namibia. africa

Reserve in Namibia, Africa ©

I bet you didn’t know that the Giraffe as a species is in serious trouble since populations have plummeted by nearly 40% in the past two decades across Africa.

Why? Well, it’s mainly due to major habitat loss, habitat degradation, and population fragmentation, worsened by illegal hunting and human population expansion. At the end of 2016, the Giraffe was uplisted on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species from “least concern” to “vulnerable”. While other African animals such as the rhino and elephant are known to be threatened worldwide, the Giraffe has not gained much attention at all and is silently slipping towards extinction. What no one realizes is that there’s actually less Giraffe than there are elephants…
Rigorous conservation efforts will need to be undertaken in order to restore declining populations. Greater awareness of this issue is the first step.

With both her parents being nature photographers, Tippi Degre has had one amazing childhood. Before she was born, her French parents relocated to Namibia, Africa, where she grew up alongside wild animals such as zebras, elephants, cheetahs, and lions. During her stay in Namibia, she befriended a 28-year old elephant named Abu.

Namib Desert - Namibia

Covering 81,000 sq km, the Namib is a coastal desert in south west Africa, stretching between Angola, ,Namibia and South Africa. In the local Nama language, Namib means “open space”. The desert is almost totally barren, receiving less than 1cm of rain annually. Instead, Fogs that blow in from the ocean in the early morning are the main source of moisture for the local animals and plant species. 

In the southern parts of the desert, Sand dunes that range in colour from pink to orange can rise as high as 300m. The desert is a rich source of diamonds and salt. 

Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa
One of the driest regions on Earth, the Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa (23.0N, 15.0E) lies adjacent to the Atlantic coast but the upwelling oceanic water causes a very stable rainless atmosphere. The few local inland rivers do not reach the sea but instead, appear as long indentations where they penetrate the dune fields and end as small dry lakes. The vast dune fields are the result of sands deposited over millions of years by the stream flow.

(via NASA Image and Video Library)