national right to life

Azula

It constantly upsets me whenever I see people say that Azula doesn’t deserve any sympathy, that she was a monster, she deserved what was coming for her, she abused people (to a certain extent she did to Mai and Ty Lee)*, a playing victim, doesn’t deserve any redemption arc etc…

And so, i’ve decided to write this so people can understand her character better.

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In the comics, it became clear that Azula’s accusation of their mother (Ursa) liking loving Zuko more than her, was indeed true. Never once did we see Ursa actually alone with Azula unless she was reprimanding her. Ursa was always just with Zuko. It was only once did we see Ursa actually with Azula (albeit Zuko was there too), and even then Ursa was neglecting Azula and just paying her full attention to Zuko. You can say Ursa loved Azula, sure, but the fact is that Azula never felt she was loved by her mother. Why would she? Ursa never praised her when she actually did something praiseworthy, or even when she behaved better than Zuko.

A child, especially a child as perceptive as Azula was, could’ve only reached the conclusion that she was never loved if there wasn’t any evidence to prove her wrong. Compare Ursa’s goodbye between her children. She kisses them both, but she only wakes up Zuko to tell him she loves him. For Azula, she has no knowledge of Ursa even coming to her room.

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Now for Ozai. According to Zuko, Ozai favored Azula over him because she was a prodigy, which was true, but notice how even in flashbacks or in the comics, Ozai was not seen spending time with Azula like how Ursa was with Zuko. Ozai only favored Azula for her talent, and that was it. As a child, Azula only received praise from her father when she did something praiseworthy and her ideals matched his. Was Ozai truly spending time with his daughter? No. Did he truly love her? No.

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In contrast to Ozai’s treatment of Azula, Ursa’s was the complete opposite. Ursa only paid attention to Azula when she did something wrong. To Azula, it was better to be scolded than to be ignored so she did bad things.

People always fail to remember that Azula never had any guidance, unlike Zuko. Ursa was always with Zuko. When she’d reprimand Azula for her actions, she’d never tell her why they were wrong and only send her away. Azula actually questions her mother as to why she couldn’t do what she did, but Ursa only tells her that she should treat the flowers with respect. Ursa NEVER explained to Azula what was wrong with what she was doing.

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Notice the difference in how Ursa treated her children when they misbehaved. Ursa’s first thought for Zuko is to understand her son’s reasoning behind his actions while for Azula, her first thought was to only scold her.

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Again in this scene, Azula was just asking a simple question but yet again, Ursa scolds her for it and doesn’t tell her why it was rude. Azula only understood why it was inappropriate when Zuko interjects and gives her an example. ‘Fine but I still think Dad’s better’ is basically her response to Zuko. Ursa never tried to get Azula to understand why her questions were inappropriate.

Even Iroh was playing favorites with them. It’s obvious that Iroh didn’t even know Azula enough to know that she wasn’t the usual doll loving girl since he gifted her a doll while he gifted Zuko a dagger. Take note that Azula was merely 11 years old when she was left completely alone with Ozai for the next 3 years.

Azula grew up in a militaristic environment surrounded with only her servants and cruel war aged old men. Her friends were rarely there since Ty Lee had run off to the circus and Mai probably didn’t even come to the palace that much either since she was closer to Ty Lee.

Azula was completely left alone with Ozai. She was forced to mature and have the mindset of an adult at 11, to forgo her childhood innocence and anything else that may prove to be a weakness in the future. Ozai made sure of that.

So growing up, Azula basically didn’t have a mother, father, grandfather or an uncle. There was literally no one to guide her to the light unlike Zuko.

As Azula grew older, Ozai’s expectations of her only grew higher. That was how Azula’s obsession with perfection began.

‘Almost isn’t good enough!’

Azula needed to be only perfect. Anything lesser than that was not appreciated by Ozai. Since Zuko was a failure to Ozai, that only meant that he was harsher in perfecting Azula to be the heir he desired. Since Azula was capable of incredible feats as a child, that means his expectations of her was even higher than his was for Zuko. Azula was expected to not only just excel, but to be the finest of all firebenders (second only to him of course).

‘My father gave me far more leeway than he ever gave Zuko, but he is not a patient man.’

‘This scheme is indeed my master stroke, destined to place me in Father’s good graces forever.’

- Azula (Tale of Azula)

From this we can deduce that Azula was not always actually in Ozai’s good graces, unlike what Zuko thought. Azula knows the consequences of disappointing and disobeying her father from watching Zuko, and she knows that even she herself isn’t exempted from her father’s cruelty.

The higher you climb, the harder you fall— this quote perfectly describes Azula demise. Azula was known as a prodigy even as a child so only perfection and brilliance was expected of her. Failure was considered improbable. No one expects her to fail, so if she does, her punishment is twice as worse as it should be.

Take note, Azula actually loved Ozai. He was the only parent who praised her, who understood her worth, who agreed with her ideals even when she was just a child. Ozai approved of Azula. Azula had seen his approval as Love, which was why Azula never betrayed her father and did everything he commanded her to. To Azula, Ozai was the only person who truly loved her and didn’t actually fear her. She wasn’t going to lose that one and only person who loved her.

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Azula was afraid. She was actually afraid of what her father might do to her for speaking out against him. She knows from Zuko’s experience of what Ozai was capable of. Her brother had spoken out of turn in the war meeting, disregarding Ozai’s opinion in the plan of General Bujing, which then resulted in the Agni Kai between father and son. Ozai had struck Zuko with lightning when Zuko showed defiance and disrespect.

Azula knew she wasn’t an exception, and it was her instincts of self-preservation that prevented her from comitting the same mistakes that Zuko did. Zuko was the prime example of what she would be if she wasn’t what her father desired. She became what she was so she could survive.

Azula was every bit a victim as Zuko was, and probably even more.

8

The Native Nations March is currently taking place through D.C. and at the White House, capping off a four-day protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. As indigenous groups from all over the country continue to call for a meeting with Donald Trump, news outlets need make sure the voices of water protectors and environmental activists are heard.

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Malcolm X photographed by Gordon Parks for LIFE magazine promoting the Muhammad Speaks newspaper, 1962.

On the night of April 27, 1962, policemen ransacked the Nation of Islam Mosque in Los Angeles and wounded seven unarmed Muslims, leaving Ronald Stokes dead and William Rogers who is seen in the wheelchair above paralyzed.

Mildred Jefferson was born in 1926 in Texas, the only child of a Methodist preacher and a school teacher. Growing up during the Great Depression, she would often follow the town doctor’s horse and buggy around, and decided she wanted to be a doctor, too. She got a master’s degree from Tufts University and then went on to be the first black woman to be accepted to – and graduate from – Harvard Medical School. She was later the first female doctor at the Boston University Medical Center, the first female member of the Boston Surgical Society, and the first female intern at Boston City Hospital.

As a doctor, she took great pride in the vocation of saving people. “I became a physician to help save lives,” she once said. “I am at once a physician, a citizen and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow this concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged and the planned have the right to live.”

If you’re wondering why you’ve never heard of her, it’s because she was a co-founder of National Right to Life, Black Americans for Life, and Massachusetts Citizens Concerned for Life. Jefferson believed that poor black women were being victimized by a eugenicist agenda via the abortion industry. “Blacks suffer more from abortion because what looks like help is actually striking against them,” Jefferson explained to the Pittsburgh Press in 1977. “Blacks are fewer. They will disappear sooner… People like me have the lowest birth rate.”

She was suspicious of the pro-choice movement’s claim that they were trying to help. “Abortionists argue, ‘Let the poor have abortions like the rich can.’ Then abortionists should make a list of the other things rich women have that they’re going to give to poor women.”

Jefferson also criticized Roe vs. Wade for corrupting the field of medicine.  “I became a doctor in the tradition that is represented in the Bible of looking upon medicine as a high calling. I will not stand aside and let this great profession of mine, of the doctor, give up the designation of healer to become that of the social executioner. The Supreme Court Justices only had to hand down an order. Social workers only have to make arrangements, but it has been given to my profession to destroy the life of the innocent and the helpless.” Another time she proclaimed, “I am not willing to become the new social executioner… We [doctors] will be the first slaves of the state and you will soon join us.”

She traveled the country with this message. She sometimes crossed party lines and is credited with confronting President Ronald Reagan on his pro-abortion stance. “The fight for the right to life,” she explained, “is not the cause of a special few, but the cause of every man, woman and child who cares not only about his or her own family, but the whole family of man.”

She died in 2010. The Radiance Foundation set up the Dr. Mildred Jefferson Trailblazer Award, a $1,000 scholarship, in her honor.

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We are all Noémie amirite? 😯😍🙈 If you’re already deep into the POALOF fandom, you already know what the reference is!

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Lahat tayo si bebe Noé, diba diba? 😆

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私たちはみんな、アデルに初めて会うとノエミと同じような反応をするでしょうね。😆😆😆

anyways just a thought but uh lex’s madness was not wrought of his last name at all… it was a result of his intense pride and god complex, which were manifestations of his upbringing as a child genius with a mother who adored him and implicitly encouraged his xenophobia and egocentrism.

lena is such a different story. lillian hated her! she said herself that she was made to feel like an outsider growing up. she doesn’t see herself as a god amongst men, sent to rid the earth of any sort of presumed evil or whatever because her pride and confidence and ego were never allowed to develop, much less to the extent of her brother and mother.

in short: lex was raised to feel like a god. lena was specifically and intentionally raised to feel like an indiscretion, like a mistake. sure, lena was also raised in the midst of luthor wealth and privilege, and she’s a certified genius, but i think we’ve seen her be a pretty damn good steward of her fortune and intelligence. hmm, maybe that’s because lillian never let her forget that she was adopted, so she grew up looking for ways to give back, rather than to take? perhaps??? just speculating.

this “deep down, she’s still a luthor” rhetoric is baffling to me. as far as lena is concerned, the only time the letters attached to her first name hold any sort of value is in scrabble. she and lex shared a house, they share a last name, but they did not share an upbringing, and isn’t that what really matters?

furthermore, both the most important person in her life right now and national city’s symbol of perfect morality (who happen to be one and the same) are consistently validating presences in her life, reminding her that she is good and she is not like her family, and supporting her through her moral grey. (and, side note, she’s able to do so through her ridiculously parallel personal experiences, which, wow, the fact that the idea of them together is not something that’s being taken particularly seriously is shocking.)

tl;dr: lex grew up seeking power. lena grew up seeking love. lena is good. this writing is lazy. can’t wait for more lena validation and supercorp scenes.

It is our duty now to begin to lay the plans and determine the strategy for the winning of a lasting peace and the establishment of an American standard of living higher than ever before known. We cannot be content, no matter how high that general standard of living may be, if some fraction of our people—whether it be one-third or one-fifth or one-tenth—is ill-fed, ill-clothed, ill-housed, and insecure.

This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength, under the protection of certain inalienable political rights—among them the right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. They were our rights to life and liberty.

As our nation has grown in size and stature, however—as our industrial economy expanded—these political rights proved inadequate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness.

We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. “Necessitous men are not free men.” People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.

In our day these economic truths have become accepted as self-evident. We have accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all—regardless of station, race, or creed.

Among these are:

  • The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the nation;
  • The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;
  • The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living;
  • The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at home or abroad;
  • The right of every family to a decent home;
  • The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health;
  • The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment;
  • The right to a good education.
  • All of these rights spell security. And after this war is won we must be prepared to move forward, in the implementation of these rights, to new goals of human happiness and well-being.

America’s own rightful place in the world depends in large part upon how fully these and similar rights have been carried into practice for all our citizens. For unless there is security here at home there cannot be lasting peace in the world.

Vet School Difficulties and Accomplishments by the Year

1st year:

-Difficulties: 

How the eff do you study all these arteries and nerves and muscles??? How do I study for this? Should I join all 15 clubs or nah? Why am I studying harder than undergrad/college but getting worse grades???How can I remember all these people/classmates??  Why do I feel like I won’t be able to pass or be good enough? Depression. Not sure how to juggle exams, friends, family, studying, and mental health. Feeling like there is information overload X 4. Like you are constantly drowning. How do you not drown?  4 tests IN ONE WEEK? WHAT THE EFF.

-Accomplishments

I survived 4 exams in one week! I recognized an organ during histology today! I didn’t die during my anatomy practical! I remembered a classmate’s name today! I touched a live dog today! 

2nd year:

-Difficulties: How in the absolute WORLD is there MORE information this year?? Tell me how this is possible!?!? So many parasites, bacteria, viruses, and pathology to know. Vet school isn’t novel any more, and you are YEARSSSS away from clinics. 

-Accomplishments: Can now juggle watching Netflix, talking to your friends, and studying all at the same time. Know almost everyone in class- where they sit, and one or two quirky facts about them. Figured out that grades really aren’t everything.  

3rd year:

-Difficulties: Have never been more apathetic. 

-Accomplishments: Have never been more apathetic. 

4th year (clincs): 

-Difficulties: So you’ve been studying for 3 years and you know NOTHING. NOTHING! Where the eff is everything? How do I fill in this paperwork? How do I say this to a client? What is the dose for this medication? Why am I peed on every two seconds?? Why do I not know this? I don’t know how to answer this question by the owner what do I do?? So am I going to get comfortable on the last day of each rotation and then switch and feel like an idiot EVERY SINGLE TIME? Why does this feel so inefficient? OMG my attending vet just asked me a question… PANIC!!! Why does every rotation have so many different ways to do things? Why do I feel like I’m not good enough or I don’t belong here?? When will I have time to eat and sleep and be a human being???? Realizing you can’t save every life. 

-Accomplishments: Getting hugged by a client. Being told “you’re going to make a great vet.” Performing surgery. Being able to eat lunch. Somehow surviving every rotation even though you know zero things. Saving a life or two. Getting a day off and enjoying life. Getting a question right. Passing the national board exam (NAVLE). Becoming a doctor of veterinary medicine! 

Roosevelt's January 11, 1944 message to the US Congress on the State of the Union

It is our duty now to begin to lay the plans and determine the strategy for the winning of a lasting peace and the establishment of an American standard of living higher than ever before known. We cannot be content, no matter how high that general standard of living may be, if some fraction of our people—whether it be one-third or one-fifth or one-tenth—is ill-fed, ill-clothed, ill-housed, and insecure.

This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength, under the protection of certain inalienable political rights—among them the right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. They were our rights to life and liberty.

As our nation has grown in size and stature, however—as our industrial economy expanded—these political rights proved inadequate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness.

We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. “Necessitous men are not free men.” People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.

In our day these economic truths have become accepted as self-evident. We have accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all—regardless of station, race, or creed.

Among these are:

The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the nation;
The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;
The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living;
The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at home or abroad;
The right of every family to a decent home;
The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health;
The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment;
The right to a good education.
All of these rights spell security. And after this war is won we must be prepared to move forward, in the implementation of these rights, to new goals of human happiness and well-being.

America’s own rightful place in the world depends in large part upon how fully these and similar rights have been carried into practice for all our citizens. For unless there is security here at home there cannot be lasting peace in the world.