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A little chart showing all the parts of the Old Home and New Home that have narration that changes depending on who is currently in control. first column is neutral, second is post pacifist (aka, true Frisk) and third is Chara. In spots that are blank, the narration is the same as it is in neutral. for the bed in Old Home the memories from Chara occur in both neutral and genocide routes, but I put it on the Chara side as it is their memories being shared, not just normal neutral narration.

*Now fixed for easy viewing and fixed an error.

Friendly reminder that Harry Potter is not an unreliable narrator. He’s a limited narrator. Unreliable narration is a specific narrative technique and it’s not used much in HP. On the whole, Harry’s a pretty trustworthy narrator. He does make assumptions that prove to be incorrect now and then but on the whole his perception is generally accurate.

Harry is, however, shown to be sometimes unobservant and that’s really where fandom has wiggle room with headcanons. There’s plenty of room to say “well, harry just didn’t notice this.” But that’s not because he’s an unreliable narrator. We have no reason not to assume his general perception of events and how people are is wrong.

nownovel.com
Who is the unreliable narrator?

The character who is an unreliable narrator can be one of the most powerful tools available to a writer. The unreliability may be obvious to the reader throughout the novel, may be revealed gradually or may come as a single revelation that results in a major plot twist.

An unreliable narrator is a character who tells the readers a story that the reader cannot take at face value. This may be because the point of view character is insane, lying, deluded or for any number of other reasons.

Read More →

A little chart showing all the parts of the Old Home and New Home that have narration that changes depending on who is currently in control. first column is neutral, second is post pacifist (aka, true Frisk) and third is Chara. In spots that are blank, the narration is the same as it is in neutral. for the bed in Old Home the memories from Chara occur in both neutral and genocide routes, but I put it on the Chara side as it is their memories being shared, not just normal neutral narration.  you will have to click on it to read the text properly, sorry, just how Tumblr treats large images. 

and yes, Toby took the time and remember to go and make it so the ink in Asgore’s journal that was still almost wet was dry when you visited it post pacifist. Toriel’s sock drawer also has the following text for post pacifist that I can’t seem to get to trigger post pacifist. 
“15727: * It’s TORIEL’s sock  collection.
15728: * (You came all the way back here to look at  Toriel’s socks.)/
15729: * (You have great priorities in life.)”
and the tree has 
“11458: * Every time this old tree grows any leaves, they fall  right off.
11459: * It’s a neat-looking tree.
11460: *It’s natural for a tree to  lose its leaves.”
There a few changes in Old Home when you kill Toriel, but I’ll make a seperate post for that.

Edit: DOH! The red text for the opening of the chain should be under Chara, not Frisk.
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I remember that place. It was supposed to be a fun, safe place for children.

comealongpixie  asked:

Hi! Do you have any advice for trying to write two stories at once, past and present? Not like flashbacks, but you sort of start at one point and then throughout the story you reveal what has happened up to that point as well as what happens next. I've done a lot of searching but all that comes up is advice on past vs. present tense, which is not what I'm looking for.

I’m doing the exact same thing for my July NaNoWriMo project (because I can’t do anything easy, ever), and I’ve been hammering away at how to do this for a few weeks. That doesn’t make me an expert, but here’s my advice.

  • Timeline EVERYTHING. You’re going to need timelines galore, more than one, so that you can compare past and present to each other. Make at least one total time, split your two stories into separate timelines, and finally it might be a good idea to create a timeline where you mix the events together in how you want to write them (post-it notes might be best for this, you’re going to be moving things around a lot).
  • Look for matching highs and lows. I am definitely going to do more work on this, but you need to make sure your cuts back and forth in time match up in terms of tone, intent, and events. You don’t want to cut off a cliffhanger and spend the next fifty pages relating a rather calm hang-out with friends. Matching the events together keeps the action flowing.
  • Colored pens are your friend. Keep track of events, characters, past and present action by using designated colors. Be consistent, or you’ll confuse yourself!
  • Consider limiting your viewpoints. Multiple points of view combined with going back and forth in time is going to be confusing for you; your readers will have even more of a tough time with it. Consider choosing a few narrators (I have two main ones, two minor ones). They’ll be an anchor for your readers to easily understand who is conveying what and when.
  • Break it down to scenes, not chapters. I guarantee you’ll have to shift about how the story is told in your later drafts. Split things up by scenes to easily shift them around. You’ll thank yourself later.
  • Flashcards are also your friends. Shuffling scenes, characters, tone, and setting are super easy to do with flashcards. If you’re working with time, believe me, you will need them.

That’s the prep side of things. Now let’s consider the actual story side of things:

  • Figure out how the past and present connect. In my story, it revolves around the fate of one person who connects both narrations together. Tying these stories together ahead of time will help you figure out how to reveal that to the reader.
  • Your main character(s) are essential. This is true for any story, but if the reader is going to be time-jumping, they need reasons to care equally for both past and present stories. Your characters are the key to that. Time jumping is, on the surface, a gimmick; the story that goes with it will be the true seller.
  • Tell time via setting. How has the present changed from the past? What do the characters now have or don’t have that’s different? It’s amazing how things change in just ten years. Don’t neglect that part of the story!
  • Figure out why the story has to be told this way. I mentioned that time jumping is a gimmick, and that’s because it is. If there’s no reason the story has to be told this way, you risk irritating the reader with this trick rather than fascinating them. With my story, it’s essential to explaining a present problem that was created by the past, and to show how the connecting figure plays a part in both. There are numerous reasons why you’d use this to tell a story, but make sure it’s an important element of the story.

I love pointing out my character’s flaws in my narrative. If they’re doing something weird or make a face that isn’t attractive, I point it out because they have those flaws for a reason, canon or OC. I think it adds a bit of life to have my character to do normal things that might not be completely attractive or sexy, but just rather off putting or even ugly or mean.

Foreshadowing/Chara Narrating

There are parts of the text of the game that foreshadow events, and are things you couldn’t know on your first playthroughs, but you still get these foreshadowing bits anyway. 

Lets start off with the “dirty jokes” you can tell Woshua. 
 * You tell a joke about two kids who played in a muddy flower garden.
Asriel and Chara

 * You tell a joke about a kid who ate a pie with  their bare hands.
Frisk, Asriel, or Chara.

* You tell a joke about a kid  who slept in the soil.
Chara is the only buried human. sleeping in the soil means you are buried and dead.

*What a comfortable bed. * (If you laid down here,  you might not ever get up.)
This is what happens when you examine Chara’s bed, that they died in.

* (It’s an illustration of a strange creature…) 
* (There’s something very unsettling about this drawing.)
This is what you see when reading about what happens when a boss monster absorbs a human soul, the transformation that happens, thats what was created when Asriel absorbed Chara’s soul. thats why its unsettling.

* You hug the Lost Soul and  tell her that you’re going  to see her again.
* You tell the Lost Soul that  you have to go if you’re  going to free everyone.
* You tell the Lost Soul that  you’re going to save  everyone.
Another popular theory is that these lines talking to the lost souls of Asgore and Toriel are from memories of when Asriel or Chara told them this when they wanted to leave and take the human souls to free everyone,

STOP IT! Get away from me!  Do you hear me!? I’ll tear you apart!
Asriel screaming this out could be what he screamed at the villagers, or what Chara screamed. He yells this when you are saving him, but the warning to get away and threatening to tear Frisk apart doesn’t make sense when he attacks with energy and Frisk can’t move their body.

* Do not worry about  me.
* Someone has to take care of these flowers.
* Don’t worry about  me.
* Someone has to take care of these flowers.
Toriel, after you spare her, will go to the flowers you fell on, Chara’s grave, and tell you this. Asriel will be there and say the same thing but with a contraction in the post pacifist walk.

Toriel:
* Why not use your  imagination to  divert yourself?
* Pretend you are…
* A monarch!
* Rule over the leaf pile  with a fist of iron.
* Can you do that for me?

Flowey:
* Or will you give  up entirely on  this world…
… and let ME inherit  the power to control  it?
* I am the prince of  this world’s future.
 * Don’t worry, my little  monarch, my plan  isn’t regicide.

The irony of this is lost if you don’t know the neutral ending. Toriel was married to the monarch, and left him because of how he ruled so cruelly.  Flowey is Asriel, he was actually the prince of the underground’s future, and his plan is literally regicide, as he destroys Asgore’s soul and planned on you weakening Asgore for him.

Toriel discussing the first dummy:
* That… however, is  only a dummy.  It cannot harm you.
* It is made of cotton. It has no desire for revenge…
* You can say anything… The dummy will not be bothered.
As we learn from the Mad Dummy, this is actually false.


and of course, then there are all the scenarios when Chara narrates in the genocide run.