narrative time

anonymous asked:

there is a kernel of truth to dan's article - not his nasty spin or the fabricated quotes - but the fact that harry was the one to suggest a break. That has been consistent from all 4 boys, including H. it's interesting that most larries sort of ignore it. it's a little tricky, considering the others have said they didn't want the hiatus at first. I wish there was more open discussion about it that didn't include either completely villainizing harry, or completely glossing over the facts.

That’s certainly become sort of the official narrative, as Harry’s team included it in his own promo’s big articles, too (was it RS?). Whatever the reason they all agreed on it may be, I personally doubt that’s what really happened and I’m quite confident they all had plans to give a try to their solo careers by the time they announced the hiatus. I don’t buy the harry suggested it and the others were shocked and initially tried to resist little picture. I tend to believe they knew that was the right choice in that precise moment - something probably connected to their contracts, too- and went on with it.

When You

That time when you finally figure out what really matters, only to find out that none of it inherently matters.

Social splatter, some societies and their often brooding, competition-based, bloodlust which some apply liberally as a salve.

Automotive, assembly, lines, generational striving then computers; jobs gone. Never. Quite. The. Right. Amount. Of. Harbingers. To. Adequately. Taste. The. Future.

Guess there can only be one outcome, and that is for the Sun to rise; even though, it is very real though, that in 4.5 billion years it shall collapse and become, someday long after its whit dwarfness- a cluster burst of human star eyes reflections.

Remains, remain where they were slaughtered in the year of our Lord 16 and 93.

War, the administrator of tears, to bring the ultimate suffering, death, upon another has to be, on some level, a Cosmic Divine Comedy.

That time when you finally figure out what really matters, only to suss out that none of it inherently matters.

For those who don’t know what Samurai Jack is and why we should be stoked that it’s coming back:

There’s a loner with a man-bun

Originally posted by metalphantomon

Who was pulled out of his timeline

Originally posted by peteneems

And sees modern things through the lens of 17th century Japanese prince.

Originally posted by microphoned-in

There are awesome fight scenes

Originally posted by toonami

Originally posted by dontdrinkthemexicanwater

Originally posted by zoo-monkey

And dramatic narrative moments

Originally posted by tenkaichibudokai

Originally posted by long-ago-in-a-distant-land

Originally posted by ashiros

And best of all, the show fluctuates between being awesome and freaking ridiculous at the drop of a hat, often in the same narrative breath.

Originally posted by zoo-monkey

Originally posted by m4dtown

Originally posted by toonami

Originally posted by kainade

Originally posted by toonami

Originally posted by toonami

It’s a really good show to watch if you want to learn about the use of color and shapes in storytelling, as well as exaggerated perspective, use of negative space, timing, and narrative arcs. I recommend it to all comic artists, storyboarders, illustrators, cinematographers, writers… heck, ANYONE. GET HYPE.

Originally posted by heckboy

I don’t believe in narrative anymore. I don’t believe that’s what life is actually like, that there’s a pleasing resolve and everything to life. Today, I feel like creating a fractured narrative, a thing where time is compressed, events stuck on top of other events, and there’s no particular logic to it, or a distressing kind of logic. That’s much more real and true to the way I feel about things.
—  Nick Cave, One More Time With Feeling
3

DeJuan Guillory was shot in the back while lying on the ground with his hands behind his back.

Paul Holden LaFleur shot and killed DeJuan Guillory.

After Paul shot Dejuan, Dequincy Brown jumped on the officer’s back and bit him on the neck.  She is being charged with Attempted First Degree Murder.

After being bitten, the cop fired 3 more rounds, dropped his radio, then went sit in his car.  

Dequincy Brown called for help on the radio.

Two ambulances arrived 10 minutes later.  One ambulance left with the officer, the other left empty.  No one attempted CPR on DeJuanHe was left to die on the gravel road. 

DeJuan was begging for his life when he was shot.

The cop told Dequincy “shut the fuck up or i’ll shoot you” before he shot DeJuan.

The media cover story is Paul was responding to an attempted burglary.  We’ve seen this narrative play out enough times to know that this is, in fact, a media cover story.  

Please spread this.


waroncops.tumblr.com

docs.google.com
A note from the Indivisible Team
A note for all of us who feel defeated after Sessions from the Indivisible Team: This is the long game.

A note for all of us who feel defeated after Sessions from the Indivisible Team: This is the long game. We are going to lose a lot. We are going to get good at losing. We are going to lose cabinet votes for terrible nominees. We are going to lose bills that are offensive and appalling. But while we are losing, something else is going to happen. We are going to keep raising our voices and slowly our representatives are going to start listening to us. We’ve seen it happen. 


It won’t happen because of next week’s call to action. It’ll happen over months, where you keep showing up, regularly. Then, we are going to start winning. It’ll sneak up on us. We won’t understand why we are winning. But it starts with losing in a particular way- where we raise our voices and call it out when we aren’t listened to, where we get close but not quite there.

The first 100 days of a President’s term are the honeymoon period, the moment when he’s most likely to get his agenda enacted. Trump is spending his first 100 days mired in controversy, scandal, and backbiting - and that’s because you haven’t for a moment let anyone in Washington forget just how unpopular he is.

Every time we change the narrative, every time we delay, every time there’s a newspaper story about a member of Congress avoiding his or her constituents, that’s a win. And it matters.

You have already made history. You’ve delayed the confirmation of Trump’s cabinet picks longer than any time in recent history. You stopped the gutting on the congressional ethics office. You’ve made Republicans so nervous about the repeal of the Affordable Care Act that it’s been pushed further and further down the road. You caused an uproar of historic proportions over Trump’s Muslim ban and saved lives and reunited families in the process. You’ve inspired people who have never before taken action to make their voices heard and learn how to do things like check how their members of Congress voted and call them out for it.

We’ll never even know about some of the victories - because those will be the fights that this Administration considered starting and then realized it couldn’t win.

We’re in this together. Every visit. Every call. Every loss. Every win. That’s just what friends do. #StandIndivisible

In solidarity,

The Indivisible Team

10

8x12 “As Time Goes By” // 10x03 “Soul Survivor”
Two Knights on the Hunt

Posted as part of the Series “Of Blood, Bone and Darkness”:
A Carver Era Rewatch Hiatus Meta-Series

Eliot Spencer: White Male Punchline

ok so ANOTHER thing I love about Leverage is how seriously it DOESN’T take Eliot Spencer

because Eliot Spencer, taken at face value, is an absolutely generic white action movie/video game hero, right? has a Troubled Past, beats up armies of goons, cracks wise, hits on ladies, etc.

except that this show’s narrative turns every aspect of that character type into a punchline! not necessarily at his expense - but it goes out of its way to avoid the kind of reverence most testosterone-charged action media give White Male Badasses by sidelining him, refusing to let him play the hero, and making him comic relief most of the time, even when he’s being a Badass

in fact the only times the narrative does treat him with any sort of reverence?

is when he’s being kind. (which he does on a far more regular basis than most other characters of his type)

and that? actually makes him an interesting character

I never understood the “Don’t judge a book by its cover” sentiment.  As a kid, I remember thinking to myself, I thought that’s what book covers were for? They’re the first thing potential readers see when they’re browsing and they’re the subject of many an *intellectual* Instagram shot. But most importantly, artists work hard to make sure book covers reflect  what’s inside of them.

As the NPR Books intern, my hands end up on a lot of brand new titles, which also have brand new covers. So this summer, I’m going to be tumbling about book cover art and artists in a series I’m calling #bookcovercrush.

First up: Luiza Sauma’s Flesh and Bone and Water, which was designed by cover artist Lauren Peters-Collaer. The novel follows a wealthy Brazilian teenager who finds himself drawn to the family maid’s beautiful daughter after travelling to the mouth of the Amazon.

Peters-Collaer says, “First, I explored mixing painted patterns with natural elements of the Brazilian landscape to convey the tropical setting and lush, layered feeling of the narrative.”

“At the same time, I was interested in incorporating an obscured female visual to reference the woman who is a catalyst for the story, and who is increasingly illuminated throughout the course of the text.”

“These two ideas came together in the final cover”:

Be sure to watch out for next installment of #bookcovercrush!

-Intern Sydnee

Images courtesy of  Lauren Peters-Collaer and Scribner

Time and POV in Stuck in the Middle With You 12x12...

“So… tell me a story…” says Mr. Ketch, sitting across from Mary, just after the burning MOL symbol of the season announces…

The narrative is thus framed as told in flashback by Mary to Mr. Ketch.

The first POV we get is therefore Mary’s…

Time card… accompanied by the ticking of a stop watch (which we hear at intervals throughout the episode).

Mary witnesses Dean performing “super-hetero Dean” for Wally, or attempting to, in a diner - doesn’t go so well, with the, “My shy but devastatingly handsome friend,” huh Dean? Although, of course we can all agree Cas IS devastatingly handsome…

Mary is not impressed… (not with her sons bickering either - oh Mary - you ain’t seen nothing yet…)

under the cut as this got super long…


Keep reading

Tell me again it’s not canon.

It’s in the music.

True Love, Tallahassee, Regina’s Price. Cues and keys and crescendos, intertwined, layered again and again, pinned to scenes with the creator’s approval. Operation Mongoose? A TL motif. Going Home? A TL motif. Sacrifices, magic, teamwork? A TL motif.

It’s in the wardrobe.

Red and grey and black and back again. Plaid–confusion, discontent. Deep blue–loneliness, searching for family. Shared clothing, further intertwined. Parallels and callbacks to past couples, inciting conscious and subconscious connections. Why do they share this look instead of them or them?

It’s in the scenery.

Gallant knights with golden hair all in white abreast upright steeds. Splashes of color reflecting mood. Mirrors reflecting each other. Seals and symbols–the Tallahassee and Storybrooke, the dreamcatchers™, mirrors. All mirrors. Unicorn mobiles linked to unicorn hearts. A black unicorn, an unused mobile–innocence lost, never gained? White horses, black swans.

It’s in the camera direction. It’s in the editing.

Iconic shots, tricky angles, cued reactions–focus on her, not on him–which mean something. Rom-com zooms, reflections capturing both, pans guiding our attention to the thoughts behind the dialogue. Everything means something.

And the text. Hell yes, it’s in the text.

The magic to transcend realms. Unstoppable. Unbeatable. Wholehearted understanding, from one to the other. Mirrored storylines and struggles. Intertwined fates–both share a True Love already, after all. Longing glances, jealous quips, situations that require the one to save the other, then the other to save the one. Ultimate sacrifice. All canon. “I saved you, now save me.” “With you, I always know.” “I know you.” They’re stronger together than apart, time and time again.

Yes, it’s in subtext. It’s in innuendo and acting choices, it’s in interpretation and suggestion.

But when it’s built into the very foundation of the show–the Savior meets the Evil Queen–it’s not delusional. It’s not unintentional.

Either the wardrobe department, the music department, the prop department, the actors, and the editors are all going rogue…or someone told them to put it in the music, the wardrobe, the scenery, the camera direction, the subtext, and the text.

Tell me again Swan Queen isn’t canon.

#Melanin #WarOnMelanin 

The Aeta (Ayta, pronounced eye-tə), or Agta, are an indigenous people who live in scattered, isolated mountainous parts of the island of Luzon, the Philippines.

These peoples are considered to be Negritos, whose skin ranges from dark to very dark brown, and possessing features such as a small stature and frame; hair of a curly to kinky texture and a higher frequency of naturally lighter colour (blondism) relative to the general population; small nose; and dark brown eyes. They are thought to be among the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines, preceding the Austronesian migrations. The earliest inhabitants of the Philippines lived some 40,000 years ago.

The Aeta were included in the group of people termed “Negrito” during Spanish Era. Various Aeta groups in northern Luzon are known as Pugut or Pugot, an Ilocano term that also means “goblin” or “forest spirit”, and is the colloquial term for people with darker complexions. These names are mostly considered inappropriate or derogatory by fellow Negritos of northern Luzon.

… 

The Aeta are the indigenous people of the Philippines. The pale skin Eurasians you see there today are Mongoloid – not Negrito. The Mongoloids are invaders to the islands. Those they could not kill they have tried to breed out. The Aeta have been dealing with genocide longer than the Australian aborigine, and long before any Europeans set foot on the island. Most people suffer some sort of cognitive dissonance around this issue. It is inconceivable that Asians are killing black people and Asians have been killing black people and stealing their land for ‘thousands’ of years. There is no stigma like that of the European slave trade. The Arabs and the Mongols have essentially gotten away with the mass murder of hundreds of millions of black lives. Most see the people of India as a race and not genocide. To be clear – Indian is a nationality not a race. People are not aware of truly how much suffering black people on this earth have had to endure. 800 years before the transatlantic slave trade there was the Arab slave trade. The Arab slave trade was still going on when the European slave trade began and has never quite ended. It is said that the Arab slave trade was equal to the European slave trade if not worse. Before the Arab slave trade the Mongols killed upwards of 40 million people (some estimates are as high as 80 million). At this early time in human history that is almost half of what would have been the worlds known population. The Mongol Empire eventually stretched from Central Europe to the Sea of Japan. The black people in China and Japan were genocided out of history (some say they still remain in pockets). The black people of Thailand(the Mani), Cambodia (the Khmer) and Vietnam (the Champa) are all still there despite the genocide. In India the black people there have been under attack for 3500 years. Today black people in India are extremely confused about their identity. Most people alive today still dont know how it is that black people came to have straight hair even though the science is there. This may come as a surprise but black people were even the first Hawaiians and Hebrews. Racism did not start in Europe. Racism started in the East and spread towards Europe, which explains why they were the last ones to take part in the enslavement of indigenous black people. What the Mongols couldn’t finish the Arabs took up and what the Arabs couldn’t finish the Europeans took up. WE HAVE HAD NO FRIENDS YET NO RACE COULD HAVE ENDURED WHAT THE BLACK RACE HAS ENDURED AND STILL BE ALIVE TO TELL ABOUT IT. WE ARE THE TRUE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF ALL TROPICAL LAND ON THIS EARTH AND WE ARE STILL HERE…

[Message for the racists that commented on this post]

I know exactly what I’m talking about.

#BlackLivesMatter
#StopBlackGenocide  



None of our scholars used the word “colorism” because none of them saw the need to. It has only been popular for a couple years now and already I have seen this word used to cover up anti-black racism a thousand times over. Even when a situation is clearly anti-black racism rearing its ugly head people will say “colorism exists everywhere”… Even when all points are indicating that it’s black genocide and erasure, people are saying “colorism exists everywhere”…
All you hair revolutionaries and social services revolutionaries need to take a seat, and/or read a book.      



“Shadeism” was a popular term long before colorism, and still is. Do your research. Pigmentocracry is also another term you should all get familiar with.
Those terms do not apply to this image, and neither does colorism.



Just in case you missed it: Those terms do not apply to this image, and neither does colorism.    



It’s messed up that only one non-black person accurately saw this image for what it is. She wrote “98% sure that last girl is actually African and her white counterpart is….welll. not filipino”. The way the word colorism is being used is not serving our best interests. It should find its place among ethnic white people – where it belongs.

… 

Black people fought to no longer be called “coloured”. As soon as we rid ourselves of that term – here comes “colorism”… I found that very coincidental, and suspect.  



The word “colorism” may have some place (most likely among ethnic white groups) but as it stands it only serves to confuse the narrative. How many times did you hear Master Teacher MLK or Malcolm X use the word “colorism”? How many times did Master Teacher Dr. John Henrik Clarke or Dr. Yosef Ben-Jochannan use the word? Were you ever once confused by the words our black scholars used? What about the rest of our African historians? Did they too lack the intelligence? Do you think they lacked the proper vocabulary to express themselves? Could you dare think such a thing?

… 

The struggle for black people is real. The Black Holocaust is real. Black Genocide is real. Anti-Black Racism is real. Black Erasure is real. Fix your lips and call this what it is. “Colorism” is a nice soft word like “colonialism” that white people use to make themselves feel better about what is happening and what has happened. They are two very watered-down definitions that mask the brutality and continual injustice and unjust circumstance black people are now dealing with.  

… 

Can white people say STOP BLACK GENOCIDE AND ERASURE?

Can white people say STOP STEALING BLACK PEOPLES RESOURCES AND LANDS?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE WORLDWIDE DESERVE REPARATIONS?

Can white people say BLACK LOVE MATTERS?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE DESERVE LAND IN AMERICA?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE DESERVE SAFE SPACES?

Can white people say WHITE PEOPLE ARE THE REASON HOLLYWOOD
AND BOLLYWOOD IS ANTI-BLACK RACIST?

Can white people say NON-BLACK PEOPLE OF COLOR ALSO PERPETUATE ANTI-BLACK RACISM AND BLACK GENOCIDE?

Can white people say FOR 3000 YEARS BLACK PEOPLE IN INDIA HAVE BEEN ENSLAVED BY ANTI-BLACK RACISM?

Can white people say CLEARLY THERE IS A GENOCIDE TAKING PLACE IN INDIA AND MELANESIA?

Can white people say WHY HAS EVERYONE ELSE GOTTEN REPARATIONS BUT BLACK PEOPLE?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE DESERVE BLACK SPACES?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE IN AFRICA, THE WEST, INDIA, THAILAND AND MELANESIA HAVE BEEN CUT OFF FROM ONE ANOTHER BY EURASIANS?

Can white people say EVERY TIME THEY TURN ON THE TV THEY SEE THE ANTI-BLACK RACISM TOO?

Can white people say WHITE PEOPLE ARE CAUSING AND HAVE CAUSED BLACK CHILDREN TO SUFFER FROM SELF-HATE? 

Tips For Writing Time Travel:  An Illustrated Guide.

@jjpivotz asked:

“What is a good way that I could write time travelling without it being cliche?”

Ooh, I love questions like this!  They’re so much fun, and on a somewhat self-indulgent level, they really get me thinking on the tropes themselves.

So without further ado, here are my personal thoughts on writing about time travel:

1.  Embrace the fact that it’s not gonna make total sense.

This goes for a lot of creative fiction.  When I was writing my urban fantasy novel, for example, I used a lot of traditional mythological figures whose duties and depictions (i.e. one humanoid being reaping the dead despite the fact that over a hundred thousand people die a day, billion-year-old entities who still look and behave like teenagers, figures from religions whose world views wildly conflict interacting with each other, etc.) weren’t compatible with what we currently know about the laws of physics.  

And the sooner I resolved not to even attempt to explain it, the sooner my novel improved.  

The wonderful thing about fiction is that it doesn’t have to imitate reality as we know it;  the laws of the physical universe need not apply.  And as long as the characters in your universe accept that, so will the reader.  

I’ve had around twenty beta readers look at my book, and not one of them has poked holes in my casual disregard for the conventionally accepted rules of physical reality.  The suspension of disbelief is an amazing thing.

As for how to best apply this to time travel, take Back to the Future, for example. This is one of the best time travel series ever made, but if you really look at what’s going on, you’ll come to find that none of it really makes any sense at all.

First of all, Marty McFly is a popular high school student whose best friend is an eccentric nuclear physicist.  Conventional wisdom (and just about every fiction writing book or advice blog I’ve ever read) would dictate that this is a pretty heavy plot-point and warrants some explanation.  But the narrative never questions it, and as such neither does the vast majority of its audience.  

It is in this exact manner that Back to the Future handles its heaviest of all plotpoints, the act of time travel, which is the main driving force behind its entire plot.  

How does it explain Doc Brown’s ability to time travel?  Well, he invented the Flux Capacitor, of course.  What is a Flux Capacitor, you ask?  How does it work, exactly?  Well, fucked if I know.  All I know is that the narrative treats it like it’s a real thing, and by default, so do I.    

The same could be said for the magically changing family portrait, the fact that the characters can’t interact with their past or future selves without universal destruction, flying cars, and the fact that the McFlys’ future children inexplicably look exactly like them.  None of it makes any sense.  And it’s fucking magical.

Another of my favorite examples of this is pre-Moffat Doctor Who.  The science is campy, occasionally straight-up ridiculous, and unabashedly nonsensical, yet paves the way for some truly great and thought provoking storylines and commentary.  

Bottom line is, I don’t know how to time travel.  I’m guessing you don’t either, otherwise you probably wouldn’t be asking me for advice on how to write it.  Accept it.  Embrace it.  Don’t be bashful about it – trust me, time travelers are probably a minority in your readership, so they won’t judge you.

So as to what would be a good means of writing time travel, the short answer is:  any way you want.  For obvious reasons, I’d stay away from old cars, police boxes, and phone booths, but with the power of the suspension of disbelief, virtually nothing is off the table:  a pair of magic sneakers, a refrigerator, a closet, a treehouse -oh, crap, that one’s been done before.  But you get the picture.  You can be as creative as you want to be about it.  Don’t be afraid to step outside the police box, so to speak.  

Trust in the magic of the suspension of disbelief, and don’t overthink things.  Your story and readers will thank you.

As for how to avoid other cliches, that brings me to my next point: 

2.  Look at the tried and true tropes of time traveling.  Now subvert them.

This might just be me and my adoration of irony talking, but since you specifically asked how to avoid cliche I’m going to indulge myself here.

Do the exact opposite of what people expect from narratives about time travel.  You know the old trope:  the protagonist steps on a bug, and comes back to the present to find the world being ruled by gorillas.  

I’m not telling you not to include drastic consequences for time travel, because there would probably be quite a few (at least if you believe in the chaos theory, which states every action has a universal reaction.)  

But you could toy around with the idea that fate isn’t something that can ultimately be altered at all, and that all the protagonist accomplishes is solidifying (or even triggering) a pre-existing outcome.   

My knee-jerk suggestion, as someone who takes fiendish glee in incorporating humor into my writing, would be to make the protagonist have some Forrest Gump-type encounters that unwittingly trigger huge, history-defining event, but it can also be significantly more tragic than that:  maybe the protagonist goes back in time to save his father from a hit-and-run car accident, for example, and then accidentally kills him.  Or perhaps he realizes that his father was a bad man (beat his mother, planned on killing someone, etc.) and makes a moral decision to kill him (which is also a great way to ask philosophical questions.  More on that later.)  

I don’t know what kind of time travel your writing or what your style of writing is, but these are things I’d personally just love to play around with.    

Or maybe time travel does change things, but it’s not even close to what the protagonist expected:  maybe his words of wisdom to his newly married mother about true love and the meaning of life and whatnot unexpectedly lead her to realize that she’s deeply unhappy in her current marriage, and he returns to the present to find her divorced (lesbian stepmom optional.)  

Maybe absolutely nothing at all changes, but he realizes that he’s responsible for some famous Mandela Effect, like the Bearenstein/Bearenstain discrepancy.  

Bottom line is, don’t be afraid to do the unexpected.  But conversely, don’t be afraid to use tried and true tropes, either:  regardless of how overdone they may seem to be, they can almost always be rejuvenated when interjected with a thought-provoking plot.

Which brings me to my final point:

3.  Make sure it has something to say.

Science fiction, especially the speculative variety, tends to be best when it begins by asking a question, for which it will later provide an answer.  Take, for example, Planet of the Apes.  The pervasive question of the movie is whether or not humanity is inherently self-destructive, which it ultimately answers with its famed final plot twist that humanity has long since destroyed itself.  

Rod Serling (who was incidentally responsible for the original Planet of the Apes, by the way) did this remarkably well:  almost every episode of the Twilight Zone packed a massive philosophical punch due to the fact that they followed this simplistic formula.  The episode would begin with the presentation of a question, big or small (frequently by the charismatic Serling himself) and by the end of the episode, that question would be answered. 

I’m not going to go in to detail here, as it would spoil the magic of uncovering the plot twists for the first time, but Serling used his speculation to tackle the narrow-mindedness of beauty standards in Eye of the Beholder, the dangers of fascism in Obsolete Man, the communist paranoia of the time period with the Monsters are Due on Maple Street, and countless more.  

I would recommend watching the original Twilight Zone for almost anyone looking to write speculative fiction such as time travel. 

Even if your work isn’t compatible with this specific formula of Question => Debate => Answer (which some work isn’t) it will still need to have some kind of underlying statement to it, or no matter how clever the science fiction is or how original the time travel is, it will fall flat.  

This is why Twilight Zone, Planet of the Apes, Back to the Future, and (pre-Moffat, as I always feel inclined to stress – he does literally the opposite of almost everything I recommend here) Doctor Who still remain widely enjoyed today, despite the fact that many of their tropes have been used many, many times since they original aired.

So for time travel, remember that it is a means, not an end.  You could write the most cliched type of time travel story imaginable, and your audience will still feel fulfilled by it if your message is heartfelt, thought-provoking, and/or poignant.

Maybe you want to use time travel to make a statement about your belief in the existence of fate, or lack thereof.  In this case, using the Sterling Approach, you would have your story begin with the question of whether or not humans can alter or change destiny, allow the narrative/characters to argue the question back and forth for a while, and then ultimately disclose what you believe the answer to be.

Or maybe you want to use time travel to explore or subvert the treachery of history and how it is taught, and show how the true narrative can be explored, purposefully or otherwise, by the victors.  

Maybe you want to show that there’s no clear answer, or maybe no answer at all, a la the cheerful nihilism of Douglas Adams novels.

Either way, figure out what you want your message to be long before you put pen to paper, and then use time travel, like any other creative trope, as a means to an end to answer it.  Your story will thank you for it.

(I hope this helps!)

shesaysdisco  asked:

For my medieval literature class this semester we read a version of "Pangur Bán" and now I'm writing my final paper about how differences in translation affect the narrative -- every time I read one of the versions or type the cat's name, I think of your weasel queen! Imagining her screaming at the monk while he's trying to do his important intellectual work is a very amusing image (he would probably be much more annoyed if that were the case).

So in peace our task we ply, 
Pangur Ban, my cat, and I; 
In our arts we find our bliss, 
I have mine and -
mrrraaaaa
and she has -
MRAAARRRRR MWRRAAAAWWWW 
oh for fuck’s sake Pangur Ban

youtube

Character Design is an important part of any movie, but few use it to map out character design as well as Howl’s Moving Castle

Closed Captions available.

Full Transcript below

Keep reading

Tonight, the Hulu streaming service premieres a new adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale, the 1986 novel by Margaret Atwood. Her futuristic story, in which women are denied rights and freedoms and the most fertile of them treated as breeding stock, is now a ten-part miniseries, starring Elisabeth Moss, who played Peggy Olson on Mad Men. Our TV critic, David Bianculli, says:

The Handmaid’s Tale arrives on Hulu already riding a wave of controversy, with several people involved in the production – some producers, and even some stars – denying that this new miniseries adaptation is either a frightening feminist narrative or a timely political commentary. Of course it is. And those aspects, especially the swift and aggressively hostile erosion of women’s rights and status, are what make The Handmaid’s Tale so haunting.”

I saw a great post the other day about how frustrating it is that so much media very narrowly defines self-sacrifice as one character dying for another, and it reminded me of how much I adore Critical Role for cheerfully subverting that idea again and again and again. Don’t get me wrong, character death is certainly possible with a bad dice roll, but whenever things are controlled by some form of narrative, there’s a clear appreciation for scenarios that don’t involve killing off characters for angst or drama.

I mean, the obvious example is the perfect setup for a tragiheroic character death: Vex gets caught in the detonation of a trap in the tomb of the Raven Queen’s champion and is killed instantly, and her brother, distraught, demands that the Raven Queen take his life in exchange for hers. Raven Queen agrees, Vex starts breathing again… but Vax is still alive. The DM getting creative with what it means for someone to sacrifice their life (surprise! you’re the new champion of the Raven Queen and she’s got a series of creepy and ominously ill-defined jobs for you!) meant that we got a series of fascinating character arcs unspooling all at once.

Keeping away from the self-sacrifice = character-death idea also helps you avoid fridging characters. Percy’s backstory features his sister Cassandra helping him escape the Briarwoods… and getting shot down in the process. But when the party returns to Whitestone, they discover that Cassandra is not only still alive, she’s been working with the Briarwoods to dismantle the townspeople’s attempts to revolt out of a complicated combination of supernatural persuasion and her lingering guilt and rage over Percy having left her to die. The result—Cassandra’s sacrifice taking a very, very different form than the “died to save her brother” narrative—is a million times more interesting than yet another angsty backstory death.

You can apply this stuff to make villains more memorable, too. Delilah wanted Sylas back, so she raised him as a vampire in exchange for a different form of self-sacrifice: the work they’d do together in order to bring Vecna back into the world. The sacrifice can go way, way, way beyond the personal, to the point where there are bodies literally covering the walls.

Or you can have a heroic character refuse an act of self-sacrifice. Vex refused Sondur’s offer to make her into something stronger in order to protect her friends because she wasn’t willing to give up what he requested in return. She knows it was the right thing to do, but the guilt of that decision lingers and has done a lot to shape her character.

You can have a self-sacrifice scenario where the person in question knows that there’s no positive result but is willing to do anything to avoid the negative. When Allura’s teleportation circle malfunctioned, Kima knew that following her was probably not going to bring Allura back and could’ve resulted in both of their deaths, but she wasn’t going to leave her. And again, that act of heroic death was averted when Keyleth and Vex managed to rescue them from the ocean.

There are so many vastly more interesting ways to approach the narrative notion of self-sacrifice that go way, way beyond “so the character dies and everyone else is sad about it, the end”. The challenge that goes into approaching self-sacrifice in a creative way really pays off, and the kicker is that you can explore loss and fear and devastation without losing that underlying beacon of hope. That’s pretty cool.