native feminism

A reminder of the difference between equally non-violent protests when the protestors are majority black and majority white in terms of the police.

And if you need a reminder of what happens when it’s non-violent Native Americans well…

Why I need Chicana feminism

Because I was taught to stay away from certain styles because they were too “mexican”. With phrases like “the bigger the hoop, the bigger the hole” when I loved wearing big earrings. Being told that red hair against my brown skin looked “ghetto” instead of fierce and bold. Wearing stylish flannels like the pretty pastel haired girls on tumblr and being told I look like a “chola”. Working hard to get rid of my slang because society taught me that it was “unflattering”. That bright red lips were too much. That my natural intense brows are now a makeup “fad”. When in reality all this shit was made up by people that want to put us down for claiming our own identity. 

Bertha Parker Pallan (1907-1978) was a Native American archaeologist, of Abenaki and Seneca descent. Her parents were Behula Tahamont, a Native American actress, and Arthur C. Parker, the first president for the Society of American Archaeology. 

Parker discovered and participated in many archaeological sites during her career, but she is best known for her work at the site of Gypsum Cave. Although she was originally hired her as the expedition cook and secretary, she was allowed to explore the cave and was able to reach more inaccessible areas. It is here that she uncovered the first giant ground sloth remains in association with humans, a discovery that received national attention among anthropologists. After her time at Gypsum Cave, she discovered two additional sites: Corn Creek Campsite, and a pueblo site at Scorpion Hill. She worked for over 10 years as an Assistant in Archaeology and Ethnology at the Southwest Museum, where she published a number of archaeological and ethnological papers in the museum journal. In her later years, she acted as a technical advisory and consultant on TV shows and movies depicting American Indians, and hosted her own TV show on Native American history and folklore.

Bertha Parker Pallan was a ground-breaker in many aspects. She is considered the first female Native American archaeologist, and she is one of the first women  recognized for conducting her work at a high level of skill in the field without a university education. Additionally, her role as a consultant for TV and movies influenced how American Indian cultures and their histories were depicted in the media.

These are the 37 banks that are funding and supporting DAPL.

Women’s March is calling for people to cancel their accounts and credit lines with these creditors in opposition to their support of harming, oppressing, and stealing from Native Americans.

DAPL BANKS:

Wells Fargo

Citibank (CitiGroup)

JPMorgan Chase

PNC Bank

Goldman Sachs

Morgan Stanley

HSBC Bank

Bank of America

Deutsche Bank

BNP Paribas

SunTrust

The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ

Mizuho Bank

TD Securities

Credit Agricole

Intesa SanPaolo

ING Bank

Natixis

BayernLB

BBVA Securities

DNB Capital

ICBC London

SMBC Nikko Securities

Societe Generale

Royal Bank of Scotland
ABN Amro Capital

Bank of Nova Scotia (Scotiabank)

Citizens Bank

Comerica Bank

U.S. Bank

Barclays

Compass Bank

Credit Suisse

DNB Capital/ASA

Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

Royal Bank of Canada

UBS

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Something to keep in mind. The Women’s March in Washington DC from an Indigenous Woman’s perspective.


This is especially humbling because my sister, who is also very white passing, also attending a Women’s March with signs that addressed MMIW and NoDAPL and didn’t face any of the same racialized tension as these women. Meanwhile, “feminist spaces” and Womens Marches are less than welcoming places for Native women who aren’t white passing. 

It really hurt to read all of these tweets but it’s important to share it all the same. The feminist movement has a LOT that could be improved upon.


Source: https://twitter.com/sydnerain/status/823378710833270786

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This entire thread by @sydnerain on twitter is SO IMPORTANT but here are some particularly important points to consider. The women’s march provided so many opportunities for women to listen to each other, to listen to women of colour and to see why intersectionality is important. This isn’t the beginning of the protest for some of us.

@takingbackourculture
@indigenouswomenrising

I’m here for women of color wearing their natural hair

I’m here for women of color wearing vibrant clothing

I’m here for women of color embracing their bodies 

I’m here for women of color feeling confident and beautiful

I’m here for women of color 

The Aila Test

Originally posted by uber52


I’ve decided to create a test inspired by the Bechdel Test that is exclusive for only Indigenous / Aboriginal female characters and the name is inspired by the character Aila from Rhymes For Young Ghouls.


If there is an Indigenous/Aboriginal woman in a film/comic/book/video game/etc, she passes the Aila Test if she meets these requirements:

1. She is a main character.
2. Who doesn’t fall in love with a white man.
3. And doesn’t end up raped or murdered (especially to push said white man’s storyline)


Please reblog and share with characters who pass the test. 

@feminismandmedia @angrynativefeminists @nativepeopleproblems

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Wilma Pearl Mankiller was the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation. A liberal member of the Democratic Party, she served as principal chief for ten years from 1985 to 1995. She is the author of a national-bestselling autobiography, Mankiller: A Chief and Her People and co-authored Every Day Is a Good Day: Reflections by Contemporary Indigenous Women.

Mankiller’s administration founded the Cherokee Nation Community Development Department and saw a population increase of Cherokee Nation citizens from 55,000 to 156,000

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Courtesy of Ruth Cankudutawin Hopkins, The Truth Behind Pocahontas.

Image description: a picture of Disney’s version of Pocahontas with the following words:
“Pocahontas was a nickname (meaning The Naughty One). Her real name was Matoaka. If we believe John Smith’s account of events, she would have been 10 or 11 when she met him. That’s hardly a romantic scenario, unless you’re a pedophile.

Pocahontas was kidnapped by the English. She was imprisoned at the Jamestown colony for over a year, where she was assaulted. While still a teenager, our young heroine married John Rolfe. Marrying the Englishman was a condition of her release.

Pocahontas was then taken to England, as a sort of living specimen and advertisement for colonization. She died at the tender age of 21, unaware that the English would create the Pocahontas Myth; one where she was the good Indian who rescued the whiteman from her brutish, savage Tribesmen.

This myth birthed many colonial stereotypes of Native people and was used as justification to make war against us.”

Black, brown, Asian, and First Nations people, for a multitude of reasons, have made their way across the entire globe. In seeking the future or fleeing the past, we have had to emigrate, assimilate, change our names, learn new tongues, abandon customs, forget our histories, leave behind our religions.

Forgive your brothers and sisters who may not speak the language. Be patient with your brothers and sisters who speak with Western accents and stumble through traditional greetings. Love your brothers and sisters who don’t know their cultures and have forgotten their ancestors. It has never been their fault.