nationality:german

anonymous asked:

SO MY FRIEND WAS WALKING OUT OF GERMAN CLASS AND HE DROPPED SOMETHING AND SAID "MOTHER FUCKER" AND THE TEACHER SAID "excuse me, language" SO HE GOES "oh right its german class, MATHEN FACKEN" AND I KNOW THATS NOT HOW U SAY MOTHERFUCKER IN GERMAN BUT THE TEACHER JUST GAVE UP AND STARTED LAUGHING

motherfucker is literally mutterficker in german but it can only used as an insult whereas in english it can be an insult or just an exclamation of anger so if u want sth to use in the same context just go with scheiße

Discovering the Structure of DNA

On February 21, 1953, Francis Crick and James Watson discovered the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using unacknowledged photographs and research by their colleague Rosalind Franklin. They had considered many other candidates for the structure, including single and triple strand helices before deciphering the structure. Franklin’s x-ray crystallography (image below)

 would provide the missing essential clue they needed to decipher the structure.  They would publish a paper that same year describing their discovery, but the significance of the discovery was largely overlooked by the general public for over a year. Today it stands as one of the most remarkable milestones in the history of science.

The word deoxyribonucleic is a compound word formed around the main root word ribose, which arrived in English in 1892 via the German word Ribose which was itself borrowed from the English word of 1880 arabinose, a sugar derived from gum arabic. The word nucleic comes from the Latin word nucleus meaning a kernel around 1700, from the Latin diminutive nucula meaning a little nut. It did not take the meaning of a central characteristic or attribute until 1762. It wasn’t applied to cellular structures for another 70 years around 1862. The -oxy- root comes from the Ancient Greek word οξυς (oxys) meaning sharp or pointed (sharing the earlier common root word that gave the Latin word acer with the same meaning and ultimately the English word acid). The de- prefix is a Latin preposition meaning down from, off or away from, used mainly in English compound words as a privative, meaning that something lacks something.

Morris From America (2016)

I’m a sucker for the coming of age genre. So a movie about an America black kid and his dad in Germany? I’m all for it.

I thought it was incredibly well-acted, well-paced and yet, does the coming-of-age genre shtick well to boot. Craig Robinson was the star of this thing from start to finish, but Markees Christmas was the reason this film shined as the titular Morris.

I obviously came into this one a mark because of the unique storyline, but just how well executed it was made it a favorite.

In language learning, the boundaries between levels are blurred.

This is not common knowledge, although it should be. Always remember that language is complex - especially if you are struggling.

For example, I was lucky enough to study abroad in Germany. I forgot I could use a dictionary on one exam - which, by the way, determines the grade for your entire semester - and I made off with the lowest passing grade (but I did pass!). Yet I could explain needing a refund for bus tickets, ordering food, symptoms to a doctor, and explaining why I needed a new USB cable for my camera. I could watch movies without subtitles and actually understand the words.

Even now, I as work through Aspekte C1, it’s obvious how uneven learning a language can be. I can get through two pages and have a 90-95% comprehension with the first reading, but I may get stuck on the third page with about 50% comprehension. 

Language learning takes time. You have to continuously dive deeper and deeper into a language. Sometimes it takes longer than you thought it would. Sometimes you learn more about your native language than your target one.

But it’s worth it.

Favorite German Words

Der Klartext = literally “clear text”. The very, very German concept of (what others may cosider brutal) honesty and straight-forwardness being a virtue. Uncoded text, text in clear, uncensored speech, the opposite of the (very Anglo) concepts of vagueness and beating around the bush in order to be “polite”. Mit jemandem Klartext reden is when it gets serious and to the point, when things are spelled out clearly so actual solutions can be found. Culturewise, you will notice that Germans on average are solution-based. A Klartext conversation may be required in conflict, when someone has been avoidant or when things are getting urgent and a problem must be faced head-on. It may lead to a breakup, a compromise, an ending, a solution or a new beginning. If you find yourself thinking Germans are “rude”, consider that “Klartext reden” and NOT being vague and avoidant is generally considered a good thing in Germany as, sometimes, it is necessary to get things out of the way to move ahead.