks
10% under trees when they are well fed/full
10% around trash areas (like literally in piles of trash apparently LOL)

No mention of termite mounds or “hiding in holes their whole life”, at least from this trapper. Go figure?

My friend also hasn’t seen very many grassland areas or open areas in Ghana at least where he is, even the drier areas have a lot of low-growing trees. 

He went with his trapper group on a short expedition lately too, and that sounded exciting, getting to see the native range and habitat of these animals.

So in conclusion: ball pythons have a very wide natural habitat range! They are not solely ambush predators like gaboons, and definitely not living in holes and hiding their whole life. Funny thing, the trapper mentioned nothing of holes or termite mounds himself haha. I think my friend brought up the “holes and termite mounds” thing, and Gyasi was just like “?????” If the holes thing is from other trappers, it must be only one very small part of how ball pythons live!

Anyway, I think these are exciting and interesting details, because obviously the average keeper/breeder’s knowledge that is constantly preached in the states on their natural habitat and living conditions is quite skewed. And it’s always nice to be more informed about the animals we are keeping and the way they are kept. The more knowledge, the better!

Gorehounds

I have not made a list of movies I’ve seen/enjoyed in a while, so here are some good bloody films you animals (like you @havanapitbull). I’ve been on a J-Horror kick:

JIGOKU / HELL / THE SINNERS OF HELL

A cast of terrible people meet on the border of hell itself and talk about how their horrible lives are all related in horrible ways. The psychedelic cinematography, goofy gore and actual lake of blood make this worth seeing.

NOBI / FIRES ON THE PLAIN

A Japanese soldier tries to survive the war at the cost of his own humanity. Fun!

FUDOH: THE NEXT GENERATION

First of a trilogy of Young Yakuza films by Takashi Miike, you have the extreme gore and weird sex hangups in his later films but this one was filmed in the 90′s, so nostalgia I guess. There’s a tattoo made of human blood on our main character and also a vaginal blow-dart! Miike!

GUINEA PIG: MERMAID IN A MANHOLE

Unlike the previous few Guinea Pig movies that are just hyper-realistic gore effects for an hour, you instead have a weird pseudo-romance directed and written by horror mangaka Hideshi Hino. And it shows! You have a pervert artist falling in love with a mermaid he finds exploring the sewer. As she slowly rots to death outside of her native habitat of filth, he paints her portrait using her rotting body as paint.

AI NO BOREI / EMPIRE OF PASSION

A torrid love affair ends in a murder and a dead husband thrown down a well. The rest of the movie has the wife and her lover enjoying their new life of passion and slowly worrying more and more about neighborhood gossip and a ghost showing up. This one is a slow burn, probably one of the best movies I’ve seen all month.

DEATH POWDER

People losing control of their bodies in a fetishistic cyberpunk hell. Thats really it mostly, lots of pretty pictures of flesh.

GEMINI

Shin’ya Tsukamoto is easily one of the five best directors in the world in my book, and Gemini is one of the reasons why. You have the standard tale of twin brothers torn apart at birth and one coming home for revenge against the other, but Tsukamoto delivers such a raw alien sensuality to every scene that makes you feel like a creepy voyeur into these wounded and insane lives. Its damn great.

LUCKY SKY DIAMOND

A girl wakes up in a hospital that probably isn’t a hospital. I’m not saying anymore beyond this point, its better to go in as blind as possible here. The true epitome of the inherent creepiness of VHS-quality video.

FUAN NO TANE / PET PEEVE

Masaaki Nakayama is one of the best horror mangakas who has ever lived, his work is always revolving around the subject of how horror is best shown when its barely shown at all; Little glimpses of something behind you, a monster in a story you barely remember, that guy on the road acting odd, its all here and it will make you feel uncomfortable. How can you capture such subtle horror? They come damn close in the adaptation of his short stories here. The special effects range from incredibly real to awful, all done on purpose to unnerve in a way I havent been unnerved in a long time.

goals: make a wetland environment for skunk cabbages to grow them in cultivation both bc they are nice babies and also because research

we usually can’t grow skunk cabbages because they’re very deep rooted plants with contractile roots, meaning that every year the roots drag the whole plant farther into the mud; it essentially grows downward. Iowas lost a lot of our native skunk cabbages because of the redirection of their natural streams (they love cool water streams and bogs where they can be bathed in cold, wet mud at all times of the year) for agriculture. there are only a few native skunk cabbage habitats left in iowa, and those are protected. 

setup: an artificial bog. kind of smaller, like a garden with nothing under it but dirt (no piping or anything), but for the skunk babs. water pump is installed to make a little cold stream. smelly babies are put on sides of stream to grow downwards to their heart’s content. this is the dream man

dorano121  asked:

Can coriander grow in an area with small forests dotted around everywhere, grassy plains that are great for agriculture, and plentiful rainfall? My fantasy country is near-ish to the equator (around Egypt-ish, latitude-wise). Thanks!

Coriander grows in meadows and fields and has been cultivated in Egypt for centuries if not millennia and Egypt is part of its native range (which extends from southern Europe to northern Africa to southwestern Asia). It sounds like you will be clear to have a coriander type plant in your setting.

~*Mod Den*~

Disclaimer

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Bringing Back Tex Creek

A few miles east of Idaho Falls lies a dramatic landscape of gently rolling benches and exposed steep ravines. Past volcanic activity created an area so rich in food and shelter that it has its own designation -The Tex Creek Wildlife Management Area (WMA).  Tex Creek provides essential connectivity for wildlife moving from harsh high elevation forests to lower elevation sage and grasslands. In fact, Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) estimates Tex Creek provides vital winter range for upwards of 7,000 elk and mule deer on any given year. Unfortunately, Tex Creek’s habitat status changed rapidly in August of 2016. 

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Animals You Didn't Know Existed

1. The Dhole

The Dhole is a species of canid native to South and Southeast Asia. The dhole is a highly social animal, living in large clans which occasionally split up into small packs to hunt. It primarily preys on medium-sized ungulates, which it hunts by tiring them out in long chases, and kills by disemboweling them. Though fearful of humans, dhole packs are bold enough to attack large and dangerous animals such as wild boar, water buffalo, and even tigers.

2. The Babirusa 

Babirusa, meaning “Hog-deer”, are members of the pig family found in Wallacea, or specifically the Indonesian islands of Sulawesi, Togian, Sula and Buru. If a babirusa does not grind its tusks (achievable through regular activity), they will eventually keep growing so as to penetrate the animal’s own skull.

3. Pink Fairy Armadillo

The pink fairy armadillo is approximately 3.5-4.5 inches long, excluding the tail, and is pale rose or pink in color. It has the ability to bury itself completely in a matter of seconds if frightened. It is a nocturnal animal and it burrows small holes near ant colonies in dry soil, and feeds mainly on ants and ant larvae near its burrow. It uses large front claws to agitate the sand, allowing it to almost swim through the ground like it is water. It is torpedo-shaped, and has a shielded head and back.

4. The Fossa

The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island of Madagascar and has been compared to a small cougar. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree.

5. The Gerenuk

The gerenuk, also known as the Waller’s gazelle, is a long-necked species of antelope found in dry thorn bush scrub and desert in Eastern Africa. The word gerenuk comes from the Somali language, meaning “giraffe-necked”. Gerenuks have a relatively small head for their body, but their eyes and ears are proportionately large. Gerenuks seldom graze but browse on prickly bushes and trees, such as acacias. They can reach higher branches and twigs than other gazelles and antelope by standing erect on their rear legs and stretching their elongated necks.

6.Naked Mole Rat

This creature has a lot of characteristics that make it very important to human beings. For one it is resistant to cancer. They also live up to 28 years, which is unheard of in mammals of its size. It seemingly does not age much in those 28 years either. It remains “young, healthy and fully fertile for almost all its days, which for an elderly animal is equivalent to an 80-year-old woman having the biological make-up of someone 50 years younger.” The naked mole rat is used in both cancer research and the study of aging. Not only making it a bizarre creature, but an incredibly important creature as well.

7. Irrawaddy Dolphin 

The Irrawaddy dolphin is a species of oceanic dolphin found near sea coasts and in estuaries and rivers in parts of the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. Genetically, the Irrawaddy dolphin is closely related to the killer whale.

8. Markhor

The markhor is a large species of wild goat that is found in northeastern Afghanistan and Pakistan. The species is classed by the IUCN as Endangered, as there are fewer than 2,500 mature individuals. The markhor is the national animal of Pakistan. While chewing the cud, a foam-like substance comes out of its mouth which drops on the ground and dries. This foam-like substance is sought after by the local people, who believe it is useful in extracting snake poison from snake bitten wounds.

9. Yeti Crab

Also known as the Kiwaidae, this crab is a type of marine decapod living at deep-sea hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. The animals are commonly referred to as “yeti crabs” because of their claws and legs, which are white and appear to be furry like the mythical yeti

10. Snub-Nosed Monkey

Snub-nosed monkeys live in various parts of Asia and get their name from the short stump of a nose on their round face. Snub-nosed monkeys inhabit mountain forests, in the winter moving into deeply secluded regions. They spend the majority of their life in the trees and live together in very large groups of up to 600 members. They have a large vocal repertoire, calling sometimes solo while at other times together in choir-like fashion.

11. The Maned Wolf

The Maned Wolf is the largest canid in South America, resembling a large fox with reddish fur. This mammal is found in open and semi-open habitats, especially grasslands with scattered bushes and trees throughout South America. The maned wolf is the tallest of the wild canids and it’s long legs are most likely an adaptation to the tall grasslands of its native habitat.

12. Southern Right Whale Dolphin

The southern right whale dolphin is a small and slender species of mammal found in cool waters of the southern hemisphere. They are fast active swimmers and have no visible teeth and no dorsal fin. They are very graceful and often move by leaping out of the water continuously

13. Southern Red Muntjac

Found in south Asia, it has soft, short, brownish or greyish hair and is omnivorous, feeding on grass, fruits, shoots, seeds, birds’ eggs as well as small animals. It sometimes even displays scavenging behavior, feeding on carrion. It gives calls similar to barking, usually upon sensing a predator. Males are extremely territorial and—despite their diminutive size—can be quite fierce. They will fight each other for territory using their antlers or their tusk-like upper canine teeth, and can even defend themselves against certain predators such as dogs.

14. Cyphonia Clavata 

It is a species of treehopper called Cyphonia Clavata that literally has an ant growing out of its head. Well not literally, the ant-like thing on its head is an appendage that hides the treehopper’s actual body from predators.

15. Sunda Colugo

Also known as The Sunda flying lemur, it is not actually a lemur and does not fly. Instead, it glides as it leaps among trees. It is strictly arboreal, is active at night, and feeds on soft plant parts such as young leaves, shoots, flowers, and fruits. The Sunda Coluga can be found throughout Southeast Asia in Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore

16. Tufted Deer

The Tufted Deer is a small species of deer characterized by the prominent tuft of black hair on its forehead. It is a close relative of the muntjac, living somewhat further north over a wide area of central China. It is a timid animal, mainly solitary or found in pairs and prefers places with good cover, where it is well camouflaged.

17. Lamprey

Lampreys are a type of jawless fish that live mostly in coastal and fresh waters whose adults are characterized by a toothed, funnel-like sucking mouth. They attach themselves to fish and suck their blood. Lampreys have been around for nearly 300 millions years and their body structure has remained relatively unchanged.

18. Raccoon Dog

The Raccoon Dog, or Tanuki, is a canid indigenous to East Asia. The raccoon dog is named for its resemblance to the raccoon, to which it is not closely related. They are very good climbers and regularly climb trees.

19. The Patagonian Mara

The Patagonian Mara is a relatively large rodent found in parts of Argentina. This herbivorous, somewhat rabbit-like animal has distinctive long ears and long limbs and its hind limbs are longer and more muscular than its forelimbs.

20. The Amazonian Royal Flycatcher

The Amazonian Royal Flycatcher is found in forests and woodlands throughout most of the Amazon basin. They are about 6 ½ inches in length and like to dart out from branches to catch flying insects or pluck them from leaves. They build very large nests (sometimes up to 6 feet long) on a branches near water. The nest hangs over the water which makes it hard for predators to reach.

21. Zebra Duiker

The zebra duiker is a small antelope found in Ivory Coast and other parts of Africa. They have gold or red-brown coats with distinctive zebra-like stripes (hence the name) Their prong-like horns are about 4.5 cm long in males, and half that in females. They live in lowland rainforests and mostly eat leaves and fruit.

22. Star-Nosed Mole

The star-nosed mole is a small mole found in wet low areas of eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. It is easily identified by the 11 pairs of pink fleshy appendages ringing its snout, which is used as a touch organ with more than 25,000 minute sensory receptors, known as Eimer’s organs, with which this hamster-sized mole feels its way around.

Link!

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I’ll talk more about this project for a while as it unfolds, but basically at my job at the Field Museum, we have an herbarium with approximately 3 million plant specimens collected from around the world, over a long period of time.

This is leafy prairie clover (Dalea foliosa), a federally endangered plant that lives in four different states, usually in gravelly dolomite prairies. This particular specimen was found on Langham Island (home of the Kankakee mallow) and hasn’t been seen there in over a century. It was probably collected to death by this botanist, in fact. We have three of the five plants he found there in 1872-73.

Myself and some of the other Friends of Langham Island noticed our collection here still has seeds attached, so utilizing THE POWER OF SCIENCE we are going to try and germinate some of these seeds for eventual reintroduction to Langham. Essentially we are de-extincting a genetic line that was prematurely snuffed out due to over-enthusiastic botanizing. We plan on getting the proper permits and using all available information to make this reintroduction a success, including the reestablishment of its known associate species, most of which are also extirpated. If modern human disturbance and destruction result in extinction of a line or whole species, don’t we have a responsibility to try and reverse some of that if we can?

I love the idea that we have so many plants we know have come from populations that are no longer there and we can use this information (or even the seeds of the original plants) to help direct our restoration efforts. Even if these 130 year old seeds don’t germinate, we are still going to do all we can to bring back D. foliosa to Langham. So it can be the most healthy and biodiverse version of itself we can picture.

It’s so much fun to imagine what is possible by looking at what once was commonplace and is now gone. We CAN get hope from loss!

anonymous asked:

I've been growing outdoor carnivorous plants for a while but I just got a terrarium (the modified fish tank kind, not the jar kind), and I don't know what to put in it, are there any good terrarium CPs you'd recommend? I can rig it up with whatever kind of lighting needed but it doesn't have a cooling system and I can't get one so it is unfortunately not suitable for heliamphora, but it will probably still not get above 85 degrees F or so.

l o w l a n d .  n e p e n t h e s 

get those dank tropical babs with some nice bright light and you got urself a cool nice jungle like they have back in their native habitat!! i would look around a bit to find a species you like. you can find a really good interactive guide to the environments different nepenthes species need here, but going off of that, i chose a few that were primarily lowland but could go down into intermediate if needed. lets go to the runway

N. papuana: (x)

robust. frilled. dependable. feminist that will go on adventures with u. 10/10

N. rafflesiana: (x)

humble. gentle but pointy going up from the peristome to the leaf, so shes always ready for a fight. will be your best friend and watch movies with u 10/10. 

N. albomarginata: (x)

smaller and sleek, will fight you over a chicken nugget. white ring under peristome feeds termites in natural environment, just like any ideal woman. 10/10

N. gracilis (x)

shes a bitch CEO who built this goddamn company from the ground and wont take shit from anybody. inside tho shes very soft and a closeted lesbian, its okay honey just come out and be yourself!!!!! 10/10 

N. merrilliana: (x)

okay shes really shy and self conscious about her body??? all these guys hit on her bc she thicc but she always turns them down bc they come on for all the wrong reasons like why would u come up and be like ‘wow thats a really big nepenthes’ when she also has feelings and maybe doesnt like being a big nepenthes and just wants people to see her for the person she is inside like thats so rude?? shes super anxious but is like the most caring person ever and would totally be willing to support u but needs someone whos willing to help her out of her comfort zone and embrace the big nepenthes that she is. 10/10

I get it. Zoos have a history and an outdated image that we have to get away from. Institutions like the AZA are making sure that zoos are held to a standard of preservation, not exploitation. Zoos have become islands of preservation for species whose native habitats are no longer supporting them. We would love to see the gorillas live peacefully in the wild of their native habitat untouched by human war, greed, disease and pollution. But this is not the reality we live in. The aforementioned factors have decimated the populations and are the reason they are endangered. And it’s not just gorillas, we are in the 6th great extinction wave, the previous ones were caused by large natural disasters (meteors) or by major changes to the environment (production of oxygen when photosynthesis began to take off). The 6th is caused by humans. Plain and simple. Extinction rates are 1000 times baseline and it is no coincidence. So get the conversation and Conservation started!

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People often ask me how big norm is.. getting him to stay still long enough to measure him is another matter entirely lol 😂 but it gives you an idea
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