InSight Mission to Mars

Our InSight mission will place a fixed science outpost on Mars to study its deep interior. Findings and research from this project will address one of the most fundamental questions we have about planetary and solar system science – How in the world did these rocky planets form?

By investigating the interior structure and processes of Mars, the InSight mission will gain a better understanding of the evolutionary formation of planets, including Earth.

InSight will record Mars’ vital signs to learn more about the planet, including:

Seismic Activity:

A seismometer will be used to record the seismic activity on Mars. This will give us information on the crust, mantel and core; and the relationship between them.

Temperature:

A heat flow probe will be used to take Mars’ temperature and determine the change over the course of a full Martian year.

Reflexes:

By looking at how the rotation of Mars wobbles, we will better understand what the core size may be and its composition.

Launch for the InSight mission is scheduled for March 2016, and even though you can’t physically travel with the lander, you can send your name to the Red Planet onboard. Make sure to submit your name before Sept. 8!

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    The NF-15B ACTIVE is the most maneuverable of any F-15 variant, but she didn’t start out that way. This airframe, originally designated the TF-15B (USAF serial number 71-0290), looked much like a typical F-15. She took her first flight on July 7, 1973, as the first two-seat F-15 in history and the sixth F-15 to roll off the assembly line.

    On September 7, 1988, she would have her “second first flight” following major modifications as the STOL/MTD (Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator). Modified F-18 stabilators were put in place forward of the wing as canards. Thrust vectoring in the pitch axis was also implemented, allowing takeoff rotation at only 39 knots and drastically shorter landing distances.

    In 1991, the STOL/MTD test program ended, and the USAF loaned the airframe to NASA, who modified it into the NF-15B ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles). The pitch thrust vectoring was traded for nozzles that could be vectored in pitch and yaw. This allowed for incredible maneuverability. The bird could perform yawing maneuvers while flying at 30 degrees angle of attack.

    Although never implemented, there were plans to further modify this airframe by removing the vertical tail planes, allowing thrust vectoring to be wholly responsible for yawing maneuvers. This would have been called the F-15 MANX, named after the naturally tailless cat.

    After decades of serving NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (now NASA Armstrong) as a successful experimental testbed for many different test programs, the NF-15 ACTIVE took its final flight in January 2009. On this last flight, she was the oldest still flying F-15. In July of 2015, she was put on static display at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, California.

I love space so much. I want to be thrown into a black hole so that my entire body can be torn apart and broken down into molecules that are torn apart into atoms that are torn apart I just want to be a bunch of stuff floating in space. nasa who do I call?